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Should I use Deep Cycle Batteries or not?


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OK, guys I need a bit of advice here. I've got an '03 Duramax with dual batteries & according to the GM Dealer they both failed under load so I have to replace them. I go camping quite a bit and often play my stereo for hours (3+) at a time, I also often use a small Inverter to power my MP3 player and/or laptop. I also tow a 38' 5th wheel. Here are the questions I'm asking myself: 1) should I go with Deep Cycle batteries or not? 2) should I go with Optima Batteries or Interstate?

 

The service advisor was ready to sell my either battery (Optima or Interstate), however the Tech told me that he's noticed that the diesels crank over slower with the Optima batteries so he would recommend the Interstate.

 

As far as Deep Cycle or not, they didn't seem to think I need them but I'm not completely convinced.

 

Need your input?

 

Thanks.

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OK, guys I need a bit of advice here.  I've got an '03 Duramax with dual batteries & according to the GM Dealer they both failed under load so I have to replace them.  I go camping quite a bit and often play my stereo for hours (3+) at a time, I also often use a small Inverter to power my MP3 player and/or laptop.  I also tow a 38' 5th wheel.  Here are the questions I'm asking myself:  1) should I go with Deep Cycle batteries or not? 2) should I go with Optima Batteries or Interstate?

 

The service advisor was ready to sell my either battery (Optima or Interstate), however the Tech told me that he's noticed that the diesels crank over slower with the Optima batteries so he would recommend the Interstate.

 

As far as Deep Cycle or not, they didn't seem to think I need them but I'm not completely convinced.

 

Need your input?

 

Thanks.

 

 

 

 

 

You do not want too use deep cycle batteries in your truck because they do have greatly reduced starting current due to design. The make a batteries deep cycle the use a heavier plate design to resist warping and collapse from repeated full discharges and fewer of them to allow better circulation of the acid between plates as well. This reduces power density and reduces starting current vs a regular car battery. As far as brand, there is a lot of debate there. Pay attention to 3 things when you buy them. The CCA (cold cranking amps), the reserve capacity (number of minutes it will hold a 25 amp load and the actuall siz of battery too (because the bigger it is the more acid it will hold and have more reserve capacity. There is little to be gained here with high dollar batteries just always replace them in pairs and get them big. A top end Walmart brand battery will work fine and expect to replace them every 2 or 3 years if you start a lot in cold climates to maintain maximum starting power rather than paying 2x or 3x as much for a exotic battery that will likely not last much longer.

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Deep Cycle is deifinitely a bad choice as a starting battery. The details are written above.

 

That said, I starting battery is designed for that, starting. If you are running your stereo, etc... with the truck off for extended periods, you will kill those starting batteries. For that kind of work you really need a deep cycle. Also, if you are charging or running anything in the Fiver, be aware that the 12 volt auxillary line in the tow harness is always on (not ignition switched). So, your Fiver is likely drawing hard on your batteries when hooked up.

 

So, if you plan to run the stereo and accessories alot with the truck off, I would look into putting those accessories on at least one deep cycle (group 31 - Interstate or other), and replacing your starting batteries with some good starting batteries (interstate, Duralast), taking into consideration what jcc listed above. Then setup an isolator (RV store, etc will carry) to charge those deep cycles while cruising around, but not drain the starting batteries when the truck is off.

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Deep Cycle is deifinitely a bad choice as a starting battery.  The details are written above. 

 

That said, I starting battery is designed for that, starting.  If you are running your stereo, etc... with the truck off for extended periods, you will kill those starting batteries.  For that kind of work you really need a deep cycle.  Also, if you are charging or running anything in the Fiver, be aware that the 12 volt auxillary line in the tow harness is always on (not ignition switched).  So, your Fiver is likely drawing hard on your batteries when hooked up.

 

So, if you plan to run the stereo and accessories alot with the truck off, I would look into putting those accessories on at least one deep cycle (group 31 - Interstate or other), and replacing your starting batteries with some good starting batteries (interstate, Duralast), taking into consideration what jcc listed above.  Then setup an isolator (RV store, etc  will carry) to charge those deep cycles while cruising around, but not drain the starting batteries when the truck is off.

 

 

 

 

 

I would not botther with a extra deep cycle battery I think. It would be cheaper and easier to get two new batteries every few years because if you take two batteries rated at 140 min @25 amp in parrallel they will do a lot better than 280 mins (140 +140) because battery capacity increases as discharge rate per battery decreases when parralleling batteries. A stereo for 3 hours would be not much problem capacity wise and would draw at the most maybe 20% or so of storage. Something that I would recommand though is the installation of a high value electrolitic capacitor in parrallel with raidopower terminals if you have a after market hi power stereo. The reason for this is that such a radio creates a constantly changing dynamic load on battery (it can change from 2 amps to 20 amps or more several times a second and this does not promote good battery efficency in the conversion of energy stored in it. It also shortens their life charging because the charge current will tend to swing wildly with it to. What a capacitor will do is soften these swings and yeild a lower average draw on battery with no big peaks or valleys. I used to use 2 way ham radio equipment mobile for many years and with truck off too and some times for several hours at loads averaging 20 to 25 amps in draw plus sometimes a interior light ot two also and I never had a problem with dual batteries.

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OK, guys I need a bit of advice here.  I've got an '03 Duramax with dual batteries & according to the GM Dealer they both failed under load so I have to replace them.  I go camping quite a bit and often play my stereo for hours (3+) at a time, I also often use a small Inverter to power my MP3 player and/or laptop.  I also tow a 38' 5th wheel.  Here are the questions I'm asking myself:  1) should I go with Deep Cycle batteries or not? 2) should I go with Optima Batteries or Interstate?

 

The service advisor was ready to sell my either battery (Optima or Interstate), however the Tech told me that he's noticed that the diesels crank over slower with the Optima batteries so he would recommend the Interstate.

 

As far as Deep Cycle or not, they didn't seem to think I need them but I'm not completely convinced.

 

Need your input?

 

Thanks.

 

 

 

 

As others have said no Deep cycle.

 

Details on batteries at:

 

http://www.batteryfaq.org

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