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starman8tdc

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starman8tdc last won the day on September 13 2017

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About starman8tdc

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  1. Old New Guy

    Fox island huh? I almost acquired some property out there. Someone wanted to trade me a couple of lots for .... I don't remember what. A car? A boat? an ATV? Something like that. One of my brothers lives in about 30 minutes from there. Anyway, whats it like living out there? How is the crime level?
  2. Fuel Injectors ?

    Good info, thanks for posting. From what I have read, the direct injections systems are definitely superior to all the predecessors. I have been working on various cars for decades, but I have not had any issues come up with that particular fuel system. I will definitely study the system well before taking one apart.
  3. Old New Guy

    Nice ride. What part of Washington do you hail from?
  4. Heat cycled it several times and and it around the block. A few things surprised me: Despite all the various hoses and gaskets that were disconnected and replaced - there were zero leaks. Normally you would anticipate at least one drip. The whole setup is super quiet. MUCH quieter than before. Even the clutch fan is almost silent, even when engaged and pushing lots of air. Weird. Absolutely NO burping needed on the cooling system. I filled up the coolant, fired it up - and that was it. After several heat cycles and burping procedures it didn't need any more coolant at all.
  5. 85 MPH? Wow. Best I see around these parts is 70, and that's only on one interstate highway. Standard highway speeds is 60. Anyway, as for the knocking - I would check for a loose finder liner, mud flap, loose front wheel bearings, loose skid or inspection plates, loose upper or lower fan shroud, etc. At 85 MPH, your rig is experiencing some serious wind turbulence, so I would suspect that something is loose and knocking around. Are you sure its not a misfire or a transmission shudder - or something like that?
  6. Front end popping

    Could be something like a body panel rubbing, or maybe something weird like the steering shaft. One thing you might try, would be to beat the hell out of the suspension and frame. Run the truck over some train tracks real fast, or maybe a bunch of large speed bumps. Maybe do some off-road'n. Hopefully, that would either make the problem go away, or at least make the issue more prominent - thus making it easier to locate. Plus if there is something that is about to fail, it will happen when your ready for it, rather than on the freeway.
  7. I would start with checking the connections at the computer, is there any water in there? You might take a look at all the main wiring harness grounds as well. Cleaning your battery connections might be worth doing as well.
  8. bug/hood deflector

    I have seen that clear film on a several rigs. Its only visible from up close, and it doesn't look bad regardless of the distance. It would stop small rocks, but I'm guessing larger ones would easily penetrate it and chip the paint.
  9. Installation of the water pump:
  10. This solution to the rear heater core flush was inspired by the pliers idea that "no HD" posted:
  11. Replacing the head is a pretty extreme measure if you have not isolated the exact cause of the problem. Replacing the entire engine seems to be even more extreme. If you are willing to throw that kind of time and money at it, I would recommend just sending it to a diagnostic shop. For a couple hundred bucks, you will have your answer. Shot in the dark, but I would say that IF you have AFM, then that would be the place to start.
  12. Hmm. Ya, I have seen those plastic "T's" brake before. Maybe I should swap them out for metal "T's".
  13. Fuel Injectors ?

    I would pull the plug on that particular dealer. I think a fresh set of eyes on the problem is warranted at this point. Maybe another Chevy dealer tech has seen this problem before?
  14. Front end popping

    I have no idea if the springs are the issue, I was was just throwing ideas out there. I have seen front springs on vehicles rotate and cause popping, but I don't know if your vehicle is susceptible to that problem. Both my Chevys have torsion bars, so I cant go out there and test any theories on my vehicles. Every time I inspect, diagnose, or shake down a front end, I always have someone sitting in the drivers seat to turn the wheel back and fourth while I look everything over. If you don't have a helper, you could tie ropes to the steering wheel, and run them out the driver and passenger windows, and down under the vehicle so you can move the wheel back and fourth while your under the rig, but its not as effective. I ran into a squeaking problem in the front end of a Lincoln Town Car yesterday. Without someone turning the wheel for me, it would have been pretty difficult to locate the problem (upper left ball joint).
  15. Front end popping

    Hi, If you have torsion bars up front, then there is no need to read this post any further. If you have coil springs in the front: A customer came to me once with a nearly Brand New Nissan Sentra. They had a weird popping sound coming from the front end whenever you would make fairly sharp low speed turns. Les Schwab had diagnosed it as bad struts, and replaced them both from about $800. The exact same popping sound came back the next day. It took about 2 minutes to diagnose. The upper part of the coil spring was slipping against the upper spring seat. As the wheel and strut turned, it would put rotational forces into the spring, and the top of the spring would go "pop" "pop" "pop" as it jumped to the next position rather than smoothly slipping against the seat. Then when you turned back the other direction, it would do the same thing. There are a few simple options available to fix this problem. Spray the upper spring seat with a little WD40 so that it will slip smoothly and eliminate the noise. Apply glue or sealant to the top of the coil spring to prevent it from slipping against the seat. Les Schwab charged these people $800 to not fix the problem. I charged them $0.00 to diagnose and fix the problem. If you have springs up front, hopefully that will solve the problem. If you have torsion bars up front, and you are still reading this, sorry to waste your time. Either way, good luck on your repairs.
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