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AzCoronaDog

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About AzCoronaDog

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  • Birthday January 3

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  1. Off topic, and none of my business, but I'm curious - if you don't mind my asking, how did you manage to average 40k miles per year on your 2016? Seems like you just about lived in that one! LOL
  2. Thanks CS! Good info and great savings over what the stealership wanted.
  3. Thanks TX! Details like this are why I read these forums. Here in AZ, we are lucky to get more than 2 years out of a battery, and I just bought a 2017 that still has the factory one, so this tip may save me aggravation down the road, if I remember I read it... LOL
  4. I have ACC on both my Yukon XL and my Jeep Grand Cherokee, and I really like it on both. For those so adamantly against it because it brakes too soon when you are looking to pass, you can override that by simply pressing the accelerator yourself. It will not resume it's normal operation until you let off, so it can work much like regular cruise control with a tiny bit of driver input.
  5. I commented on the park override because the OP mentioned '...while driving'. Not sure it is a good idea to fold the seat while in motion, but might make disciplining some unruly kids back there more fun!
  6. I put dual batteries in my 1990 Suburban, and I am working on upgrading to a 2016+ Yukon XL and already noticed the 2nd batter tray is already there. For the 1990, I had to buy the 2nd tray that the diesel versions used. I discovered that the 1990 wiring was essentially split into two circuits at the fuse block, with the engine stuff on one and all the accessory items, headlights, interior lights, radio, etc. on the other. The two main feeds were joined at the alternator so it was easy to separate. I believe this was due to using the same basic wiring as the trucks of that year, some of which offered a camper wiring option. I am really hoping there may be a similar split for the newer models. At first I used a battery isolator for charging, but switched to a constant duty rated solenoid, as it was more reliable, much higher amperage ability and 0 voltage drop. It was wired to the fuse box at a point that was hot only in run, not accessory or start. I put a momentary switch in the dash that would engage the solenoid from the 2nd battery, so if for some reason the primary battery was weak, I could jump start myself without using cables. I also mounted 2 battery tenders under the hood and put a marine grade 110v covered connector in the fender so I can plug it in and keep everything charged when I don't use the truck for long periods. I use an AGM primary battery and a lead acid deep cycle secondary. I tried an AGM deep cycle, but it had a lot lower capacity and did not last anywhere close to the lead acid ones. I do have to check the water level fairly often in the summers here, but the trade off was worth it to me.
  7. I see no reason why you couldn't run a cable with the right number of wires from the switches in the back to a similar set of switches in the front. Lots of covers and carpeting and whatever to work under, but easy enough. The bigger issue will be to override the stock system requirement of being in park. Probing the wires on the module identified in the previous comment with a voltmeter in and out of park might figure it out.
  8. Nice! I am liking this upgrade. I am moving from my old 1990 Suburban to a 2016 or so Yukon XL Denali soon, and I was thinking I would miss the 2nd row bench sometimes. This is a great way to have it all. Looking forward to any updates on the install. I thank you in advance for saving me the trouble of debugging the details.
  9. I would work out the charging issue first, as everything else you describe is dependent on electronics that could be sensitive to power issues. Check the connections at the battery and alternator and have both checked with the appropriate testers. Most auto parts stores in my area will do that for free.
  10. My first post here, I tried search but found no results, so here is my question: Is anyone running 17" wheels on a lifted 2015+ GM SUV? Wondering about any brake clearance issues, etc. I see that the spare is on a 17" rim, so with the stock steering knuckle and brakes they obviously work. But what about with the replacement knuckle of a 6" lift? I currently have a 1990 V2500 Suburban 4x4 that I have owned for the last 22 years, and I am finally ready to go newer. I am looking at getting a 2016+ Yukon XL Denali. I plan to add a 6" lift and 35" tires. My experience with tire and wheels is that in general, the more sidewall, the better the ride and the more flexibility in airing down for four wheeling. Plus I'm an old guy and not a huge fan of the look of giant wheels with what amounts to a big rubber band of a tire on a 4x4. And after reading all the complaints about noise / buffeting / thumping / vibrations on this newer K2xx platform, I want to minimize that too. So I am thinking of 17" rims with 35/12.50/17 or 315/70/17 tires, and would like to confirm somebody has run one of these combinations on a 6" lift. Thanks in advance!
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