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Beamie

Differential Cover Paint?

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Does a differential get hot enough to require engine enamal or other high temperature paint to refinish the cover?

I've used VHT Epoxy on other chassis items with good luck but it's noted for 250 F degree limit.

We have a 3.73 locker in our Tahoe if that makes any difference.

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From East Coast Gear Supply:

 

  Temp Reference Chart – oil change frequency

o 170 Deg - 100,000 Miles

o 200 Deg - 50,000 Miles

o 220 Deg - 25,000 Miles

o 240 Deg - 12,000 Miles

o 260 Deg - 5,000 Miles

o 260-300 Deg – 500-1000 Miles until Temp is controlled

 

 Differential Temp Guide

 

o 250-275 Degrees is Normal for new differentials breaking in, do not Tow or take long road trips for first 500 miles as this builds additional heat. 300 degrees is to hot and diff should be allowed to cool.

 

o Normal operating Temp for a differential adequate for vehicle in stock applications 170-220 degrees

 

o Normal operating Temp - Large tires, Undersized Differentials, Towing 200-250 Degrees.

 

 Final Notes o Change your oil frequently your diff will thank you o If water is ever introduced to differential change it immediately, keep in mind that a differential that is hot and then becomes cool will naturally draw in moisture, so it is not always a water crossing that causes moisture contamination, always run a vent to a dry area and insure it breathes easily

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Painted diff cover here. Sand blasted it and painted it with this. bfb3b48edfac7f4467b575feacd92b2a.jpg


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

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On 7/3/2020 at 6:56 PM, Grumpy Bear said:

From East Coast Gear Supply:

 

  Temp Reference Chart – oil change frequency

o 170 Deg - 100,000 Miles

o 200 Deg - 50,000 Miles

o 220 Deg - 25,000 Miles

o 240 Deg - 12,000 Miles

o 260 Deg - 5,000 Miles

o 260-300 Deg – 500-1000 Miles until Temp is controlled

 

 Differential Temp Guide

 

o 250-275 Degrees is Normal for new differentials breaking in, do not Tow or take long road trips for first 500 miles as this builds additional heat. 300 degrees is to hot and diff should be allowed to cool.

 

o Normal operating Temp for a differential adequate for vehicle in stock applications 170-220 degrees

 

o Normal operating Temp - Large tires, Undersized Differentials, Towing 200-250 Degrees.

 

 Final Notes o Change your oil frequently your diff will thank you o If water is ever introduced to differential change it immediately, keep in mind that a differential that is hot and then becomes cool will naturally draw in moisture, so it is not always a water crossing that causes moisture contamination, always run a vent to a dry area and insure it breathes easily

Thanks. I like all the detail.

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Posted (edited)

Seems that paint rated for 250 degrees will be ok for our 12 year old truck.

I think the Epoxy is best around here where the winter roads are covered in blue-green chemicals.

Edited by Beamie
  • Haha 1

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