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OldChevyNut

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About OldChevyNut

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    Enthusiast

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  • Name
    Phillip
  • Location
    CA
  • Drives
    2019 GMC Canyon SLT Crew Cab V6 2wd
  1. Easy Oil Change!

    Thanks for the fast response and comment. Placed and order and got one coming. We just recently took delivery of a 2019 Canyon we special ordered, and when it went over 600 miles I changed the oil, found some small fragments. Wanted a good magnet to catch all that stuff. Thanks again.
  2. Easy Oil Change!

    Wow ... Thanks guys ... After getting specifics on the neodymium magnet grades used the 2 of the 12 x 1.75 drain plugs found so far, I'm just ordered the Dimple, but the price is really high. Then again, that one has a very high grade magnet, but the numbers on the Mishimoto are right up there also but I couldn't find a 12 x 1.75. I also wanted one with a replaceable o-ring, instead of a crush washer, which can be a source of drips caused by expansion/contraction from changing engine temps. By the way, if anyone ever asks, those neodymium magnets can be created to stand temperatures up to 1500 degrees F, and never lose their strength. So they'll likely outlast the vehicle, by several hundred years.
  3. Easy Oil Change!

    Anyone know where I can get a magnetic drain plug for my 2019 Canyon 3.6 V6.? The standard one is OK, but with first oil change found magnetic stuff in oil.
  4. Wanted a 19 Canyon, couldn't find one the way I wanted so special order SLT loaded. MSRP $38K, 2K off in incentives. But because I knew dealers get 3% GM kickback on each sale for any given month, plus paid cash, used that to lower pre-tax cost to just under $35,200.00. By the way, order time was 4 weeks 6 days from placement to drive away in Feb 2019. Also, I was told by sales manager that they move 42-44 2019 Colorados/Canyons per month, 16-18 Silverado/Sierra per month, and average delta cost between Sierra/Canyon with comparable config was $14,100.00 lower for Canyon (from msrp's). Otherwise, getting a good deal is up to the individual, and sometimes even pure chance at buying when special offers are happening or dealer wants to move inventory. If you have great credit and big down or even full-price cash, HIGHLY RECOMMEND dealing with sales manager if possible. You'll get a much better deal, less back-and-forth than through salesman. Also, if financing, get pre-approved with somebody, like credit union, bank, or finance co. Otherwise finance person will try to screw you with very high interest loans that they get kickbacks on. Last but not least, the same dealer had 17 leftover new 2018 Silverado/Sierra trucks, various models, colors, and such. Selling in $36k-43K range (pre-tax). Highest price one was a dark red Sierra Denali 4x fully loaded. I should have got the Denali, it was nice ...
  5. Check out the following links: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HVdxXHb_KdY https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wsrH2kCyQ3w But basically, I just used dental floss in a sawing motion to remove the emblems, then some 3M adhesive cleaner I got at Walmart to get the adhesive residue off the paint. I'd also suggest you use very soft cloth to remove residual adhesive, like a soft micro fiber, instead of a regular towel or paper towel, which can scratch surfaces. I got the 3M remover because when I first used Goo Gone, it didn't work that well and I rubbed too hard and scratched the surface of the clear coat a little. The 3M stuff seemed to work better. Afterward, I cleaned re-waxed the applicable panels, and they look good. Sorry, didn't remove any decals yet, so can't comment on those.
  6. 2017 Canyon 8 Speed Absolutely Horrible

