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Able

Plowing with a 1.8 yard spreader?

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I was wondering if the 2020 3500 6.6 gasser will have the power needed ?

or is the diesel the way to go?

looking to replace my 2008 f350 diesel

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I'd say it would do it but not as easy as the Diesel....went gas and only plowing no spreader

Sent from my Moto Z (2) using Tapatalk

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That’s why I been hearing , I currently have a 8’ western pro plus steel plow and western 1.8 spreader. I wanted to go gas to get away from the constant diesel issues but I guess I’ll have to buy diesel again...

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I would really consider a gas if plowing.  You can carry a larger plow on a gas than diesel without going over FGAWR.  I don't have much experience plowing.  The tradeoff with gas plow trucks is they ride rougher in summer due to the higher spring rates.  

 

#iworkforGM 

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Thank you but how and why can you use a bigger plow on a gas 3500? Versus the diesel 3500

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As noted, front gross axle weight rating I think. The diesel motor is much heavier and puts more weight on front axle. I believe they use heavier torsion bars but not necessarily to entirely offset the extra weight of the motor.

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Typically the difference between the FGAWR and the existing weight on the front axle when you have a gas engine is bigger compared to a diesel.  Basically you have less weight to start with so you have more room for the plow.  If anything else it means less wear and tear on the front end components. I live In Vermont and everyone around here plows. The overwhelming majority plow with a gas truck.  Lower initial cost, lower cost to operate and less room for potential problems. I dont think you'll have any issues with the 6.6 gas and it'll probably cost you less in the long run. 

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