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heymrdjCW

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About heymrdjCW

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  • Birthday 05/11/1989

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  1. While they can’t go back and do the truck’s stickers, I would imagine from just a powertrain standpoint, it works for 2019/20 as well. It doesn’t seem that any hardware changed, they just re-certified. That doesn’t mean there isn’t possibly different engine tuning that keeps the 2.7 from blowing a piston out of the block as it runs at Max capacity in Death Valley. Engine tune changes don’t really get published much year after year.
  2. 2.7 must be doing well in real world usage. I’m sure GM was conservative at first with the rating after watching Ford have the issue of using too large of a CAC that performed too well and caused condensation issues on early EcoBoost trucks. Now GM sees they did actually create enough cooling capacity for towing heavy. 2.7 keeps looking better! https://www.gm-trucks.com/2021-silverados-2-7l-3-0l-engines-get-price-drop-trailering-capacity-increase/
  3. Hoping it’s just a bad sensor. When I got a 2014 Buick Verano (best sedan I ever had, wish I never traded it in but the life of a traveling consultant is hard on the miles), it was about 3 months old when it left me stranded about 15 miles from home in the interstate with a low oil pressure warning. Buick was great and got it towed and got me a Regal loaner on a Sunday while they held it to look at on Monday morning. Long story short, it was just a bad sensor. They replaced it, I got the car back, and proceeded to never have an engine related issue again while I owned it (they did have to eventually replace a part of the steering column for a failed support bearing towards year 3 but that was all).
  4. Hoping it’s just a bad sensor. When I got a 2014 Buick Verano (best sedan I ever had, wish I never traded it in but the life of a traveling consultant is hard on the miles), it was about 3 months old when it left me stranded about 15 miles from home in the interstate with a low oil pressure warning. Buick was great and got it towed and got me a Regal loaner on a Sunday while they held it to look at on Monday morning. Long story short, it was just a bad sensor. They replaced it, I got the car back, and proceeded to never have an engine related issue again while I owned it (they did have to eventually replace a part of the steering column for a failed support bearing towards year 3 but that was all).
  5. Here in Fort Wayne, Diesel seems to be getting popular. When I walked the GMC lot 2 Sunday’s ago, there was 14 new Diesels of various trims in the staging parking. Now there’s only 6 still on the lot. I wish the diesel wasn’t such an expensive upgrade.
  6. That’s the truth, all the trucks these days have problems. Though my 2017 Silverado was always in the shop for odd electrical gremlins, my 2014 Dodge Dart limited (with every piece that could go wrong installed on it) had a better track record than it did. I don’t know that I necessarily believe your dealer’s advice on RAM, my GMC/Chevy/Ford/Volvo/RAM/Jeep/BMW group of dealers under the same company is sick and tired of GM’s crap 8 speed transmissions. My friend in the service department wishes that the 8 speed transmission in the Colorado/Canyon never existed, as it took GM far too long to come up with a proper fix, leaving them to shoulder the public backlash of frustrated customers. Oh and the 2019 F-350 doesn’t have a V10, in regular or chassis cab form.
  7. Over here in Fort Wayne, I know what you’re talking about. Still have some areas with no power. It was quite the wind that came through, though faired better than some other areas nearby.
  8. Tekonsha lists the 3016-P harness for the 2016 and the 3064-P for the 2020. The picture for the harness looks like a different shape as well, so I’d say he’s going to need a new one.
  9. Pretty sure that’s not certified for gasoline use, I don’t think any of them are due to the flashpoint factor. Only mentioned it because the police that had nothing better to do caught one of the RV transport trucks on a DOT stop and noticed it was a gasser, and the transfer tank full of gasoline. DOT doesn’t like non-DOT certified containers hauling gasoline.
  10. Thanks for sharing your experience. There seems to be some all over the place experiences between Ford and Chevy. For our department, hands down the 6.2 truck has been the longer lasting truck over the 6.0 Chevy. That’s not just a powertrain view, that’s a whole truck view. We have many of them over 250,000 and the truck has held together. Had issues with both models, the Chevy stuff being a little newer, but that’s our experiences. Mainly dump and service bodies. I really don’t think you can go wrong with either truck. Money saved on one issue will get lost on another.
  11. They must have fixed it for the 18 redesign, as my 2019 Terrain Denali doesn't have that issue. I wasn't very fond of the interior when I test drove one back in 17 though.
  12. I don’t think you’re a fanatic at all. I know they changed the 2020 stuff on the Fords but I wasn’t sure how much. Haven’t had a chance to play with one [emoji16]. I generally get good info out of the Elkhart teams, but I haven’t had a chance to talk about the 2020 Fords with anyone. And as I said, my dealer doesn’t have any decently loaded ones that aren’t sold already. I appreciate the first hand experience.
  13. I’m curious what tools were different from the two. From what I’ve seen, all big three are offering the same packages when it comes to trailer mounted cameras, above cab cameras, trailer TPMS etc. I haven’t had a chance to check out a loaded out 2020 Ford as they have been selling them basically as they come in, but online I didn’t see much of a difference.
  14. Probably because it’s designed for it. There’s a good few threads of people taking delivery of 2020’s and seeing 210-220F fluid range on the empty truck. We aren’t seeing what the computer sees and decides in terms of fluid flow. Modern transmissions have been designed to run hotter and hotter because that’s where efficiency is. A lot of them even take engine coolant to get the transmission to operating temperature faster. The MerconLV fluid is rated at 250F, and over 250F for 30 minutes before causing harm. The powertrain engineers probably have it figured out a lot better than the armchair engineers.
  15. My Canyon will be ready to trade in about 2021, so I’m watching the Yukon not XL Diesel closely.
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