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garagerog

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garagerog last won the day on December 29 2017

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  1. Maybe a bottom of the garage door seal or door sweep (it would take 2 of those).
  2. Congrats on getting that extra 10 to 12 ounces of dirty oil out. Not only will you do a better job than the dealer, but you'll know that the job was done right. Being a bit OCD I've most always done my own oil changes, even let the oil drain out overnight when possible to get that last bit of dirty oil out. The bottom of the oil pan is where the sludge collects, just check your oil drain pan after it sets for a bit. Due to age and the creeping miseries (osteoarthritis) it won't be long and I'll be at the mercy of the dealer.
  3. Crazy, I don't have a dog in this fight so. . . Wait until the baby Max owners opine, that actually may be what you might want to consider, especially with the farm use you mentioned. If you expect to get your mother in your new truck, you're going to definitely half to stick with a 1500, especially if you will be getting a 4wd.
  4. Biden plans on asking congress for beaucoup bucks for infrastructure spending, a good part of that to go for building a network of charging stations. Probably putting the cart before the horse because the countries electric transmission grid is iffy as it is. California is already in dire straits meeting electrical demand and they already rely on a lot of surplus electricity imported from the hydroelectric dams in the PNW. One good drought winter in the Columbia River basin and the brownouts they've experienced of late will seem like the good old days. And yet by the 2030's the only new car you'll be able to buy there has to be electric? Course maybe by that time most every one will have moved out anyway.
  5. Creed, although I live in SC now, I was born in Wenatchee and spent a lot of time there after my parents retired from the farm to live there, so I'm well familiar with the area. Whatever gear change you go with, you're going to really enjoy the difference, even driving empty. Unless you're just driving north to Chelan, you have significant grades in all the other directions, Stevens Pass to the west, Pine Canyon to the east and that short grade on Trinidad hill to the south. I try and keep up with the local news there by perusing the KPQ and Wenatchee World websites. BTW, welcome to the forum!
  6. ArcticFox, given the info you have provided about a hard working work truck that even had a dump at one time, I would suspect the drivers side rear spring pack might be your issue. You would probably have to replace both sides with new springs to achieve a level bed. If you have a frame shop in your area, you might take it in and run the possibilities by them.
  7. To me those human looking robots are creepy and a bit scary, maybe I watched to many Terminator movies. My wife often comments that she will only use self-checkout when the big box store sends her a W-2 for doing their job. I only use self-checkout when I only have an item or two and the regular checkout has a long line. I have yet to see a store giving a discount for using self-checkout, so I'd rather try and help keep someone employed, especially during these trying times.
  8. Shouldn't be a problem, a little anti-seize dope on the threads should make removal the next time much easier.
  9. Aaron, not for sure on yours, but on at least the older GM differentials the fill plug was NPT, 3/4" was a common size. You could try and match it up at any hardware store, the recessed plug style may be hard to find, most NPT plugs have a square head.
  10. Hold onto that Goat and baby it, it might end up helping fund your retirement someday. One of GM's worst head up their ass moments is when they got rid of the Pontiac lineup.
  11. Hands down best and favorite of mine is the 71 Chevelle SS that I still own. Ordered it new when I was still in college, insurance was a bit of an issue at that time so I had the choice of getting a BB and automatic, or a SB and 4-speed. I really wanted a 4-speed so I went with the L48 350 and the 4-speed, it has a 3.31 12 bolt, the 3.31 is a bit of a comprise gear ratio but it worked ok for me. Only thing different I would have done is gone with a bench seat instead of buckets and a console, found out that crawling in the backseat on moonlit nights was a bit of a pain, but still worth it. ? 211,000 miles on it, never had the heads or pan off. It's sat for awhile now, I have a new master cylinder for it and it needs a new radiator, just haven't gotten around to it yet.
  12. Beamie, the only thing I haven't seen mentioned so far was if you're sure you got all of the air "burped" out of the coolant system after your coolant change. If you have an air pocket you will get errant dashboard temperature readings.
  13. OP, you might want to mention that 3 of those tires are Bridgestones and the orphan child is a Goodyear. Also post pictures of the tread patterns so a prospective buyer can evaluate whether the different tread patterns are compatible enough and suit their needs.
  14. Thought this might be a fun topic to get some feedback on. For me I really enjoy "Roadkill", yes it's a "reality tv show" and I'm sure they have a lot of staging and support but to me it more accurately depicts what your average Joe or shade tree mechanic might run into with their roadside repairs. "Garage Squad" is another one that's a little more realistic for your average Joe. I really enjoy all of the shows, but some of them just leave me a little depressed because I don't have a 2500 square feet shop with pristine floors and every machine tool at your disposal, e.g. they have machine presses to press out a bearing when the rest of us resort to a socket and a 6 lb. hand sledge and hope for the best. And when they're installing accessories or doing a brake or suspension upgrade for instance, it almost always seems they're working on a brand new rig without a spec of dust or grime on the underneath of the vehicle. Your thoughts?
  15. Speaking of cold weather, let's not forget to be thankful for synthetic gear oil in this day and age. Back in the day when I lived in eastern Wa. state that sees it's fair share of winter weather, I had an 84 K20 HD camper special with the HD compound low manual transmission. This p/u had a block heater and on cold days I would leave it plugged in overnight even though it was in an insulated garage because I'm a wuss and like instant heat from the get go. After sitting out in the cold all day at work, no problem with the engine turning over because of using the correct winter weight oil. The gear oil in the MT, transfer case, and differential was another story however, it felt like I was dragging a battleship anchor behind me for the first few miles until it warmed up some, the manual transmission was especially difficult in pulling off crisp shifts.
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