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ember1205

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ember1205 last won the day on September 13 2015

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About ember1205

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    Team Tungsten

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  • Name
    Mark
  • Location
    CT
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    Male
  • Drives
    '15 Silverado Crew Cab 4x4

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  1. There won't be a "one size fits all" sort of answer here as different folks have different needs. I have been through a number of different attempts with a similar sort of need and have mostly given up on things I've tried. Ultimately, I settled on the iOttie as it works with both my iPhone 6S and my Pixel XL phones easily. It holds both phones sizes easily and securely. While it does allow some vibration, it's generally VERY still when the vehicle is in motion.
  2. Camper Length and Weight affect on towing...?

    A lighter trailer that has the same cross-section as your current one would actually be WORSE with regard to being pushed around by the wind. You'll need to take into consideration the cross-section AND the weight of the trailer to understand if impacts are going to be better or worse with regards to wind.
  3. That's EXACTLY why they do it. And it's also why they make the Colorado/Canyon. Their entire class of "pickup trucks" is covered by every single one they make. In order to achieve EPA standards, they have to achieve it based on the totality of the class. Since there are a LOT of people that do not tow with their trucks, the higher MPG vehicles are great for them and help GM raise the average of the entire class. Have you noticed that Ford no longer makes the Ranger? Ever stop to wonder why? Because they no longer need it to offset the MPG of the larger trucks.
  4. If your friend will actually let you take the trailer camping once or twice, that would be about the ideal situation, I would think - even if you have to "rent" the trailer from him when you do (small change compared to what it will "cost" you to buy the wrong trailer). If not, maybe there's a place where you actually COULD rent a TT once or twice - check with dealers to see if they'd offer it on a used trailer on their lot.
  5. You're not going to want to tow that trailer... 4x4 Double Cab with the 3.08 rear end is rated to tow 6200 lbs and has a cargo rating of 1800 lbs. By time you add in all of your "stuff" and the weight of the passengers in the vehicle, you're not going to be able to distribute things to get to where you need to be. Loaded properly, your trailer would literally max out 6200 lbs. And, with proper balance, you'd be looking at somewhere around 800 lbs or so of tongue weight. Two adults is about 350-400 pounds on average, leaving you with about 600 pounds of leeway for additional cargo in the bed (which would impact how much tongue weight you could carry without a weight distributing hitch) and passengers. You'd literally be right on the line. That truck is going to drag badly in hilly areas weighted down like that to the point where A) your MPG is going to be well into the single digits, B) you're going to tick off a LOT of people by climbing hills so slowly, and C) you're going to feel wiped out when you get where you're going. The longer the distance you drag that trailer to get where you're going (or home), the more that this is going to ring true.
  6. Is max trailer worth cost

    I couldn't agree more on the topic of being familiar and OVERLY cautious when towing, especially if you don't do it a lot. Leave a LOT of extra room, and a LOT of extra time to make the trip to wherever you're going. You're not going to be flying down the highway at 75 with three extra tons of weight behind you. At least not safely.
  7. Is max trailer worth cost

    4x4 CCSB w/ 6.2 -without- Max Trailer has a 9100 lb TOW capacity. It also has a cargo capacity of 1690 which needs to include you, passengers, anything in the bed -AND- the tongue weight from the trailer. A 9k trailer should be transferring somewhere around 1000-1200 lbs (give or take) to the truck. That leaves you with 490-690 to account for anything in the bed, the back seat, and passengers. If you add Max Trailer, you have a limit of gross weight for the trailer of 11,100 and cargo capacity of 2030. The trailer should be expected to transfer somewhere around 1200-1400 lbs to the truck, leaving you with between 630 and 830 for you, passengers, back seat and bed cargo. One thing to keep in mind is that you can often put ALL of your "stuff" inside the TT, adding to its total weight. That way, 1000lbs of cargo in the trailer only adds about 125 lbs to the truck (leaving you with more room to handle passenger weight. The only way you can really know for sure is to weigh everything. You should have access to the dry weight of the trailer. Add in EVERYTHING that you plan on carrying in/on the trailer. Propane tanks plus propane, water, clothes, etc. If you are not 100% sure of the weight of stuff you plan to take with you, pack it all into whatever vehicle you're currently driving and hit the scales. Then go back without all of that stuff and weigh again. The difference is the weight of the stuff you will be loading in the trailer. Weigh WITH everything first and without second. Do NOT fuel the vehicle up in between. This will give you just a little bit of grace weight because you will be weighing the second time without your cargo AND without a small amount of fuel in the vehicle.
  8. Is max trailer worth cost

