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Found 14 results

  1. Desperate for help! Long-time lurker... I have a '15 Sierra 5.3L with some A/C problems and I can't take the heat! Last summer it wouldn't hold any refrigerant and I didn't fix it right away because I would be gone overseas for 9 months. When I got back, I replaced the infamous condenser that displayed huge amounts of leakage in the same upper right corner. Pulled a vacuum, charged it, PAG oil, etc... it worked perfectly for about 5 months. NOW.... out of nowhere, it's blowing hot air again. I hooked up gauges and initially before doing anything else it showed 100PSI on the low and 150PSI on the high with the compressor refusing to engage. I've replaced the pressure sensor hoping for a cheap fix to no success. Pulled a vacuum (vacuum held for 15 minutes) and attempted to refill, but the compressor refuses to engage. Upon starting the engine the clutch face looks like it is engaging and stops after a few seconds. With the A/C on, the clutch face IS magnetized and seems like it is attempting to engage spinning slowly and making half turns every so often. It doesn't make any weird noises and is free spinning while "engaged". I have read about trying to jump the clutch coil directly with battery power to see if it engages, but I don't know if there is an easier way (i.e. relay) than reaching down to the harness on the compressor. Do I need a new compressor? Or a new clutch? Or can someone smarter than me tell me what I'm doing wrong haha
  2. I have a 2003 Suburban Z71 that I just converted to electric fans. I used a factory wiring harness that I found on ebay, and the fans turn on when the temp hits 190. The truck was tuned by a popular tuner, but the fans will not kick on with the A/C compressor. I have wired in both wires to the pcm connectors. I cannot for the life of me get it to turn on with the A/C compressor. Could it be a bad relay? Could my 2003, not be able to control the fans when the A/C kicks on. I have fried my compressor, and would like to get this figured out before spending money on another. Does the tuner need to turn on the capability for the fans to kick it on? @JennabearI didnt use your tunes for this as I had another option at the time, but I need some answers. If you guys can turn it on, then you will have my money today. Anybody else have any ideas?
  3. Good Evening all. apologize for the novel but bear with me...I need a hand troubleshooting before the local dealer takes me to sizzlers. 2006 GMC Sierra 1500. Dual manual Climate controls. Crew Cab. 5.3 Liter. I have an issue with the air conditioning ceasing to cool while driving after about 20 minutes (what seems). The only way I can get the truck to start cooling again (compressor to re-engage) is if I restart the vehicle ( or if I plug in the OBDII Code tester, more on that later). I have taken the vehicle in for service twice. Once to check the refrigerant level which was fine. Second time they replaced the low pressure cycling switch off the dryer/accumulator (which seemed to be a common fix according the internets). All with no joy. I have a OBDII scanner and it shows no codes. Today I made the connection that the compressor seems to stop when I bring the system off full dual cool to a warmer setting where the truck should be trying to maintain a cabin temp instead of full blast. Once all the fans slow down is when I seem to lose the compressor and the cooling even if I try full cold again. I repeated this failure while driving 3 times. However, while parked this issue doesn't seem to happen cycling the full cold to warmer.. cabin maintaining and back to cold. Very frustrating. Final note: while checking the last time while driving and the compressor had stopped I brought it back to my garage... plugged in the scanner prior to restart to see if a code had popped. When I plugged that scanner in.. the truck did its normal thing being tested (kinda a flash on the dash).. however it also "reset" the compressor and it started again... and cooling like a champ without a restart. So in a nutshell this is where I am. Refrigerant is good. low pressure cycling switch is new on the accumulator. Lose the cooling/compressor when the cabin is not full blast and maintaining cabin temp. Restart will bring compressor back to life or plugging in OBDII scanner. So pretty sure the mechanical side is good. What is next to check or replace? HVAC control head? check another sensor? Please help. Sorry about the novel.. but been at this for a while. Hagendaus
  4. 2005 Duramax Diesel (LLY with only 46,000 miles) Chevrolet Kodiak C5500 medium duty 35' Super C Gulfstream Enduramax Toyhauler RV Just yesterday when I parked it and turned it off the (or what I am assuming is my) airbrake system started cycling on and off. I was hearing the pump cycle on for 90 seconds every 3 minutes just like clock work (off for 3 minutes and then on for 90 seconds). I ended up disconnecting the battery to stop the cycling until I can get it resolved. I am now trying to get a mobile Technician to visit the RV site to diagnose it but am not having much luck in spite of calling the local large truck service centers (GM Medium Duty Dealer, Pilot J, Camping World, North Trail RV etc.). I am wondering if anyone has any ideas on what the problem may be. On the surface I am wondering if there is a sensor that may have calved. Thank You Paul P.S. VIN: 1GBE5U1275F504097
