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Slip Yoke Clunk


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Just today my newly acquired truck has developed the famous slip yoke clunk. I gotta pull the drive shaft and lube it coz' its annoying the heck outta me. What kind of grease do you DIY's find works best (longest lasting) if any? I was thinking of using dino chassis/wheel bearing grease unless you guys find something else works better.

 

Thanks, Don

 

99 GMC SIERRA 1500 ECSB

5.3, 4L60-E Trans.

3.42:1 Rear Axle

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Just today my newly acquired truck has developed the famous slip yoke clunk. I gotta pull the drive shaft and lube it coz' its annoying the heck outta me. What kind of grease do you DIY's  find works best (longest lasting) if any? I was thinking of using dino chassis/wheel bearing grease unless you guys find something else works better.

 

                                                                         Thanks, Don

 

99 GMC SIERRA 1500 ECSB

5.3,   4L60-E Trans.

3.42:1 Rear Axle

 

 

 

 

 

I would use real thick grease. For example, marine grease, such as OMC triple guard grease, which is used for lubing propeller shafts, would be ideal. this grease is really sticky and does not wash off . Boat propeller shafts are splined too.

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If your truck is a 2WD, 2-piece driveshaft I might have an answer. If you'll notice, the clunk doesn't happen when it's really cold. That's because the rear springs/rear-end is moving AFTER the truck stops, but only when the temperature rises to a warmer level. I found a way to eliminate about 90% of it a couple of years ago. I bought a hard rubber ball at Wal-Mart [ toy dept ] that will just fit into the hole that the splines fit into. Remove the rear half of the driveshaft. Grease up the hole and insert the rubber ball. Then grease up the splines and put the 2 pieces of the driveshaft back together. Re-assemble. The hard rubber ball helps prevent the srings/rear end from moving AFTER the truck has come to a stop. I'm still hunting for a hard piece of rubber that is about a 1/4" longer to fit into the splines to completely eliminate the " clunk ".

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Sea Doo developed a similar fix for their jet skis to eliminate the driveshaft clunk inside the jet pump housing. They added a sping loaded plastic bumper to the jet pump cover cone-shaped cover. The bumper pushes on the end of the floating shaft and keeps the noise down.

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If your truck is a 2WD, 2-piece driveshaft I might have an answer.  If you'll notice, the clunk doesn't happen when it's really cold.  That's because the rear springs/rear-end is moving AFTER the truck stops, but only when the temperature rises to a warmer level.  I found a way to eliminate about 90% of it a couple of years ago.  I bought a hard rubber ball at Wal-Mart [ toy dept ] that will just fit into the hole that the splines fit into.  Remove the rear half of the driveshaft.  Grease up the hole and insert the rubber ball.  Then grease up the splines and put the 2 pieces of the driveshaft back together.  Re-assemble.  The hard rubber ball helps prevent the srings/rear end from moving AFTER the truck has come to a stop.  I'm still hunting for a hard piece of rubber that is about a 1/4" longer to fit into the splines to completely eliminate the " clunk ".

 

 

 

 

It is a 2WD 2-piece driveshaft. I didn't notice it when I test drove it before I bought it, but I bought it in the winter. Now it is in the 60's here this week and has started clunking, so you are right, temperature affects it. Just so happens I have to go to Wally-Mart tomorrow and I'll look for a small rubber ball and give it a try.

 

I never thought of using marine grease, excellent idea pm26. I'll give it a try.

 

Thank you gentlemen for your replies, Don.

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triple guard grease

 

Keep in mind that the marine grease I mentioned is special propeller shaft grease. It is extremely thick and sticky and dark blue in color. It is not regular marine trailer bearing grease. Its trade name is OMC triple guard grease. OMC has been taken over by the Evinrude/Johnson Corporation, but they still sell the grease. You need to go to a boat dealership to get it. It comes in a toothpaste-like tube, only larger.

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