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Cowpie

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Cowpie last won the day on June 2 2017

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About Cowpie

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    Senior Enthusiast

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  • Name
    Cliff
  • Location
    Iowa
  • Gender
    Male
  • Drives
    2015 Silverado 2500HD LT Z71 6.0L and 2006 Cadillac CTS 3.6L

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  1. I took the other end approach. Lowered the back end with a couple of McGaughy's drop shackles. Guaranteed to prevent wear and tear on front end. And makes the bed easier to access.
  2. Yeah that "real truck driver" stuff is thrown around by folks who have never really done much with trucking. One thing I have learned is to work smarter, not harder. I would like to see those that use that term "real truck driver" handle a 4x4 double transmission on a hill with 45,000 lb in the box and no power steering. I am quite tired enough of even dealing with the nice and easy 18 speed in mine. I would much rather have Allison do the work for me. Nothing left to prove. Plenty of worn out T shirts of all my adventures. Now time to just take advantage of some of the newer technology if I buy another tractor.
  3. Yeah, 0w20 is really extreme. I have gotten away fro the 40 weights and into the 30 weight oils for my various diesel needs, but a 20 weight is not going in any diesel I own.
  4. Yeah, I suppose. That averaging 135,000 miles a year of driving really isn’t all that much and leaves me a lot of time to type. My semi truck doesn’t get driven much either. It is a 2013 that I bought in August 2012 and it just turned over 914,000 miles the other day. Over 5 million documented miles driving commercially, 49 states and most of the Canadian provinces. 10 years commercial driving in Alaska.
  5. I would because of the simplicity and ease of being able to work on and availability of low priced parts and components. I can replace the turbo on my 12.7 for $700. I can only look at one those newer water cooled VG turbos on the newer engines for $3000 or more on the parts counter not installed. So it is not likely that I will go new. There is not a heavy truck engine being made now that interests me. They are a morass of sensors and complexity on steroids that doesn't deliver the value. I will more than likely just drop in another Detroit Factory Reman 12.7 crate engine in the truck and keep it going. Some things I do like about the newer heavy trucks has nothing to do with engines and creature comforts. . Stuff like air disc brakes that I don't have. And on topic... the Allison TC10 that is available in some class 8 OTR tractors.
  6. Yeah, GM and Allison were sister companies years ago. The relationship continues even though GM sold off Allison. Really, about time they came out with a updated 10 speed version for the pickups. Allison has had a 10 speed auto out for heavy commercial semi OTR trucks for a while. Even considering a Allison TC10 in my next semi truck purchase if I buy another one. That is still up in the air. What really amazes me is that no other OEM's choose Allison for their heavy pickup transmissions. Allison makes transmissions for all brands of commercial trucks from class 4 on up thru class 8. It really is a surprise that Ford and FCA haven't offered Allison's in their 3/4 and 1 ton pickups. Allison has more experience making auto trans for just about everything. When folks question Allison stuff, l like to show them this video.....
  7. LOL. Yeah, that is funny. It is all about eye candy I guess.
  8. I suppose it is cool to look like a 2500, but if we put 2500 lb of material in the back end would it still look like a 2500 to everyone that a true 2500 would look like with 2500 lb of material in the back? And I just filled up my 2015 2500 with E85 for $1.11 a gallon. I typically average (all miles) about 10 mpg on E85. That makes my cost per mile about 11 cents. Gas is going for $1.94 in my area. That would mean, just to break even on cost per mile, a similar pickup would have to average 17-18 mpg. Oh... what you are getting with the 1/2 ton. So our fuel costs per mile are identical! Oh... and that $1.11 a gallon for E85 was not with any of that fuel card or fuel reward discount stuff. That it full pump price. Didn't want someone to think I was not playing on a level field.
  9. One does have to wonder... what is it about OEM's that they feel they constantly have to be redesigning the looks of something? If they spent as much time in actually refining the guts of their vehicles as they do the looks and ooh aah crap, we actually might make progress on having first class vehicles.
  10. 2in Rear Drop Shackles

    Actually, inflating tires to no more than 55 all the way around when empty does more for ride quality than anything else. Other than that, ride remained the same with back lowered.. With the 2" drop shackles installed, the SumoSprings are in contact with the drive axle all the time. They are progressive in resistance, made out of polymer foam type of material that is very similar in function as an air bag setup. As more load is placed on the back, the more resistance the Sumo's offer. About the time the pickup is getting close to level under a heavy load (over 2000#), the Sumo's are providing full 1500# additional support. They really help on cornering under a load. Under a load, the Sumo's make the ride feel as smooth as air bags. And by resting on the axle all the time, there is no jarring contact going on like with Timbrens and such. There was no need to realign. Nothing was done to the front. I didn't install the shackles. I had a shop near me do it when I had them replace the stupid OEM trash can muffler with a Magnflow while they had it up on the lift. I did to the Sumo's myself. That was a simple 15 minute job. Just pry out the factory bump stops with a screwdriver and pop the Sumo's in their place. I did raise the back and remove tires to make that job go quickly. I would take pictures but my pickup is a mess and you wouldn't be able to tell much. One of the disadvantages of living on rural gravel roads when it rains or melting snow. Everything turns into a mud bog.
  11. Adding a Catch Can

    Actually, it is more than that. Since the advent of EGR on diesels in 2003 and then the EPA requiring CCV return setups in 2007, the OEM's figured out really quick that having oil laden crankcase gasses returning to the intake and then mixing with soot laden exhaust gases from the EGR created a real mess in the intake. So, that is the primary reason that the emissions equipped diesels have air/oil separators on them. They are pretty elaborate on the heavy diesels. This is just the separator unit from the Cummins ISX engine with 7 separator filters on it.....
  12. 2in Rear Drop Shackles

    I did the 2" drop shackles on my 2015 2500 shortly after I bought it. I also put on a set of 1500# rated SumoSprings in place of the OEM bump stops. I can throw over a ton of material in the back end and it just reaches being level front to rear. 4 years and it is one of the best things I did to the pickup. That "cat in heat" look of the stock 3/4 ton was goofy and made getting in and out of the bed more difficult.
  13. Regarding the "turbocharger deposits", that sounds like marketing nonsense targeted at those who have limited understanding of modern engine setups to get them to buy a product. Many modern turbochargers are water cooled nowadays. Certainly, all the pickup diesels now have water cooled turbochargers. Even a modern conventional oil does not coke up in turbocharger bearings as in decades gone by. Hundreds of thousands of commercial trucks go hundreds of thousands of miles each using conventional and basic syn blend motor oils with no turbocharger deposit issues. All I have used is a syn blend in mine and it has 910,000 miles on the motor and still has original turbo. And it is the traditional non water cooled variety. A Borg Warner 171702. At what point would turbocharger deposits be an issue for me? At 2 million miles?
  14. The problem when you have two different metals that expand at differing rates. Aluminum heads and steel manifolds. One can sidestep the need to replace manifold bolts, saving a lot of money, if they break by using kits like this one..... http://kralautoparts.com/parts there are numerous videos that show how to do this.
  15. A large Chevy dealer near me also runs a high performance shop. I checked and they would do a supercharger on the 6.0. They said it is a pretty easy setup to get up and running. If I was going that route, I would probably have them do it. For me, there are some things that are just best to let experts do.
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