  5. Hello All, 2014 Silvy and no AC, I have read all this forum seems to offer. My system is so low I couldn't just get dye in to confirm the leak, compressor wouldnt kick on. Im going to pull a vacuum to confirm the leak, then charge it that way since the vacuum should get me a jump start on getting the system to take refrigerant. Then find the dye with a light, I suspect condenser, but want to confirm before buying the part. Question for those of you who have done this. Did you add oil on this initial charge to get dye in, to protect the compressor? Or did you only add oil in after the fix on the final charge? If so, how much did you add each time. I've read 2 oz for a compressor replacement, but not how much for a condenser. Thanks, Josh
  6. Manufacturer: Air Lift Company What it is: The RideControl kit from Air Lift is an adjustable air bag system used to keep your pickup’s suspension level while towing and more comfortable when unloaded. Using a compressor and wireless remote, air pressure is adjusted from 5psi up to 100psi, allowing the driver to level their vehicle for various loads or situations. With a level suspension, towing a trailer is easier on your truck, more stable on the road, and safer for you and your cargo. Product Features/Specifications: Up to 2,000 lbs. of load-leveling capacity Eliminates squat, trailer sway, rough ride and bottoming out No frame drilling required Limited Lifetime Warranty Cost: $530 $235 - RideControl Adjustable Air Spring + $295 - WirelessOne Compressor System Installed and tested on: 2011 GMC Sierra All Terrain SLT Extended Cab The whole towing problem Many of us tow with our trucks on a frequent basis. In fact, we bet many of you purchased your truck with towing in mind. However, if you tow more than a couple thousand pounds with a light duty truck on a regular basis you’ll probably get an idea why the pros use 2500HD and 3500HD pickups. However, most of us don’t have a need for a heavy duty truck and are only towing on occasion. While it’s true that our trucks are built for the purpose of hauling stuff around, most of the time they dutifully serve as personal transporters and elaborate grocery getters. GM knows this and as a result, our 1500 Silverado and Sierra pickups are tuned to be comfortable first and to perform while towing and hauling second. That means our trucks suffer from less than desirable traits in both situations. We all know how easily a truck’s rear end bounces around while unloaded. On the flip side, rear end squat is a serious issue when a light duty pickup is pushed to its rated limits. When a truck is pushed to it’s limits and the rear suspension bottoms out you inhibit the shocks ability to dampen bumps. Added weight in the rear also has the effect of lifting up the front end. This wreaks havoc on your steering, tire wear, maneuverability, and most importantly... safety. This is where AirLift comes in. The RideControl system is an aftermarket airbag system used to support your truck’s suspension. Inserted between the rear axle and frame, parallel to your existing shocks, the system adjusts its internal pressure to add support only when your vehicle needs it. We were interested in Airlift’s RideControl system, so we installed one on Project Sierra. Here’s how it went and what we thought. Installing the RideControl and WirelessOne: Installing the RideControl is a task that is entirely possible to do in your driveway with a set of ramps or jack stands. With that said, this is not a beginner project and if you’re not entirely comfortable digging into your truck and running wires, we’d suggest having a professional complete the task. While we won’t go over the entire process, installing the RideControl breaks down into a few easy steps. First we removed the rear tires, the rear inner wheel well liners, and the rear spare tire. Then we mounted the brackets to the frame and leaf spring along with a deflated airbag. The next step is to run your airlines. Both bags will be connected to the same compressor. We ran the lines from each airbag to a ‘T’, which in turn had another ‘T’. One end of the hose will be run to the air compressor while the other is tucked behind the rear bumper and equipped with a schrader valve for emergency manual inflation. We then carefully cut the inner wheel well liner to fit the mounting bracket and reinstalled it. We then installed the air compressor and controller manifold under our spare tire. We chose this location because it was protected and far enough away we cannot hear the compressor running from inside the cabin. Lastly, we ran the wiring harness to the engine compartment and connected it to a keyed power source. After we confirmed the system inflated the airbags and none of our lines leaked, we reattached the wheels and buttoned the project up. A smooth ride, all the time After installation, we couldn’t wait to test our new air suspension. As we accelerated out of