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Found 20 results

  1. Faulty headlights are one of the things to blame for accidents on the road. Thus, for you to stay away from road accidents or get pulled over by traffic enforcers, you should see to it that your car’s headlight bulbs are in good working order. It’s advisable that you do regular maintenance or changing of your headlight bulbs. There are indications to look out for when your headlight bulbs are not in excellent working condition. The Importance of Headlight Ford Headlight Bulbs Headlights are an essential part of any vehicle because they ensure safety when you’re driving on the road. They make sure that you see the road clearly and for other motorists, as well as pedestrians, to see you. Your car headlight bulbs also provide you with good visibility to see if there are any hazards such as a slippery road or road blockage. It might sound understandable, but some people still fail to take into account the importance of headlights. Common Headlight Problems One of the most common issues of car headlights is a broken switch. In this case, you’ll have difficulty switching between headlight modes. The lights may come on and off or may have problems on how a particular mode do its function. Another obvious sign of faulty headlight bulbs is if they only provide dim illumination or they don’t turn on at all. Problems in your car headlights are safety hazards that you need to take seriously and find solutions. Halogen vs. HID vs. LED Headlight Bulbs There are different types of headlight bulbs that you can find in the market today. It’s crucial that you know about them so that you’ll have the best buy. Read on below for a comparison between the common types of headlight bulbs: LED, Halogen, and HID. Halogen Headlights HID Headlights LED Headlights Advantages Affordable Dimmable Easy to Replace Universal Farther Reach Use Less Power Brighter Light Longer Lifespan Energy-Efficient Small Size Brighter Doesn’t Have Strong Glare like HID Disadvantages Energy Intensive Prone to Overheating Extra Sensitive Strong Glare More Expensive than Halogen More Expensive Difficult to Fit Halogen Headlight Bulbs High Beam Halogen light is an advanced form of incandescent light. It’s composed of a combination of nitrogen and argon gases that are contained within a heat-resistant package that also has tungsten filament. From the car’s battery, the electrical charge is delivered to the tungsten filament, which then heats at around 2,500 degrees Celsius to create light. This procedure is called the incandescence process. HID Headlight Bulbs For almost two decades, the halogen bulb went without a rival as the standard headlight bulbs for vehicles. However, when the HID or high-intensity discharge lamp came, the dominance of halogen bulbs was threatened. HID bulbs use xenon gas to start its illumination process. People often preferred it over halogen bulbs because of its high-intensity light and color temperature. HID lights have the same function as neon lights. The electrical charge passes through a gas-filled tube with electrodes at both endpoints. Then, the opposite electrodes stimulate the halide salts and xenon gas contained in a quartz enclosure to create illumination. LED Headlight Bulbs LED or light-emitting diode differs widely from all the headlights mentioned when it comes to its lighting process. In LED headlight bulbs, negative electrons pass through holes in a semiconductor to generate light. When electrons enter a low-energy hole, there will be a release of photons. This method is called electroluminescence process that occurs at a frequency of a thousand times per second. Difference Between Low Beam & High Beam T1 headlight bulbs In most vehicles, there are what you call low-beam and high-beam headlights. It’s a must that you know about what are the purpose and functions of both for you to use your lights properly. A low beam is also called a passing beam or dipped beam. It provides limited light so that it does not dazzle other oncoming motorists. Drivers switch on to low beam, especially if there are other vehicles on the road. A low beam headlight is directed either sideward or downward to provide road visibility with less glare at night. High beam is also called full beam and main beam. The high beam provides bright light to maximize the distance of visibility of the driver. When the high beam is on, its light is directed in front of the road. When one is in the middle of the road, the other oncoming vehicles may not see that people and accident may happen, because of the high beam you turned on. That is because the intense high beam will glare the oncoming vehicles. It’s not suitable to use