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garagerog

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garagerog last won the day on December 29 2017

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About garagerog

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  • Name
    Roger
  • Location
    SC
  • Drives
    2005 K1500

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  1. One thing that would keep me from ever buying a current Ram 1500 is the shift knob, I mean how sissy can you get? Even the old push-button 727 torqueflite had to be better than that. If you really want a Ram, pull out your man card and opt for a 2500 where you can actually get a shift lever.
  2. winter driving

    Lastly, I work in the scrap biz so little easier/more accessible for me to do this, but when I was driving my 2WD Ranger beater in winter (had snows) instead of sand bags I used a 3/4" thick 3x3' plate of steel w/ a padeye welded on it to help drag it out @ end of the season. A hole would suffice too. Takes up way negligible space in the bed, doesn't break open & spill sand everywhere, doesn't shift around etc. Edited 14 minutes ago by crushNchowda Did something similar many years ago and being in the scrap business you might appreciate this. I grew up on a farm in Eastern Wa. state that can get a fair amount of snow some winters. Anyway I ended up living in the city and had a 2wd 81 C10 Silverado with an open differential that was absolutely awful in the snow. My Dad still being on the farm had a lot of junk laying around so we used a Case wheel tractor with a farmhand and a chain to load a rolled up length of sprocket roller chain off an old iH crawler into the bed between the wheel wells, had plywood under it. Probably was in the neighborhood of 400-500 lbs, but at any rate it was enough to make a world of difference in rear wheel traction.
  3. 285/40/24

    40 sidewalls on a P/U truck? Hope you're young with good dental insurance and even then you might want to invest in a kidney belt.
  4. With a WDH and trailer brakes I think you should be fine with your RCSB towing a 2 horse trailer, ONLY because a 2 horse trailer is relatively short. If you were talking a 28-30 foot TT that's a whole other story, you probably would be getting into the realm of the tag wagging the dog scenario.
  5. OP, the problem with concrete highways are they are segmented with expansion joints, once your unloaded trailer hits that first expansion joint it's going to bounce and start the oscillation bouncing you describe between the 30-90 mph you mentioned. It's my belief that any suspension changes you make to your truck would have minimum benefit, the problem is with the unloaded trailer. If there is not a significant amount of weight you can shift from the tow vehicle to the trailer, you're going to have to address the trailer suspension. Trailer shocks like you mentioned might help, there are also trailer suspension equalizers, check out e-trailer.com. But before you spend any money at all, try lowering the trailer tires psi to the lowest safest psi and see if that helps, you'll have to carry a 12V compressor to air up before loading one of those F-150's.
  6. I love a dry sense of humor!
  7. OP, I didn't see how many miles on your 2016 and I'm thinking out of the box here but I wonder about the torque converter. If nothing else works you might try a full tranny flush.
  8. Many years ago 3 teenage boys were horsing around in a Mickey D's parking lot and managed to scratch the door on my prized Chevelle SS. A good Samaritan witnessed this and reported the driver's license number to the police whom in turn contacted me and basically asked me how I wanted to proceed. I told the police if they wanted to give me the boy's phone number I would contact them and see if they were agreeable to working the damage off which they were. So I had 3 teenage boys doing yard work for me on a Saturday when I'm sure they would be somewhere else. They were really good kids, just being teenagers I guess. All in all it worked out well and those boys learned a valuable lesson. Unfortunately times have changed and I don't think that scenario would play out any more.
  9. OP didn't say how many miles he had put on his 18 Silverado in the first month of ownership, but always a good idea to do the first oil change early, anywhere between 1 and 3k to get rid of break in metal, assembly lube, etc. The oil filter is especially critical to get changed early.
  10. I'm Out!

    Ok, I realize this may seem like nit-picking from an old fart, but Toyota and Nissan do not build trucks, p/u trucks yes. GM, Ford, and Ram build 1 ton DRW trucks and in most farm states that's the minimum to be considered a truck. 10,000 gross and dual rear wheels, anything else is a p/u truck. Check your state's DMV for their definition. My K1500 is a pick-up truck and that's what I refer to it if asked.
  11. A lot of GM sedans for nearly 20 years have located the battery in the passenger compartment, usually underneath the rear passenger seat . By doing so they isolate the battery from engine heat. From what I've seen on this and another GM p/u forum, once GM changed the battery location from the front drivers side up front near the radiator where it's getting cooler air to the passenger side near the firewall where it's getting blasted with exhaust manifold heat, battery life has suffered mightily.
  12. Saw an ad on the tube awhile ago for a LOW mileage lease on a new Escalade for ONLY $899/mo! Fine print at the bottom of the ad went by so fast I didn't catch how much down for such a deal but of course the usual tax and license was extra. Just a tad rich for my blood.
  13. Must have options

    I'm an old fart so as long as I have simple A/C (not dual-zone and the added complexity), power windows and mirrors and a V-8 I'm happy. I'd be even happier if they would bring back wing windows. Less is more as far as I'm concerned.
  14. rebuild or replace

    Whether you rebuild or replace with a long block depends a lot on whether you have a competent machine shop handy. In addition to the things you mentioned if you have one or more bearings going bad you may have to have the crankshaft turned also. You might want to wait to base your decision until you have the motor torn down to see what needs done, that way you will have a laundry list to take to a machine shop to get an estimate and get a feel for their competency. If you're worried about the core charge on your motor and don't want to completely tear it down, at the very least flip it on an engine stand, pull the oil pan and inspect the bearings.
  15. Transmission Fluid Change

    Jordan, good job on cleaning that pan and magnet, I'm sure you would agree after all the fine crud you cleaned out of both that a pan drop and filter change is worth it opposed to a flush only without dropping the pan. Replacement filter is somewhat different, must be an updated design which isn't all that uncommon.
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