the shop we could immediately feel a distinct difference in the way the Sierra handled. With our Sierra unloaded we got to work testing every available air pressure setting we could. The system has a minimum pressure of 5psi and should never be driven completely deflated. Conversely, the compressor has a maximum setting of 100psi, for when you’re taking your vehicle to its limit. We found that the RideControl system significantly changed the unloaded driving behaviour of our Sierra for the better when set to between 5psi and 10psi. The air bags helped our truck’s suspension soak up bumps and settled down axle bounce at the same time. The result was a vehicle that drove with less flex, more composure, and was more comfortable than stock. We then hooked up a dual axle 12-foot enclosed trailer stuffed with an ATV and its related equipment. This combination weighed approximately 2,500lbs. After increasing the pressure in the airbags until the truck and trailer were level we set out to see how this combination handled. With a trailer hitched up in our rear view mirror, the RideControl system shined. We immediately noticed how level our Sierra sat, even with the extra weight in the back. This level position preserved the correct steering angle of the front end, brake distribution, and helped reduce drive line shock during transitions from acceleration to braking. In general, our Sierra acted as if it was given a huge confidence boost.The AirLift system stiffened our Sierra’s suspension and added new found stability and capability to our last generation truck. Worth noting, however, is when we went to take video of the airbags operating, the unit stopped working. We couldn’t figure out why, and since the remote still lit up we assumed it was functioning correctly. After checking everything else, we decided to replace the remote's batteries, and voila, everything came back to life. Because of this, we highly recommend keeping a spare set of batteries to avoid any mid tow remote battery failures. Conclusion Not just for towing, Airlift’s RideControl Airbag System improves our Sierra’s ride and handling every time we get behind the wheel. Before installation we were dubious that this product would provide any measurable benefit beyond substantial towing and hauling. We were wrong. While we love the added stability while towing a fully loaded trailer, we really appreciate the added stiffness the RideControl system adds to our trucks rear suspension when running errands or driving to work. Our rear axle dances less on washboard dirt roads and sucks up potholes better than before. And with the new K2 trucks sharing much of the same chassis design as our 2011, they too would benefit from this serious upgrade. If you tow more than a few times a year and don’t want to compromise your truck’s everyday driving ability, then the ride control system from AirLift is just what the doctor ordered.
  7. The Merva Brothers GM-Trucks.com 9/3/2015 Product: Air Lift RideControl Adjustable Air Spring (59565) & Airlift WirelessOne Compressor System Editor's Note: This product was provided at no cost for the purposes of a review. We only publish our honest opinions and give no consideration for the gratis product. Manufacturer: Air Lift Company What it is: The RideControl kit from Air Lift is an adjustable air bag system used to keep your pickup’s suspension level while towing and more comfortable when unloaded. Using a compressor and wireless remote, air pressure is adjusted from 5psi up to 100psi, allowing the driver to level their vehicle for various loads or situations. With a level suspension, towing a trailer is easier on your truck, more stable on the road, and safer for you and your cargo. Product Features/Specifications: Up to 2,000 lbs. of load-leveling capacity Eliminates squat, trailer sway, rough ride and bottoming out No frame drilling required Limited Lifetime Warranty Cost: $530 $235 - RideControl Adjustable Air Spring + $295 - WirelessOne Compressor System Installed and tested on: 2011 GMC Sierra All Terrain SLT Extended Cab The whole towing problem Many of us tow with our trucks on a frequent basis. In fact, we bet many of you purchased your truck with towing in mind. However, if you tow more than a couple thousand pounds with a light duty truck on a regular basis you’ll probably get an idea why the pros use 2500HD and 3500HD pickups. However, most of us don’t have a need for a heavy duty truck and are only towing on occasion. While it’s true that our trucks are built for the purpose of hauling stuff around, most of the time they dutifully serve as personal transporters and elaborate grocery getters. GM knows this and as a result, our 1500 Silverado and Sierra pickups are tuned to be comfortable first and to perform while towing and hauling second. That means our trucks suffer from less than desirable traits in both situations. We all know how easily a truck’s rear end bounces around while unloaded. On the flip side, rear end squat is a serious issue when a light duty pickup is pushed to its rated limits. When a truck is pushed to its limits and the rear suspension bottoms out you inhibit the shocks ability to dampen bumps. Added