high beam when there are other vehicles and people on the road. That’s why you should take care when using high beam because it can dazzle other motorist and can cause accidents. How to Adjust Your Car Headlights There are times that your car headlights are misaligned, thereby not providing the illumination that you want when you’re driving on the road. Therefore, it’s advisable that you know how to adjust it so that you will prevent accidents. Follow the Steps: Step 1: Level Your Car The first step to do when adjusting your car headlight is to remove any extra weight from your car trunk. You should also make sure that the tires are leveled on the ground. Then, you can check if the headlight aim is at the zero position. Step 2: Position Your Car Next is to position your car on a level ground ten to fifteen feet from a-dark wall. You should ensure that the front of the car is directed to the wall. You can do it in a paved driveway or a level parking lot for that purpose. Step 3: Turn the-Headlights On Mark the vertical and horizontal center lines of the headlight-beams with masking tape to create two T’s on the wall. In this stage, avoid using high beam or fog lights. Step 4: Ensure the Lights-are Level Use a carpenters level between the two marked lines to determine if they’re level. If they’re not-even, use-a steel tape to measure the distance of the lower mark if it goes much higher up the wall and lowers it to attain the same height as the other marker. Both center lines should not go beyond 3.5 feet from the ground. Step 5: Adjust the Lights Put the car on the reverse, 25 feet away from the wall. It’s a must to use a tape measure to know the distance from the wall. Then, turn off the lights. Get rid of the trim ring and find the adjusters. After that, adjust the vertical and horizontal screws, and see if the light is leveled on the marker on the wall. Adjust headlight bulbs In Conclusion The headlight is an essential part of your car. Thus, you should know how to properly use them and do regular maintenance and adjusting to prevent accidents on the road. You can take some knowledge from this article on how to make the best use of your car headlights. Also, we have different blogs about lighting and vehicle modifications, if you are interested, please read on.
  2. Just bought a 2014 sierra 4x4 and ordered the 2" kit to level it out. On rough country's website they say that this kit only allows for up to a 32" tire, and I am looking to put 33s. I am new to GM, what's the biggest tires that I can fit?
  3. Hello, Everyone! I never menction much about my job, but im the Parts, Garments and Accesories Manager on a Polaris Dealer (Pue, Mx) As some of you may have seen on my last video, i like to go off roading on my ´15 Silverado 2wd, and some of my customers at the dealer constantly want me to take them on trails i know up the popocatepetl volcano, which is active, and is a couple of hours away from the city Last time i made a video about it, hope you guys like it, and subscribe to my youtube channel, it always makes my day. I´ll also leave some pics here as well
  4. Hi All, A newbie here in So Cal. After 30 + years on the job decided to pull the plug and retire. I've had a company car for the past 20 years so I had to find me a nice retirement vehicle. My retirement truck is a 2018 Sierra Denali 4x4 with the ultimate package. After 3 months I love the truck. I only have a couple of questions and looking for some advice. 1: Is it normal for the transmission to clunk at times and shift hard? 2: Can the Denali be used off road and is it possible to change the 22" wheels and tires for 18"? If so will it void any warranties and or mess with the suspension? Once a year I travel to the Eastern Sierra's for a week of trout fishing. There are some places we go that is off road etc. The truck is soooo nice I almost don't even want to take it off road but if I do will I have to worry about what it can or cannot do? I know I should have gotten the All-Terrain but my dealer said it was to late to order as they had already started gearing up for the new 2019's. Plus I couldn't find one I liked that could be dealer swapped. Thanks a head of time for your answers/recommendations, Dj
  5. Hello all! Im looking for someone with welding / fabrication experience to build me a custom bumper for a 2015 Chevy 1500 4x4. I live in MD and would be willing to come to you if needed. My goal is a simple slim line bumper that will give me a better approach angle. I don`t need any finish work done just the rough unit welded up. If anyone has a idea please let me know! I also would have some interest in doing the back as well. I like the look of this but feel its too weak and would bend to easy going over small trees or in a fender bender. My goal is to get close to this but have the sides be stronger, have tow rings, and a front hitch as well. A bonus would be a skid plate. Here is my truck with the bumper off when I put my recessed front hitch on.
