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Found 15 results

  1. "Opinion ‘Car Talk’ host: Independent auto shops deserve the right to repair your car September 28, 2022 at 7:00 a.m. EDT (Washington Post staff illustration; images by iStock) Ray Magliozzi is one half of NPR’s show “Car Talk,” a longtime independent repair-shop owner, a Dear Car Talk columnist and a car reviewer on CarTalk.com. When your car breaks, what do you do? Okay, after you utter a certain word? You have to decide where to take the car to get it fixed, right? You really have two choices. You can go to the dealership or an independent repair shop. However, some car manufacturers don’t want to share key information for diagnosing and fixing cars with independent shops — and that’s something that’s not only bad for repair shops but also bad for you. As a radio host who has advised thousands on their car problems and as an independent shop owner myself, I know all too well that car owners benefit when they have more choices. Congress is considering a national “right-to-repair” law, and lawmakers need to pass it to protect your rights as a consumer. Story continues below advertisement Back in the old days, when people were still switching over from traveling by mastodon, you repaired cars with your eyes, ears, nose and hands — and, if you were desperate, a Chilton repair manual. Now, you often repair a car by first plugging a computer into the on-board-diagnostics port and seeing what the computer tells you is broken. So, what’s the problem? Carmakers and their dealerships want to maintain control of modern diagnostic tools, which forces customers to come to them for repairs. Even though independents are willing to pay to license these tools, dealers see an advantage in exclusivity. Dealerships have always had certain advantages. They have better coffee in their waiting rooms. Heck, they have waiting rooms. They have clean restrooms that don’t double as auxiliary air-filter storage. They also work on your particular make of car all day, every day. So they might be familiar with an oddball problem because they’ve worked on 4,000 Camrys. Story continues below advertisement Independent shops are small businesses, run by individuals — some of whom are terrific people and mechanics and some of whom will blame your car troubles on demonic possession and give you essential oils to fix it. But independent shops have their own advantage: price. Their labor and parts costs are usually much lower — hey, who do you think is ultimately paying for the dealerships’ coffee and fancy couches? Some research has found that dealers, on average, charged as much as 20 percent more than independent shops for the same repairs. This article was featured in the Opinions A.M. newsletter. Sign up here for a digest of opinions in your inbox six days a week. There’s also the matter of distance. Not every town in the United States has a stop light, let alone a dealership for every car brand. There are 16,752 franchised car dealers in the United States, according to the National Automobile Dealers Association, but there are nearly 240,000 repair shops — meaning that for a lot of people, an independent shop is the only nearby option. Story continues below advertisement At Car Talk, there are times we’ll strongly recommend an independent shop for standard work like brakes, shocks, the engine and regular service. And there are times we’ll recommend going to the dealership, like when you have a particularly rare problem that might be unique to your make and model. But at the end of the day, you should take your car to the dealer to be fixed because you want to not because dealers have hoarded all the key information. Beyond the information needed to diagnose and fix your car, dealerships also want to maintain control of your car’s telematics. What are telematics? Well, now that everything is connected to the internet, your car can notify your dealer when your car needs an oil change or has a blown sensor. Using the software they’re denying to independent shops, the dealer can then diagnose the trouble code, call you and schedule a repair. Most modern cars already have this ability. Car manufacturers point to the importance of keeping your car’s data safe — including your location, say — as a reason to deny independent shops access to these tools and codes. They are right about the need for data security, but part of privacy is that you should be the one to decide who has access to your data. Story continues below advertisement At least 17 states have laws on the books stating that your vehicle’s data belongs to you. Many independent repair shops will need to invest in tools to keep customer data secure, but just because they’ll need to invest doesn’t mean they can’t compete with dealers. Lack of choice — and competition — is never good for the consumer. So consumer groups and independent shops are promoting what they call right-to-repair legislation, guaranteeing consumers more choice by requiring automakers to license their data with independent repair shops. The voters in my fair state of Massachusetts approved just such a law in 2020. In 2021, 27 states introduced or passed similar legislation. Beyond those state laws, there’s a national push to protect consumers and independent shops. H.R. 6570, a national right-to-repair bill, has been sitting with the House Energy and Commerce Committee for months. My Car Talk colleagues and I know not everyone will support right-to-repair laws. Dealerships won’t like the level playing field. Mechanics might not like how much work they’ll actually have to do. Still, this is an issue everyone else can get behind. If you own something, you should be able to choose where to repair it. "
  2. ****6/27/22 New info on parts and labor times - this video will be updated to provide more current info. *** 5/16/22 - With all of the negative talk and concern over this service at 150k miles for the duramax 3.0, I felt the need to figure out how much it really would cost. And of course, I put together a quick video. Here are the details as of 5/16/2022 Based on my math (numbers may vary depending on your area Labor $1095 Parts $ 200 GM Part Numbers Oil Pump Belt - 55493234 Oil Pump Sprocket Bolt - Coming Soon Rear Engine Cover - 55515618 RTV Sealant 19369831
  3. Adding a zone 6.5 inch lift on my 2014 sierra. It has roughly 135k miles on engine. I just replaced front struts and sway bar links (even though kit comes with new links)..realized that after fact. I have steel cast control arms and curious what I should replace? A lot of people on facebook suggest the congnito or zone upper control arms but they are $500 just for the set. I was wondering if I could replace just the ball joints/tie rod ends when I install kit and then down the road replace UCA's with cognito...or is the stock cast steel control arm and ball joint all one piece? Meaning i cant just replace the ball joint? Just looking for some feedback and suggestions. i will have my son in truck a lot so that is why i want to be extra sure I have a solid front end. Any feedback, your pictures of 6.5 inch lifts, and experience with maintenance is appreciated. Been awhile since i posted on here!!