weight in the rear also has the effect of lifting up the front end. This wreaks havoc on your steering, tire wear, maneuverability, and most importantly... safety. This is where AirLift comes in. The RideControl system is an aftermarket airbag system used to support your truck’s suspension. Inserted between the rear axle and frame, parallel to your existing shocks, the system adjusts its internal pressure to add support only when your vehicle needs it. We were interested in Airlift’s RideControl system, so we installed one on Project Sierra. Here’s how it went and what we thought. Installing the RideControl and WirelessOne: Installing the RideControl is a task that is entirely possible to do in your driveway with a set of ramps or jack stands. With that said, this is not a beginner project and if you’re not entirely comfortable digging into your truck and running wires, we’d suggest having a professional complete the task. While we won’t go over the entire process, installing the RideControl breaks down into a few easy steps. First we removed the rear tires, the rear inner wheel well liners, and the rear spare tire. Then we mounted the brackets to the frame and leaf spring along with a deflated airbag. It's worth nothing no drilling of the frame is required. The next step is to run your airlines. Both bags will be connected to the same compressor. We ran the lines from each airbag to a ‘T’, which in turn had another ‘T’. One end of the hose will be run to the air compressor while the other is tucked behind the rear bumper and equipped with a schrader valve for emergency manual inflation. We then carefully cut the inner wheel well liner to fit the mounting bracket and reinstalled it. We then installed the air compressor and controller manifold under our spare tire. We chose this location because it was protected and far enough away we cannot hear the compressor running from inside the cabin. Lastly, we ran the wiring harness to the engine compartment and connected it to a keyed power source. After we confirmed the system inflated the airbags and none of our lines leaked, we reattached the wheels and buttoned the project up. A smooth ride, all the time After installation, we couldn’t wait to test our new air suspension. As we accelerated out of the shop we could immediately feel a distinct difference in the way the Sierra handled. With our Sierra unloaded we got to work testing every available air pressure setting we could. The system has a minimum pressure of 5psi and should never be driven completely deflated. Conversely, the compressor has a maximum setting of 100psi, for when you’re taking your vehicle to its limit. We found that the RideControl system significantly changed the unloaded driving behaviour of our Sierra for the better when set to between 5psi and 10psi. The air bags helped our truck’s suspension soak up bumps and settled down axle bounce at the same time. The result was a vehicle that drove with less flex, more composure, and was more comfortable than stock. We then hooked up a dual axle 12-foot enclosed trailer stuffed with an ATV and its related equipment. This combination weighed approximately 2,500lbs. After increasing the pressure in the airbags until the truck and trailer were level we set out to see how this combination handled. With a trailer hitched up in our rear view mirror, the RideControl system shined. We immediately noticed how level our Sierra sat, even with the extra weight in the back. This level position preserved the correct steering angle of the front end, brake distribution, and helped reduce drive line shock during transitions from acceleration to braking. In general, our Sierra acted as if it was given a huge confidence boost.The AirLift system stiffened our Sierra’s suspension and added new found stability and capability to our last generation truck. Worth noting, however, is when we went to take video of the airbags operating, the unit stopped working. We couldn’t figure out why, and since the remote still lit up we assumed it was functioning correctly. After checking everything else, we decided to replace the remote's batteries, and voila, everything came back to life. Because of this, we highly recommend keeping a spare set of batteries to avoid any mid tow remote battery failures. Conclusion Not just for towing, Airlift’s RideControl Airbag System improves our Sierra’s ride and handling every time we get behind the wheel. Before installation we were dubious that this product would provide any measurable benefit beyond substantial towing and hauling. We were wrong. While we love the added stability while towing a fully loaded trailer, we really appreciate the added stiffness the RideControl system adds to our trucks rear suspension when running errands or driving to work. Our rear axle dances less on washboard dirt roads and sucks up potholes better than before. And with the new K2 trucks sharing much of the same chassis design as our 2011, they too would benefit from this serious upgrade. If you tow more than a few times a year and don’t want to compromise your truck’s everyday driving ability, then the ride control system from AirLift is just what the doctor ordered.