    To the best of my knowledge and experience, the posting I made provides factual guidance for initiating and conducting an arbitration process, and I make no apology to anyone for what I posted. In making the posting, I did so because I have considerable knowledge of the arbitration process gained prior to retirement, and a relative asked me to make a synopsis of the general process available on-line. Her best friends had a 2017 Colorado V6 8 speed (8L45) that exhibited shuddering and rough shifting, and had seen extensive repair attempts with several dealerships being involved. When they ultimately wanted to begin the arbitration process, they encountered many roadblocks because they had no information guidelines to go by. Also, prior to retirement, I have worked for Ford at the Romulus plant as a contract engineer in flow processes, and while doing so, gained information on the 8L90/8L45 series that described internal design characteristics that will produce some level of operational and reliability issues sometime with the useful life of the EVERY unit. GM knew of the problems very early (2014, perhaps before ?), but at the time, were pressured to get something on the market, so a flawed unit was released for use and basically the same unit is still being produced today. DESIGN FLAWS EXIST IN EVERY UNIT. THAT'S A WELL DOCUMENTED FACT. The severity of problems encountered will vary from unit to unit, from almost no problems, to very severe problems. And one of the compounding issues is that many owners simply ignore or fail to recognize unusual or problematic operation, or operate the vehicle in circumstances where issues are less likely to surface or the severity of issue will be less, and those owners never report issues and/or continue to claim that nothing is wrong. I wish no ill will to anyone, and if someone chooses to purchase one of the affected vehicles, I very much wish the best of luck with the vehicle. But I also know that new vehicle owners will have a 1-in-5 chance of getting a unit that will exhibit SERIOUS OPERATIONAL AND RELIABILITY PROBLEMS, sometimes very soon after delivery but in most cases with 12,000 miles. And unfortunately in some cases, the only recourse is to begin the arbitration process for problems that have been acknowledged by the manufacturer as not fixable. In those cases, I very much hope my general description of the arbitration process will be helpful, but because exact conditions and requirements and processes vary from region to region, I also recommend obtaining specific information on the requirements applicable in the region in which they reside. By the way, my relatives friends won their case, and were awarded buy-back. However, because they first took the vehicle in for repair at 9,233 miles instead of when they first noticed problems at about 1,000 miles, the amount paid was far less than the amount they could have received had they reported the problem at first occurrence. So a word to the wise, at the first sign of an issue take it to your dealer and formalize the mileage at which the issue was first reported. This applies to ANY issue with the vehicle, not just the on-going serious problems with the GM 8L45/8L90 transmissions. This information just may become very important later on.
  7. Came from a Sierra 5.3 to a Canyon V6, in mountains I average 22.8, on highway at steady speeds I average 25.3 with a best over a 50-mile stretch at 65 mph of 31.1 mpg (manual gas pedal, no cruise control). Easily fits in garage, easy to park even in narrow Walmart spots, drives almost like a car but electric steering not a positive as our Honda Accord. Would like to have push-button start vs key, dual zone climate, shark-fin antenna vs mast antenna (gets damaged in car washes), and the narrow front seats are not made for large people. Very good carrying and towing numbers but not like the Sierra. Also, even with rebates/incentives, Canyon SLT (special order with almost everything) was $14,235.00 less than similar equip and option Sierra in my area, and I did a lot of shopping. For me, a good value for a truck that meets all my needs. But doing an around-the-block dealer test drive is not enough, so I highly recommend renting one for a few days, get to really find out the pro's and con's, then decide for yourself.
  8. The trans problems are basically not fixable, but the effects are less profound in some vehicles and very bad in others. It also seems you have a 1 in 5 chance of getting a bad one. Also, in some situations, the trans problems can be bypassed by using the "L" mode on the shifting handle ("M" on 6-speed) and controlling the transmission with the handle +/- buttons. Otherwise, I wish I had push-button start versus key, dual-zone climate control versus single zone, wider and more comfortable front seating (the current ones are absolutely not made made for larger persons), a "shark-fin" antenna instead of the mast antenna that gets damaged in car washes, a steel front bumper and a front air dam that doesn't crash on almost every parking stop. And if you get a 4x4, be VERY careful with changes !! Read the manual !! Transfer case damage can happen really fast and easily (voice of experience talking). The 4x4 knob mounted on the dash left side is awkward, I'd like it better on the center console. The 18" wheels get a lot of looks, and in my opinion the 20's look even better. If you tow, keep it below 5k. Below that the truck handles it with no problem, above that the vehicle starts working very hard and mpg numbers drop very low. I really like how easy it is to fit inside the garage, how easily it parks into smaller spaces, much better than our old Sierra, which sometimes took 2-3 parking attempts to get it to fit a spot. Drives almost like a car, goes way too fast way to easy, and my best highway mileage is recorded at 31 mpg over a 50 mile stretch (yes, I'm being honest, I can send a picture if you doubt). I also find it runs OK on 87 gas, but using when 91/93 I can really feel an overall improvement in power and response. The electric steering is a little soft, not nearly as positive as in our Honda Accord. I could say a lot more, but I HIGHLY recommend renting one for a few days, really get to know it for yourself, before you commit to purchase.
  9. towing mirrors

