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therapy

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  1. My 2014 only has 50k miles on it, but I called in to get the recall anyway. I change the oil every 3-4k miles and full synthetic but never hurts to be cautious. Thanks to the OP for the heads up.
  2. The reason that a lot of people like trucks and big SUVs is because of the comfort. They ride high, offer great visibility, are huge inside with lots of room...yeah the handling and the speed and whatever aren't sports cars, but I'd rather drive a Suburban for a 8 hour drive than a Corvette for the same distance. I don't mind if they offer creature comforts. Having things like heated/cooled seats is pretty nice. I just wish they weren't all bundled together. Good luck trying to find a truck with cloth bucket seats and a NAV unit for example.
  3. It really does look good in the rendering. Reminds me of the GMT800 Suburban grill a little.
  4. I got one as a rental last year - maybe it was the trim line or something but I was far from impressed. I've been in police ford explorers that felt nicer.
  5. Haha...SERIOUSLY! Look at this thing: It looks like it was designed by four different teams that never got to talk to each other. The worst part is, the Infinity version is even uglier!
  6. Probably a combination of the 2018s finally being cleared off the lots (they were offering crazy deals on those) and people waiting to see what the 2019 deals were going to be. Seems to be pretty common. Sidenote - this is the first generation where I've actually really liked the looks of the WT base models.
  7. I just hope they offer the 6.2L in all trims. My wife's 2010 Suburban with the 5.3L is fine if it's just a few of us, but load it up with people and luggage and it gets a little sluggish comparatively. Also I'd love to see a Trail Boss or AT4 version with the cosmetic adjustments and the 2" factory lift. Not planning to offroad it or anything, just like the look a lot more and the extra height is nice for visibility.
  8. A quick check on Suburbans shows a 2019 4WD 1500 Premier has a sticker price of between $72k-$80k depending on features.. Most of them can be had for around $65k. Likewise, a search on 4WD 1500 Premier suburbans from 2016-2018 with less than 35k miles shows they average around $45k similarly equipped. So basically they lose $10k per 15k miles or so initially. You're 100% right that it doesn't hit the pickups as bad. The trucks stay high for a while, and the discounts are deeper when they have them. I remember buying my 2007 Sierra for $32k when the sticker price was $48k. Combination of cash back and special offers as the 2008s had just hit the lot, the economy was collapsing, and they were trying to move the 2007s. Seven years later in 2014, when it had 100k miles, I sold it for $20k. So I paid $12k for 100k miles.
  9. With German cars like Audi/Benz/BMW you're almost always better off leasing it unless you plan to drive the thing into the ground. If you're the kind of person who wants a new version every 2-3 years a lease makes way more sense for the German stuff. As for GM, they lose value pretty quickly too. Wife's 2010 Suburban stickered for $55k. I bought it used in 2013 with 40k miles on it for $30k. Still going strong with 140k miles now and just basic maintenance/service. So that first guy basically paid $8k/year (or $25,000 for 40k miles of use) and I bought the thing for just over 1/2 of the MSRP. Lots of full-size SUVs in the 2-3 year old range at fractions of their new cost with even less mileage. With the fully loaded Suburbans cresting $70k now I'm not sure why I'd buy a new one when I could wait 2 years and buy that same thing with 30k miles on it for $40k or something.
  10. Honestly, this is probably the best value right now. The 2019s are first model years which means there will be occasional bugs/issues that get worked out, whereas the 2018s are the last model year of this style meaning that they're likely as good as they're gonna get. If I were in the market for a new car I'd be all over the 2018 close-out deals. I like the 2019s but I don't think they're worth the premium over the crazy deals on 2018s right now. If you look around you get get a 2018 for $10-$12k less than a similarly equipped 2019 - and that's a hell of a lot of money. The other day I saw a 2018 Denali Ultimate for $53k somewhere, the 2019s are going to be $65k. And that's without any negotiating at all. EDIT: I realize how silly this sounds since I have a 2014 - literally first model year. Ironically before that, I had a 2007, again, first model year. But both those times circumstances gave me deals that were otherwise not possible. If I were buying from a dealership I'd be looking real hard at the 2018s.
  11. Though I'm not a fan of it, there's a LOT to like about the new Navigator/Expedition. GM needs to revamp pretty strongly - the existing 5.3 shouldn't even be an option on the suburban/yukon XL.
  12. Well my dad's first "new" car was a 72 Dodge Dart with the slant six, so I don't think there were tons of sexy options but that was a few years before my time... The past 40 years for cars has certainly been interesting - from the mid 70s to the early 90s most American cars seemed like garbage. Luckily the trucks have stayed pretty good for the most part.
  13. You're right as well, it's about efficiency. But that's not mutually exclusive with ASP. There's a double benefit for the manufacturer - they save time by bundling "popular" packages together (ie - rear backup sensors and power adjustable pedals) but that also benefits them by raising the price of the vehicle. And of course they have to do the bundles with all the feature options now. When my dad bought his first car in the 70s, there was a single option column - automatic or manual, color, power windows and door locks package, and cloth or vinyl basically. About 8 different things you could pick. Now there are hundreds.
  14. The logic is that if somebody wants that specific feature, then you force them to buy all the other stuff they may not necessarily want. For example, on my 07 Sierra, I wanted bucket seats but not leather, which was a huge pain in the ass, because there was like one trim line that made that possible, and it also required you to have power adjustable pedals and backup sensors, which I didn't give a shit about. They do bundles to force the average selling price of the truck higher. I always had the 5.3 in my Sierra, my Tahoe, my Suburban. Now I have the 6.2L and the difference is shockingly noticeable. I really like it. Which is gonna screw me when my wife's 2010 Suburban finally shits the bed because the only way to get a Suburban/Yukon XL with the 6.2L is on a luxury package like Denali. And the Suburban REALLY could use that 6.2L. It's heavy as hell, especially fully loaded. That 6.2L would be awesome.
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