  8. So I have a 2015 Silverado. I’ve put a 2.5” leveling kit on it, 285/70/17 tires and American racing Baja wheels. Since leveling it anything I put any considerable amount of weight in the back it squats more than I’d like so after some research and a buddy having the firestone riderite airbags I’ve decided to go with them as well. My question I have is, where is the best location for the compressor? Any tips and advice is greatly appreciated.
  9. So, I decided to buy and test a $20 dollar portable air compressor from Costco, for when I air down my tires when off roading and I have to re inflate back up Take a guess, gentlemen, how long will it last? 1 week? 1 month? 1 day? Its performance is disappointing at least (33 inch tire, from 15 to 35 psi in over 8 minutes, and overheated) but again, it was $20.00 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sHua_C3KPPc
  10. I have an issue with my air ride on my Yukon Denali. Here are the details. New rear air shocks approx. 1 year ago, no problems after replacement. At some point compressor stopped running----pulled battery to reset with no luck, compressor clicks but will not run. No error on dashboard One shock is fully extended (driver rear), other shock is completely lowered (passenger rear) Both bags are soft. I have pulled all connections from shocks and replaced the complete compressor and still having same issue. Not sure what to check next and how to check. Thanks in advance!!
  11. Nothing came up in a search, so I've decided to make a thread about the procedure to replace the compressor in my 2000 Silverado with a 5.3. Some background info: In May of 2012 the A/C was recharged and was cooling perfectly until it began to disengage as if it was low on freon. It was doing this for a week or so, and in the mean time it began to smell "funny". It would be blowing ice cold then hot, then the compressor would engage again and it would be fine. Then it just shut off permanently and hasn't been working since, and I haven't needed to replace it since because I barely drove the truck last summer, but now she's my main car and I'll be replacing the a/c as soon as possible. Do you guys know of any great tutorials online? Such as videos or whatever, and even as much as advice as possible would be fantastic too. And at this point I am only assuming that it's the compressor, but I'm not 100% sure since it could just be the clutch itself? Tyi P.S. I apologize if this thread is in the incorrect section, please move if necessary.
  12. So I'm a little confused on the HVAC controls on my LTZ. In the good old days (GMT-400 and maybe 800's) you could switch the AC compressor off by pushing the AC button, no matter how hot or cold you set the temp knob or button to. On the current truck that doesn't seem to be the case. If I set the temp to say, 67, the truck keeps on cooling it seems, no matter if I have AC button on or not. So what gives? Obviously the HVAC system is basically doing its own thing to keep the temp where I set it. This is with the system NOT set to auto, btw. Can someone in the know shed some light on the technical operation of the system? Maybe a PDF from GM explains it somewhere?
  13. I need help I have a 2006 chevy silverado z71. A.C. fan stopped blowing i changed the resistor now my compressor is not getting power to it it at all i tried by passing the low pressure switch still nothing. I took a test light and im not getting power anywhere. I tested the high and low pressure switches no power i tested where the relay goes in at no power there either. No idea whats going on any info?
  14. OK, this is my last hope. Summer is here. The a/c compressor went out in our 1995 C2500 Extcab Sierra pickup, 5.7L 350. We replaced the compressor, accumulator, condenser, hoses, o-rings, orifice tube, and the climate control. We have spent a lot of money and have been through hell with this thing. Well, the clutch is not turning on the brand new compressor!!! What the heck? Any help? PLEASE!!!
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