    The ones from Boost are pricey but very stable, and are a more "permanent" mounting. You can also get universal mount Reese model 72787 for about $20.00 each, and they work surprisingly very well. Those are about the high/low of the cost range, and there are others with prices in-between. Also, in our business we found you only need towing mirrors on a Colorado/Canyon with trailers wider that about 7 feet wide. Otherwise, stock mirrors easily view both sides of the trailer and following traffic. But then again, requirements and laws in your area may differ.
  10. Colorado Tailgate dampening

    Take it back to the dealer. Either the torsion bar wasn't installed, or it was removed, or the bar wasn't connect to the interior flange of the tailgate. All Colorado and Canyon models have a dampened tailgate, even the cheapest work models.
  11. 2017 Canyon 8 Speed Absolutely Horrible

    It is well known, and even acknowledged by GM, that the problems with this transmission cannot be fixed. Therefore, as soon as possible and with as few miles on the vehicle as possible, take it back to a dealer and request the defect be repaired. Do this several times, keeping all records of when, where, action taken (even if none), any advice or comments made by dealer persons, and if possible, record everything on video with sound. Remember it's not the dealers fault you bought a vehicle with a problem that cannot be fixed by any means, but the dealer is the one that's stuck with trying to fix it. Obtain all the information you can find on this problem, and even similar problems in other models (because the same transmission is used in multiple other vehicles), obtain all applicable GM TCB's (such as TCB 18-NA-177 and TCB 18-NA-355) that have any bearing on the problem, and then after a "reasonable number" of repair attempts apply for Arbitration according to the requirements applicable in your state. In Arbitration, which is free to the vehicle purchaser, present all evidence regarding nature of the problem, past history and the manufacturers inability to correct these serious defects, evidence that the issue exists in the vehicle you purchased, and the history of repeated attempts by dealer(s) to fix the problem but that the problem still exists. When is all is said and done, you may be given a refund of the vehicle purchase price, a replacement vehicle having the same configuration and options, a decision to return to a dealer for further repair attempts, or no other action or remedy. In the case of the 8L45 / 8L90 transmission issues, arbitration in many states has already ordered refunds and replacement vehicles, as the problems with this model transmission have been around for so long and are so well documented. In any event, Good Luck.
  12. 2018 Colorado transmission issues

    It is well known, and even acknowledged by GM, that the problems with this transmission cannot be fixed. Therefore, as soon as possible and with as few miles on the vehicle as possible, take it back to a dealer and request the defect be repaired. Do this several times, keeping all records of when, where, action taken (even if none), any advice or comments made by dealer persons, and if possible, record everything on video with sound. Remember it's not the dealers fault you bought a vehicle with a problem that cannot be fixed by any means, but the dealer is the one that's stuck with trying to fix it. Obtain all the information you can find on this problem, and even similar problems in other models (because the same transmission is used in multiple other vehicles), obtain all applicable GM TCB's (such as TCB 18-NA-177 and TCB 18-NA-355) that have any bearing on the problem, and then after a "reasonable number" of repair attempts apply for Arbitration according to the requirements applicable in your state. In Arbitration, which is free to the vehicle purchaser, present all evidence regarding nature of the problem, past history and the manufacturers inability to correct these serious defects, evidence that the issue exists in the vehicle you purchased, and the history of repeated attempts by dealer(s) to fix the problem but that the problem still exists. When is all is said and done, you may be given a refund of the vehicle purchase price, a replacement vehicle having the same configuration and options, a decision to return to a dealer for further repair attempts, or no other action or remedy. In the case of the 8L45 / 8L90 transmission issues, arbitration in many states has already ordered refunds and replacement vehicles, as the problems with this model transmission have been around for so long and are so well documented. In any event, Good Luck.
  13. need info