    First, you need to determine if you NEED Max Trailering. Without it, the 4x4 6.2 CCSB has a max payload of 1690 and max towing of 9100. With it, there's a max payload of 2030 and max towing of 11,600. If you don't NEED it, you then need to decide if you WANT it. Max trailering is going make the truck ride a little stiffer without a trailer and get slightly worse fuel economy when not towing. Without Max Trailering, you'll get slightly better MPG when not towing, but your MPG will dive lower when you are towing and the truck will "feel" more weighed down. The first one is easy - do the math. If it becomes a matter of choice, you have to add in things like how many miles will you tow versus not? A high percentage of towing miles, or towing through hilly terrain (meaning anything not completely flat) is going to a bit more "frustrating" without the Max Trailering package. For me, I have the 3.42 rear end with the 5.3L motor. I have a 10k equipment trailer that I will drag behind me about 50 miles/year. Even when it's loaded and representing about 7500lbs of tow weight, I still can navigate my areas fairly easily. And, even though the MPG drops to single digits for those runs, I more than offset with the higher mileage for all of the rest of the driving I do (about 24k overall per year). I wouldn't opt for the Max Trailering because it doesn't represent a real benefit -FOR ME-.
  9. What version of iOS? I'm betting that GM isn't going to "support" the iPhone X until sometime in 2020 - supported phones are almost ALWAYS at least a full year old, and the X is "different enough" that they'll need time to test everything. I believe that I had read that iOS 11.2.1 had some issues with BT where the other party had difficulty hearing you and it was addressed in 11.2.5.
  10. I have not had that specific issue. Maybe check with the dealership to see if there are updates to the Bluetooth in the truck, although they will likely charge you for performing the work as your truck is likely out of warranty. You could also check to be certain that the iPhone is on the latest iOS (currently 11.2.5), and you could completely remove the connection on both sides and re-sync the phone to the truck.
  11. Having Tow/Haul mode and a factory hitch / wiring does NOT immediately mean that there will be an integrated brake controller. The button on the end of the gear shift is to put the ECM into a different program so that shift points are at higher RPM's and shifting is more "purposeful" to prevent hunting through gears when towing.
  12. Is the newer 5.3 enough engine

    I have an equipment trailer that I tow with mine... 5.3 / 3.42 crew cab just like you're looking at. It tows FINE. The motor may rev a bit more with the trailer (I typically haul 6500-7000 combined trailer and cargo), and the mileage will drop when you tow. But, in the end, the extra you spend in gas for the tow times is WAY LESS than the extra you'll spend for a 3/4 ton and the extra gas all the time. If you have a lot of "stuff" to take with you when you drag the camper, that's a different story - the 3/4 is going to be the better choice in that scenario.
  13. Oh! Of course! OF COURSE! How could I have been so wrong? If you're going to go around quoting two year old posts, you should cover the whole conversation - including the ones that actually SUPPORT what I was saying. It isn't "wrong", it's exactly right. In the case of a tune, however, it's very easy for GM to provide the necessary proof. A tune changes the way that many parts of the drivetrain operate. If one of the components has been altered in its operation by the tune, and fails prematurely, GM can deny coverage because they can claim that the tune made it operate in a manner that wasn't intended.
  14. Securing a flatscreen tv upright

    Wow... Glad having it cocked sideways like that didn't cause any damage from stress on the box from wind.
  15. Securing a flatscreen tv upright

    Given that you have a ways to travel with it, you're taking a smart approach by wanting to keep it in an upright position. Be careful with ratchet straps and don't overtighten them. Whether you go over the top or "around" the end at the tailgate, too much tension on the straps will result in excessive pressure being transferred to the TV inside the box. Using some pieces of wood between the straps and the box should help to distribute the tension a little better as would using two straps (1/3 of the way in from each end) instead of just one. A "U" shaped assembly of wood on each side in the floor of the bed will ensure that the TV won't kick from side to side and would also mean you wouldn't need to clamp as tightly over the top.
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