  6. I just recently found out about the tilt indicator in my truck and I would like to see some pictures of it in action! How about this I'm going to start with my picture of 1% tilt and let's see how far we can get the tilt indicators to go SAFELY please!!!! Every % counts highest for left or right and for forward or backwards. It would be great to see a picture of the DIC and the truck on the grade (if you can of course). *I take no responsibility if someone does not use common sense or if this game is a bad idea in the first place
  7. Whats up guys! I'm gonna be taking my truck on its first sand dune trip in the next couple weeks and was looking to get a flagpole. I have seen plenty of mounts that hook right up trailer hitch but they look flimsy. Just wondering what you guys are running??
  8. Sup everyone! Will be installing some new lighting in a few weeks and wanted to see what others have done. here is my line-up: I will be using Rough Country's 52" Curved LED bar across the windshield: http://www.roughcountry.com/52-inch-curved-x5-led-light-bar-76254.html also the RC flush rear bumper mounted LED reverse lights: http://www.roughcountry.com/2-inch-led-square-flush-mount-lights-70803bl.html also the RC rock lights behind the wheel-wells: http://www.roughcountry.com/led-rock-lights-709rlc.html I am still looking into replacing the OEM HID lights, i would like a whiter light. if anyone has any ideas or knows where to obtain better HID lights for the 2017 Silverado post a link, thanks!
  9. Zane Merva Executive Editor, GM-Trucks.com November, 2015 The Chevy Colorado Diesel is just starting to arrive at dealerships. I recently had a chance to take a fully loaded Colorado Z71 Trail Boss with the all new 2.8L Duramax Diesel off-roading in the dusty Nevada desert. How does the special edition Colorado perform off-road? Does the Duramax help or hurt the midsizer? Should you upgrade your Colorado with GM's available performance parts? Let’s go and find out! Thankfully, being the first few days of November, I didn’t have to worry about the scorching heat of the Nevada desert. I was, however, warned not to wander off the road too far off the road and be on the lookout for rattlesnake. While I never did see any menacing wildlife, the prospect we might made our time with the Trail Boss all the more exciting. I’ve long been a fan of diesel engines for small pickups and SUVs. The low end torque focused nature of the diesel matches nicely with the low-speed driving most owners of these types of vehicles do most. Or at least, at least the type of driving they want to do most. So, to see the Colorado’s off-road model paired with the brand’s new small Duramax Diesel engine is satisfying. When we gave you our first on-road impressions of the 2.8L Duramax Diesel for the mid-size trucks it was on paved roads and smoother all-season tires. The Trail Boss takes the Colorado to an off-road slant, with large knobby tires, slick LED lights, a blacked out bowtie, and a tubular steel sail at the front of the bed. That’s just naming a few of the features. Traveling down what some might call a "road" in the middle of the Nevada desert, the Trail Boss Diesel I’m piloting reminds me a whole lot of the S-10 ZR2 I used to own nearly a decade ago. A fat low end torque curve and capable off-road parts leave me feeling confident as we traversed through narrow canyons and washed out dry river beds. Without a doubt, the 2.8L Duramax shines in this type of work. The key to off-road driving is slow deliberate movements. With 369 lb-ft of torque on tap at low RPM, piloting off-road at a measured crawl is a pleasure. The Trail Boss’s Wrangler Duratrac tires grip loose dirt and rock substantially better than the standard all-season radial tires that come on a Z71 model. The tubular side steps provide substantial rocker panel protection. Better yet, even if you already own a Colorado, you don’t have to buy a brand new Trail Boss to experience these upgrades. Just pick up a 2016 GM Performance Parts Catalog and turn to page 66. With a little time and money, you can turn your own truck into a Trail Boss, right in your own garage. The company offers off-road Wrangler Duratrac tires, black aluminum wheels, floor liners, color matched grilles, and even a transfer case shield. For performance oriented owners, a performance exhaust and air intake are also available. Best of all, every single one of these parts is covered