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Texasdeere

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About Texasdeere

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  • Birthday 11/17/1966

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  1. The UPR I bought is the single sided $200 version. https://uprproducts.com/19-20-gm-chevrolet-gmc-truck-5-3l-single-valve-oil-catch-can-separator-plug-n-play/?_ga=2.152360185.1792572736.1587132329-469327756.1586022756 About $50 more than the JLT. The UPR looks to have more storage capacity and the hoses look more factory too. On mine the hoses are a little too long but I'm sure they would be easy to shorten. I will probably shorten the hoses when I do an air intake kit. The factory air box hide the hoses now. I'm no expert but the dual set up seems a little excessive for stock use engine. I would stay away from systems that put the recovered oil back into the engine.
  2. There is a hanger over on the back drivers side that you will need. The price starts to ad up pretty quickly with the parts but it should be very easy to do.
  3. UPR makes one specifically for the 19-20 5.3 now. I ordered one today.
  4. It looks orientated correctly I just wonder how the valve will hold up over time being on the bottom.
  5. At least the guy took the time to do some nice welds. I think the valves are orientated on the top of the pipe to minimize the affect of moisture over time. Just a guess
  6. The real shame is Borla came up with these improved flappers a few years ago and there is nothing available to buy? It would be great if they sold these individually! https://www.borla.com/blog/2018/03/28/borla-obtains-patent-for-pioneering-pocket-valve-technology/
  7. The valve pivot point is located towards the top of the pipe. It is not like a throttle blade on an intake or carburetor where it pivots in the center of the bore. When the exhaust pressure is high enough it pushes the flap open and into the top of the pipe. The down side of this design is when fully open it blocks nearly 1/3 of the pipe opening. At wide open throttle this could be considered a restriction in exhaust flow.
  8. If the valve is orientated incorrectly just pin it open until you can get it fixed. If it is turned around to the other side, the valve should be towards the bottom of the pipe to flap open with the exhaust flow. Either way I would insist on it being installed the original way or put a small resonator in it's place if the valve becomes to butchered to use anymore.
  9. Pretty sure it is clockwise rotation to full open. The part sticking out should be towards the outside of the truck or passenger side. Meaning you should see it when you look under the pass side of the truck.
  10. You may have to do it yourself or find a shop to fab up your tail pipes. I'm not seeing anyone but GM Performance that splits after the muffler and while it may line up to your OE muffler you'd still have to buy the whole system just for the tail pipes. Maybe get with your Dealer and see if they have a stock dual system "take off" probably bound for the dumpster anyway. It will still have to be modified because of your rear bumper but a lot cheaper and easier in the end. The 6.2 system might have the bigger pipe size you want too.
  11. I took my own advice an tried a Flowmaster 70 Series, supposed to be close to "stock sound levels". Not even close, It might actually be loader than the Corsa muffler! I don't know what it is? Maybe there is no sound deadening in the cab? I'm sure it sound fine outside. The sound is just loud, deep and horrible inside the cab. The DFM isn't helping. It alternates between being followed by a train or a helicopter. I wish I just handed over the cash to my wife and never bought any exhaust. It would have been way more satisfying!
  12. There doesn't seem to be a market for them at least down south. But if you are in the Houston area I would be interested in it. Other than that recycle or cut it up into smaller sections to use later if you ever want to fabricate something.
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