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grimmysnr

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grimmysnr last won the day on September 29 2012

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  1. There is a fuse in the passenger fuse box that has a blade tap for this exact thing. Look in the fuse box on the front passenger side and there will be one in there for standby power. It is open already, no need to splice or jam something in anywhere. Just put a blade on your blue remote wire and plug it in. Works fine with auto stop start and everything. This is where I am tapped in at.
  2. Yep! Those are the ones. I couldn't get the connector out without doing exactly what you seem to have done to your hands. So I gave up and left the connector installed and then tapped in place. Solid blue is positive and the Brown/Blue stripe is negative.
  3. Did you try a single resistor per tailiight or per bulb? I watched a video about swapping bulbs for a 2018 Silverado and they had to use two resistors per side. Basically one resistor per bulb. I believe the video was from Headlight Revolution where they said that since each tailight has two bulbs that a resistor was needed for each LED bulb making two per side.
  4. Hey folks, I see a lot of people have been able to successfully swap the front turn signals. I did the same thing to my truck. I have the incandescent rear bulbs and from what little research I have seen, swapping the rear with just bulbs still hyper flash unlike the fronts. This leads me to believe that the rear will need resistors. I read a few posts saying that even after resistors there is still hyperflashing. Has anybody had any luck with swapping out the rear bulbs?
  5. If you look at the picture above, the audio module is the better place to tap these wires.
  6. Sorry it took me a while to respond. I did not get notified. Unfortunately, I am unable to tell exactly which one, but the good news is that any set of wires that is twisted together is generally a speaker wire set. I cannot say which colors are which. There may be other wires that are spiral, but to be sure look at the wires coming off the audio module in the above picture. It is actually best that you tap from the front speakers because the overall volume level is much higher than the rear. I attempted to tap the rear speakers the same way you are looking to do and ended up going with the wires off the audio module. If you adjust your fade to the rear speakers and balance left or right I think you will be disappointed with their output at the same volume level set on on the radio. Once I get back to my truck I might be able to look under there and see if I can find out which wires are which. Either way, I recommend you tap off the front speakers. I will see what I can find later.
  7. I am attempting to isolate this noise coming from my 2015 Yukon XL with the 5.3L. I made a video of it and posted it on Youtube. Hopefully it will embed here. It seems to be coming from the right side of the motor and it occurs at idle, but more frequently between 1,500 and 2,000 RPM. I was going to call the dealer and make an appointment, but I was curious if any of you have heard this noise before. It is not the DI noise. If the video embeds, it sounds like a spark arcing and it start faint. If you listen closely, once you heard it you can't unhear it. It is intermittent and it seems to occur if I hold it in that RPM range, but if I vary the throttle, upon decel of the RPM is when it occurs most often.
  8. The difference is light intensity and lumen output. With more light comes more power and with more power there is more heat. Those 55w ballasts are known to melt plastic halogen housings and as a courtesy to other drivers 55w output is just a bit too much. Even 35w will eventually deteriorate the reflection immediately around the bulb. You should be fine for a while though. Just be courteous and make sure to aim your lights a little lower since you will be blinding everybody on the road. Also stay within 4300k to 5500k. Anything above 5000k starts getting into the blue light spectrum and then lumen output becomes regressive. The higher kelvin rating is actually a lower light output. Goodluck.
  9. The good news is that LED technology is getting pretty good these days. LED lumen output is getting close to 55w HID output and bulb design mimics the light dispersion in halogen reflector housings. In fact, LEDs is probably the recommended solution now for a plug and play into a halogen reflector. If you end up retrofitting projector housings, HIDs still reign supreme. With that being said, I have some experience trying to retrofit some HIDs into recent GM vehicles and one thing about GM stays true; they don't like to change what isn't broke. Their headlights, especially halogen headlights, use Pulse Width Modulation (PWM) that sends micropulses of voltage power to halogen headlamps to deter modification by users and to control the brighteness of halogen/LED Daytime Running Lights. Instead of a constant 12 power source, the vehicle modulated and pulses a 12v power source to save power, increase component longevity, and finite control. What does this mean for you? To retrofit HID or LED bulbs into stock GM reflector housings, you will likely need a relay harness with a capacitor wired in series with the harness to smooth out the pulses on the input side of the harness. Basically the vehicle plugs into the input side of the relay harness, but you have to wire a capacitor inbetween. If you don't the relay will cycle on and off at nearly 60-80 hertz which will practically destroy the internals of the relay. The capacitor will deliver a smooth and solid 12v signal to turn on the relay. The power side of the relay will wire to the battery and then two more sets of wires will go out to the lights. This is kind of like an "anti-flicker" module but just one step further. Anti-flicker wont be enough because the capacitor has to be on the input side. Flicker modules typically go on the sides where the lights are. So while it may seem easy, there is just a few more steps needed to make it all work. So if you are comfortable with running a few wires then you can make it all work. There aren't many plug and play solutions just yet. Head over to The Retrofit Source or Headlight Revolution websites to price out what you need. Those folks can help you out.
  10. I just checked my truck and you are right. The front ambers are not on with the headlights. That makes that part easier I guess. The difficult part now is to find something that works well for the back. Your timing must have been impeccable to capture your signal flash.
  11. Is there a noticeable brightness between running lights and signal? I have purchased lights in the past and it was almost imperceptible when I had my signal on versus the lights being on in running mode. Care to post a short video or something at night to show the difference?