    Yes, you probably have the lighter-duty Z82 suspension, but I also recommend using the VIN to get your specific RPO listing. I believe the Nav question has already been completely answered, but for the towing 7K, you'll probably need a weight distributing hitch. Otherwise, some states would limit towing to 4K. Also, if you don't have a trailer brake controller, be advised all 2015's came pre-wired for a controller. The wiring is just to the left of the driver seat, under the entry trim and just forward of the brake pedal. Simply lift away the trim and pull back some carpet, and 90% of the controller work will be already done for you. You can get an OEM controller for dash-mounting, or almost any aftermarket controller and simply connect to the pre-installed wiring. It can be done in as little as 20 minutes.
  14. It is well known, and even acknowledged by GM, that the problems with this transmission cannot be fixed. Therefore, as soon as possible and with as few miles on the vehicle as possible, take it back to a dealer and request the defect be repaired. Do this several times, keeping all records of when, where, action taken (even if none), any advice or comments made by dealer persons, and if possible, record everything on video with sound. Remember it's not the dealers fault you bought a vehicle with a problem that cannot be fixed by any means, but the dealer is the one that's stuck with trying to fix it. Obtain all the information you can find on this problem, and even similar problems in other models (because the same transmission is used in multiple other vehicles), obtain all applicable GM TCB's (such as TCB 18-NA-177 and TCB 18-NA-355) that have any bearing on the problem, and then after a "reasonable number" of repair attempts apply for Arbitration according to the requirements applicable in your state. In Arbitration, which is free to the vehicle purchaser, present all evidence regarding nature of the problem, past history and the manufacturers inability to correct these serious defects, evidence that the issue exists in the vehicle you purchased, and the history of repeated attempts by dealer(s) to fix the problem but that the problem still exists. When is all is said and done, you may be given a refund of the vehicle purchase price, a replacement vehicle having the same configuration and options, a decision to return to a dealer for further repair attempts, or no other action or remedy. In the case of the 8L45 / 8L90 transmission issues, arbitration in many states has already ordered refunds and replacement vehicles, as the problems with this model transmission have been around for so long and are so well documented. In any event, Good Luck.
  15. It is well known, and even acknowledged by GM, that the problems with this transmission cannot be fixed. Therefore, as soon as possible and with as few miles on the vehicle as possible, take it back to a dealer and request the defect be repaired. Do this several times, keeping all records of when, where, action taken (even if none), any advice or comments made by dealer persons, and if possible, record everything on video with sound. Remember it's not the dealers fault you bought a vehicle with a problem that cannot be fixed by any means, but the dealer is the one that's stuck with trying to fix it. Obtain all the information you can find on this problem, and even similar problems in other models (because the same transmission is used in multiple other vehicles), obtain all applicable GM TCB's (such as TCB 18-NA-177 and TCB 18-NA-355) that have any bearing on the problem, and then after a "reasonable number" of repair attempts apply for Arbitration according to the requirements applicable in your state. In Arbitration, which is free to the vehicle purchaser, present all evidence regarding nature of the problem, past history and the manufacturers inability to correct these serious defects, evidence that the issue exists in the vehicle you purchased, and the history of repeated attempts by dealer(s) to fix the problem in your vehicle but that the problem still exists. When is all is said and done, you may be given a refund of the vehicle purchase price, a replacement vehicle having the same configuration and options, a decision to return to a dealer for further repair attempts, or no other action or remedy. In the case of the 8L45 / 8L90 transmission issues, arbitration in many states has already ordered refunds and replacement vehicles, as the problems with this model transmission have been around for so long and are so well documented. In any event, Good Luck.
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