  4. Currently working on a 6.0L V8 (2000 LQ9 I believe) and cannot seem to locate the PCV valve and hose (see image for reference). I was under the impression that they weren’t integrated into the valve cover until around 2005. The body of this truck is a 2000 Sierra 1500 but the engine was replaced from the 4.8 to the 6.0 at some point so I’m guessing for a lot of the component locations. First time poster, any helps appreciated.
  5. Hi there, I bought a used 2011 Chevy Tahoe 4WD with 151k. As soon the car is released and street legal in Germany, I do a full oil/fluid replacement incl. all filters + spark plugs and spark plug wires. In regards to my engine oil change, this is my plan: 1st engine oil change I plan to use an oil sludge remover to "clean" the engine from inside. Its called Liqui Moly Oil Sludge Flush. With the new engine oil, I plan to add Liqui Moly Hydraulic Lifter Additive . 2nd engine oil change (...when its due next time) I plan to use another engine cleaner called RAVENOL Professional Engine Cleaner to make sure that all debris are removed as much as possible. With the new engine oil, I plan to add an additive called TriboTEX Original In regards to coolant change I want to use a coolant system cleaner and a radiator stop leakage which can be used preventively. I am also going to permanently disabling the AFM on software level done by a US car tuner. I heard/ read that the Vortec 5.3L engine in those 3rd Gen Tahoes tends to build up oil sludge so I thought it might be a good idea for a good engine flush. Anything pro or contra? Any feedback is highly appreciated. Please stay safe and healthy! Niels
  6. Hey all, I am considering changing out all my fluids as I just hit 25k and this is mostly for peace of mind. Truck is 2017 Z71, 6 SP. trans. First, it appears most people do a pan drop drain and fill with gasket replace. Is that beneficial, getting some new fluid in while like 50% is still old/original? Second in the manual for capacities, I do not see trans listed, how do I know how much it even holds total? Thanks.
  7. Want to drain and fill my coolant, wondering how much the radiator holds? I know specs say the cooling system is 16.6 quarts, but how much will come out of a drain so I have enough on hand? Also, I am assuming DexCool from dealer is concentrate and not pre mixed right? How do you guys mix to ensure 50/50? Do you mix into a spare bottle or something first? Thanks!
  8. I bought a gallon of Dexron VI from amazon because of price. Was going to do my transfer case and noticed the gallon pump I have is too small for it. The jig has a huge lid! Anyone know a pump that works on these?
  9. Planning on changing out fluid in my front and rear diffs. Should I put anything on the threads of the plugs when going back in? thank you.
  10. Good morning guys, Obviously I'm new to the forums, so thank you in advance for your understanding! A little background on my situation -- I always make sure to maintain my vehicle to the best of my ability (both proactively and within my financial budget), but my Chevy Silverado just hit it's 75,000 mile mark with no previous transmission fluid maintenance. 2011 Chevy Silverado 1500 (Standard Work Vehicle) Pre-Certified with 3,008 miles on it, pretty much brand-new -- Purchased in Oct, 2013 4.3 Liters V6 Engine 75,600 miles currently The only thing it's ever towed is the smallest Uhaul for about 600/miles, and sod back in the day. For the past couple of years I've only driven it to and from work (50 miles round trip in city/highway), but for the most part this past year my new place of employment is super close, so that dwindled to around 25 miles round-trip. I've only ever replaced the engine oil and filter regularly, and tires a year ago, so when it comes to how I should maintenance the transmission oil, that's a bit foreign to me unfortunately. I've heard if you make it passed 70k with no issues, it's not wise to flush it out entirely, but more so the 50/50 (old/new) method? I would like some advice from you tenured vets on this, and to see if I should take it to the Chevy dealer or a transmission specialist? Thanks again!
