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Fender trimming help


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OK I bought some used 35s, and SUPRISE, they rub slightly. They dont rub as bad as some because I purposely bought wheels with a 0 offset rather than a negative one, but they still rub none the less. Im gonna continue to run them because I payed $550 for em, but I dont want to have to worry about tearing my truck up.

 

So, I thought about new keys up front, but I already have Tuff country 2" (supposedly) keys on there and the passenger side is already maxed. They only gave me 1" increase before the big beefy bumper, and then I think I lost that when the bumper went on. Now Im uncertain if a different brand of keys would allow me another inch or two.

 

That being said, I began to concider fender modification. Ide rather not cut it up, but would rather massage it out of the way. But, if cutting is required, I would like to do it in a way that it doesnt look evident. I dont want it to look like a hack job either.

 

The main reason I dont want to get too carried away is because I am thinking that when these wear out, Im gonna step down to a 305/70/17 (34"). That would open up the wheel wells more and I dont want to see a bunch of cutting and butchery under there.

 

Does anyone have, or can get, pictures of what they trimmed and where. I looked for a How-To on this subject, but I couldnt seem to locate one.

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If no one answers I've heard of something called chalking. I guess you just use a piece of chalk to color part of the tire or wheel well liner (not the fender?) and make it rub a little. You trim wherever the chalk rubs off. No personal experience but I'm pretty sure this is what most mean by trimming. Testing should be done on surfaces that will make the front end shift weight from one wheel to the other, which will cause the most rubbing.

 

If the body itself rubs, Bushwhacker makes cut-out fender flares. With these you mark off certain areas of the fender and cut them off with a reciprocating saw. The kit opens like an inch or more to each side of all four fenders, except the front bumper area. I decided against them myself, mainly because they look squarish on my Sierra but with your front bumper and the more rectangular silverado front end it might good.

 

In the end I decided to look for smaller tires. If the rubbing's not too bad you may just want to wait it out.

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If no one answers I've heard of something called chalking. I guess you just use a piece of chalk to color part of the tire or wheel well liner (not the fender?) and make it rub a little. You trim wherever the chalk rubs off. No personal experience but I'm pretty sure this is what most mean by trimming. Testing should be done on surfaces that will make the front end shift weight from one wheel to the other, which will cause the most rubbing.

 

If the body itself rubs, Bushwhacker makes cut-out fender flares. With these you mark off certain areas of the fender and cut them off with a reciprocating saw. The kit opens like an inch or more to each side of all four fenders, except the front bumper area. I decided against them myself, mainly because they look squarish on my Sierra but with your front bumper and the more rectangular silverado front end it might good.

 

In the end I decided to look for smaller tires. If the rubbing's not too bad you may just want to wait it out.

 

 

 

I actually figured it out today. I used a similar process that I would call dirting instead of chalking. I just trimmed where the dirt was rubbed off, which was on the driver side fenderwell on the rear portion. The rubbing sound I was hearing was actually the driver side tire grabbing on the front fender liner, not the passenger side rear liner like i though. I quick slice of some plastic and Presto, no rubbing.

 

Im so glad I didnt have to cut any metal. That stuff cpark posted up kinda made me uneasy.

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