within your vehicle's factory warranty. To add some depth and compare, I also drove a Performance Parts loaded Silverado High Country. While the Silverado exhibited a more plush ride, it’s wider girth made it substantially more difficult to maneuver on the tighter sections of the trail. Capable in its own right, the Silverado didn’t give me the same confidence that the narrower Colorado did. This is one circumstance where the just-a-little-bit-smaller outside proportions of the mid-size make all the difference. If you're looking for a utilitarian vehicle that can take you far off the beaten path, the Colorado Trail Boss should be right up your alley. Chevrolet has a unique offering with it's 2.8L Duramax that you can't find anywhere else. That sets the Colorado to become a popular off-road platform, ripe for modification. You can head down to your Chevrolet dealer and purchase your own Trail Boss straight from the factory, or if you already own a Colorado outfit it with the same parts from GM’s Performance Catalog. You can read the all new edition right here.
  10. So I've got a 50" LED light bar to go across the roof of my truck, and I've ordered the socal supertucks mounting brackets for it. Bought a new overhead console with beacon light switch and relay to run it, and installed the switch last night. Now I'm waiting on the mounts and I'll take it to a local body shop and have them mount it up (I just dont want to make a wrong measurement when drilling is required). I'm also having the body shop paint match the light bar and mounts to my truck and was wondering if anyone else has done this or seen it done. Seems like it would look really good to me but I haven't found it done anywhere else yet.
  11. Has anyone put their rig to the test with some off roading or driving in heavy icy/snow conditions? If so, have any pictures or videos? The Sierra 4x4 and traction systems are marketed to be impressive, would be great to hear if the systems perform as well as GM said it would like in their promo videos? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=i_de4LQQ_KM Where I live in California, the most we get is some heavy rains and light mud, but I plan to take some trips to the mountains for some skiing and will maybe see how well it does. Came across these GMC promo videos from Latin America showing the Sierra All Terrain doing some cool stuff. Obviously staged to some degree. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5cWu5ZqzK8I https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=y3tl5dNM1JQ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PPeMjbTR-Hk Will driving with 4WD auto in the rain cause problems to the system? http://www.gmc.com/content/dam/GMC/global/master/nscwebsite/en/home/Owners/Manuals/01_Images/2014-sierra-1500-owners-manual.pdf Avoid driving in four-wheel drive on clean, dry pavement. It may cause your tires to wear faster, make the transfer case harder to shift, and run noisier. Also, I saw this sentence regarding 4WD high in the Sierra owners manual. While in Four-Wheel Drive High, the vehicle can be driven at any posted legal speed limit.
  12. Hey Y'all! I've got an '89 K2500 scottsdale (bright red with a new paint job) that has been in my family since it rolled off the lot in '89, and its totally stock. and now that it's been handed down to me and I've got a steady job, I wanna make her more respectable as a bigass truck. I'm pretty much leaving everything open and up to discussion, but some must-haves are: -OR capability. My friends have a little OR club and there's some great trails not too far from here. -Loud. More or less, lets all talk about what might make this truck really great. I can upload pics later, but my phone is acting up and won't send me the pics to my computer.
  13. We all see many trucks here in the forum with lift kits, some moderate, some extreme. This poll is solely to gauge members as to their intended purpose of installing suspension lifts on their trucks.
  14. rusty01

    XJ Beast!

    From the album: Summer fun!

    My other summer toy (and fall, winter spring as well!). 1994 XJ with 8" lift, 35" Baja's and locked in the rear. Thing is BEAST!
  15. I have a 2003 1500hd 2wd that has a fabtech 6" lift kit on it, i want to return to stock height. just want to know if anyone in the socal area would like to swap my lifted parts for your stock parts
  16. Just bought a 2014 sierra 4x4 and ordered the 2" kit to level it out. On rough country's website they say that this kit only allows for up to a 32" tire, and I am looking to put 33s. I am new to GM, what's the biggest tires that I can fit?
  17. seatec

    GMCMud

    © SeaTec

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