  11. By: Zane Merva & Matt Blouin Copyright 2015 - GM-Trucks.com The colder weather of winter can be punishing on your pickup’s battery. If your truck doesn't start with the same enthusiasm this spring as it did last fall, your battery is to blame. After two months of temperatures regularly below zero-degrees Fahrenheit, the stock battery in our Sierra was in rough shape. Even leaving a cell-phone charger plugged in overnight was too much for our old battery to handle. Luckily, changing your battery is one of the easiest pieces of maintenance to perform on your Silverado or Sierra. You can buy a new battery at any auto parts store and most large box stores. Consult with a compatibility chart or sales associate to ensure you purchase a compatible battery. Most newer Silverado and Sierra take a "Group 78" style battery. Aside from the correct type, it’s important to note the Cold Cranking Amps (CCA) of your stock battery and buy a new battery that is at least equivalent. If you live in a cold region or have hooked up accessories to your battery, getting a higher CCA-rated battery is a great idea. Never buy a battery that is smaller or has a CCA rating that is lower than stock. Tools needed 13mm socket (battery hold down) 10mm socket (battery cables) ½-in socket (body bracing) 6-in socket extension Safety Glasses Mechanic’s Gloves Applicable Vehicles 2007-2015+ Chevrolet Silverado and GMC Sierra 1500 Time required 10-15 minutes Estimated Cost $150-175 depending on battery, not including refundable core charge Skills Required Beginner Technical Ability Able to lift 50lbs over shoulder height Warnings and Precautions Never allow a tool to connect the two battery terminals together Step One - Prepare The first step in any project is to prepare your work space. Gather the required tools and safety equipment. Park your vehicle in a place where you have adequate light and you won't have to move it for the duration of the project. Some vehicles have security codes or radio settings that need to be noted before disconnecting vehicle power. Step Two - Unscrew the engine bay bracing The battery in the older 2007-2013 body styles and newer 2014+ body styles are surrounded by bracing. While the designs are different, all model years require a 1/2-inch socket to remove the bolts. Remove the bracing and set aside in a safe place. Step Three - Remove the battery hold down The battery is held in place by a single 13mm bolt and block. Simply unscrew the hold-down using a socket and the 6-inch extension, Set aside in a safe place. Step Four - Disconnect the old battery Now, disconnect the battery using a 10mm socket. Be careful to remove the negative terminal first and never allow the positive and negative wires or terminals to touch. Step Five - Switch the old and new battery The battery weights around 40lbs, so make sure you are comfortable lifting this much weight to around shoulder height. Step Six - Reassemble in reverse order Simply reattach your battery, battery hold down, and engine bay bracing in the reverse order. Step Seven - Restore settings Replacing the battery will most likely reset your pickup’s clock, radio favorites and memory seat settings that you may have customized. Take a moment before you hit the road again to restore these settings in a safe place while parked.
  12. I have yet to find a good app or site that does what I want so being a web developer I am considering building a web app for tracking maintenance, mods, fuel fill ups, etc for my truck. Ability to add receipts and an image for documentation purposes etc. Wondering if anyone else would be interested in using such an app?
  13. What does everyone do to keep track of their maintenance and mods they do? I have the standard file cabinet filled with receipts etc, but I want something more as I plan on keeping this new truck for a long while. I started looking at website apps, because I am a web developer and like that kind of thing. Anyone used any of those? I have come across a few such as Motortab and Cargly They look kinda cool! Was also considering building my own app, which would be neat as I could then make it do whatever and get input from folks like you who may use it for features etc. Anyway, would love your thoughts on keeping tabs, thanks!
  14. Brought my truck into the shop due to a "Service 4wd" light, as well as the selector switch acting up. Mechanic inspected the transfer case, found it shot with a lot of loose slack on the chain. He indicated it was an NP8 transfer case going to a M30 transmission. Could someone help with the part number naming on these? Trying to find a replacement online but don't want to buy the wrong one. Open to recommendations where to find the best refurb/used case as well.
  15. I have a 2014 LT Silverado 5.3 litre, Sport Edition, with approx 80,000 miles. Today I noticed a pool of black, sticky substance below the right, rear of the truck. I looked under the vehicle, and found black splatter marks all over. The viscosity thickens as it dries. After cleaning the underside, I think was able to find the leak. It is coming from the front joint on the leaf springs. Forgive my ignorance, I do not know a lot about auto repair, and that is the best way I can describe the problem. None of my gauges are signaling that there is an issue. It might be helpful to know that approximately 2 weeks ago, I ran over a metal ladder on the freeway, which blew out my tire. But, I didn't notice any other damage. I have attached some pictures. Can anyone tell me what the problem is, cause, how to fix, is it a diy project, etc?? Thank you, This is my first ever post. I'm not even sure that I am doing this correctly.. I apologize in advance Pics 1, 2, 3 - (Leak 1-3) - Leak from leaf spring joint Pics 3 and 4 - Just showing splatter marks from leak Pics 5, 6, 7, and 9 - Different angles of the leak Pic 8 - Overview of leaf springs
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