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MaverickZ71

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MaverickZ71 last won the day on November 7 2019

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About MaverickZ71

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  1. As stated in Motor Trend's 2021 Ultimate Vehicle Rankings (current issue), Chevrolet was in second place in full-sized pickup sales behind Ford since 1978. Now they have slid to 3rd place, behind Ram. Reason: ugly exterior designs and old interior designs with cheap materials and switchgear. For the 2021 full-sized pickups, here are their rankings: 1) Ram, 2) Ford, 3) GMC, 4) Chevy, 5) Toyota, 6) Nissan.
  2. There is also an AAM plant in Silao, Mexico where the Silverado/Sierra 1500 crew cab factory is.
  3. I had to replace the brake light switch on our '09 Silverado because the cruise control quit working. Crazy thing is, the brake lights still worked and it shifted in and out of park perfectly. I've also seen the Stabilitrak/ABS lights and chime accompany bad throttle body codes, AFM misfire codes, low brake fluid codes, etc. The problem is, it seems like the cheaper code readers will read most of the powertrain error codes, but when you get into some deeper electrical issues or body control module codes, etc, you have to have an expensive GM scantool to read those.
  4. CONGRATS! Our '09 Silverado is getting close, but not quite there yet, due to the COVID slowdown.
  5. Too many possibilities. Almost any trouble code can throw a Stabilitrak/ABS warning, even it the problem has nothing directly to do with Stabilitrak/ABS. You need to get the codes read. It could very well be the shifter safety interlock. Some auto parts places will scan codes for you for free (because they want to sell you the subsequent parts). Or if you subscribe to OnStar, press the blue button and tell them you want a remote diagnostic run and for them to tell you the code number(s). Then you can look the code number up on the internet to see what the common fix is. Last resort is to bite the bullet and pay the GM dealer $100+ per hour for an initial diagnosis.
  6. Looks good, and I'll bet it sounds good, too. I like that Dark Sky color. Are you going to paint the towhooks black and black out the 6.2L and "4" on the AT4 badges as well, while you're in the #BBM mood? PS Don't forget to update your "Drives" line in your profile.
  7. Well, you know how it works. . . these days Goodyear seems to be more worried about supporting the BLM rioters and then at the same time banning their employees from having MAGA and American flag masks and Trump 2020 bumper stickers (and lying about all of the above until videos of employee meetings surfaced) than it is worried about making quality tires.
  8. You’re very lucky if you can watch. After the bankruptcy, when they force-remodeled the remaining GM dealers, at my 2 dealers, they put a solid wall between the service writers and the bays where the work is done. With absolutely no customer admittance to the service bays due to “insurance” concerns. You leave the vehicle outside and you pick it up outside. The cashier is inside in a separate hallway near the parts dept—after all, they don’t want their $ to get wet or blow away.
  9. Your dealer (and others) are doing that to simplify their inventory. Conversely, some of them have been known to secretly pump one brand/one viscosity out of a barrel in the back for 50+ years now. Other than Corvettes and HiPo Camaros, GM switched to the Dexos oil spec for all other models in 2010, which at first mandated a synthetic-blend oil and now mandates a "full-synthetic" oil. They had to do this to mitigate warranty problems with the then-new VVT and AFM systems. As has already been said here, there are endless arguments over what constitutes a "full synthetic" motor oil. Basically, the oil companies can use whatever creative marketing they wish on their bottles/jugs/barrels. Synthetic oil should be fine for your 2006 Silverado. The only thing is, if you have an oil leak or seep or sweat or questionable oil gasket anywhere, you can count on it to get worse with the synthetic oil. I speak with personal experience with GMs on this over the last 25 years. A spot that 'sweats' with conventional motor oil will drip with synthetic, no matter what secret squirrel additive they are now putting in the synthetic mix. I have the driveway drips to prove that. Oh well, seals the blacktop, I suppose. Mobil1 was the hot thing in synthetic oil 20 years ago when there were not many options. Now regular Mobil1 is average, and there are several better rated synthetic oils out there. But you will get what your dealer stocks unless you do it yourself. Myself, at this point, I'd rather duct tape porkchops to my legs and run through a pack of coyotes nekkid than have a dealer do anything that I can do on my own.
  10. Some years back when AC Delco came out with their "improved" (NOT) e-core filters I did a lot of research and narrowed it down to Wix (or NAPA--built by Wix) or Purolator for our vehicles. There were too many reviews at the time that said Purolator had just sold and was having trouble with the pleats on their filter media--lots of pleats on one side, not so many on the other, with bad crimps and sometimes resulting holes in the filter media. So I went with Wix. Hopefully, Purolator has gotten their poop in a group since.
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