  12. I have Westin Pro Traxx 4" Oval Nerf Bars in black for steps and ProZ LoRoll Premium Roll-Up Tonneau Cover. I don't have pictures of the truck yet because the weather has been so crappy lately. Both were on sale at Autoanything and fit and finish are great. So far I like them. One of these days if we get some decent weather I will take a picture and everything including all the mods that I have done and post them.
  13. Coming from that sound system you have there, the Bose will just make you mad. Take those subs and put them in a box under the seat of your new Silverado and you will be fine probably. I just did this and I am happy. I am even considering throwing another 10" at it. The Bose is great for all around sound, but for audiophiles looking for something special, you will be modifying it later....no doubt.
  14. I traded a 200 Ford F150 with the 5.4 in on my current 2019 Silverado LT. I also have a 2015 Yukon XL SLT2 with the 5.3 and a 2015 Challenger SRT 392. Maybe I am qualified to answer your questions. I have previously owned a 2011 Yukon XL Denali, 2010 GMC Sierra 2500HD 6.0, and a 2006 Sierra SLT. First, lets answer some of those questions.... 1. Is the ride quiet? You bet. You are in a totally different Eco system. My Yukon is pretty quiet too, but that thing is a luxury road king machine. It is purpose built for traveling. If I leave the radio turned down, aside from the normal noises you hear from just about anything; there are no rattles, squeaks, cracks, and just about anything else. This is a far cry from my 2004 F150 and 2010 Sierra. Those were some noisy vehicles. The ride is extremely smooth and the whole truck just feels solid. Previous trucks always felt like the front and the bed had minds of their own and the only way to combat that was to put weight back there. That is not the case here. Very smooth, solid, and comfortable ride. 2. How is the Bose? I had the Bose in my 2006 Sierra, 2010 Sierra, 2011 Yukon, and 2015 Yukon with the Blu-Ray system. My Yukon sounds pretty damn good. The trucks I had? Not so much. The mids to highs were always good, but that little 8 inch woofer always left more to be desired. I always added my own subwoofer to round out the system. As the old saying goes....Got mids, but no lows? Must be Bose.... My 2019 has the basic sound system with 6x9 doors, tweeters in the dash, and some 6x8 in the rear doors. I just moved my old 10 inch Alpine in an underseat box to round out the system. Sounds great to me. At this point I see no reason to go further. I listen to a wide array of music. The only thing I am bummed about is while it has USB-C connections and Android Auto, it doesnt have SiriusXM, Ipod, or Aux-in. I had to go external for those items. Seems weird that even the basic system doesnt have some basic ammenities. I will get to this later.... 3. More power? I am blown away with what they did with the 8-speed and the gearing. The 5.3 is a monster right now. I can only imagine what the 6.2 would be like. Coming from my 2015 Challenger 392, this truck scoots. It has a crap ton of low end and when it reaches the 3-4k RPM range it just gets up and goes. My 2015 Yukon has some torque, but it is a 6-speed and just doesnt have the gears like the 2019 has. They got the power delivery just right. Average driving around town I am anywhere between 16-18 MPG with 24+ out on the highway. You won't be dissapointed with the 5.3 in this 2019, it does very well for itself. 4. Winter? We are just coming out of a bitter winter in the upper midwest. I'd say it handles fine. 5. Towing? Don't know. I don't pull much. 6. LED Lights? I like them. I retrofitted actual projectors and HIDs in almost every vehicle I have ever own. I usually go to the retrofit source and get the mini-H1's and outfit some 35 watt 4k HIDs. GM did a good job with the LEDs. They are bright and have good projection downrange. The high-beam gets where it needs to go. Not quite in the HID projector range, but you have to figure that GM needed to design these lights to work in almost all types of environment. If you live in the midwest where street lights are a luxury, then you may find them to be good enough most of the time. My projectors were designed to dip down out of oncoming traffic, but the downrange in the front of the vehicle was fantastic. In bi-xenon high beam, I could see into tomorrow. Comparing the LEDs to halogen, the LEDs win hands down. The LEDs are a significant upgrade over halogen. If we are talking GM stock LED vs HID? Ermmm....I think my HID projectors are still preferred. As a stock solution though, the LEDs are great. I see no reason I modify or alter them in any way. I may consider supplementing with a light bar or something that can reach further down range and maybe help fill in some of the areas right in front of the truck. Then again, I could not do any of that and probably still be fine too. It's a mixed bag. They are worlds better than halogens though, no question. Last thing to consider about 2019 Silverado's. The options are weird. There are things my truck has that you wouldn't think would be there considering the trim level, but then there are things it doesn't have that I feel are just basic stuff these days. Sunglasses holder? Nope. Garage opener? Nope. LED turn signals/tail lights? Nope. Navigation? Nope. Overall better radio options? Nope. Auto dim rearview? Nope. Wheel well liners? Nope. Bed liner? Nope. Fog lights? Nope. For a truck that MSRPs around $50k and I was OTD around low $40's, I guess I just don't understand. Especially when it has heated steering wheel, heated cloth seats, brake controller, 4WD, G80 locker, LED headlights, remote start, and LED bed lighting. It just has things that don't make sense. I guess because I am used to GMC where almost all that crap is standard. You just never think about it until its not there. So make sure you know what you are willing to live without so you don't have to do what I am doing and find alternate solutions. Hope this helps. Goodluck!
  15. Well I am now corrected. I did a QR scan of my RPO code label located on the driver side door area and I have RPO IOR which is the 7" Infotainment non-bose. I also attached a picture of the audio module and the connectors referenced in the Kicker guide.
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