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Help with towin? 5000lb


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Im going to be towing a 5000 lb, 26ft travel trailer this summer. I have never towed anything before. I know my truck is rated to tow 8300 lbs. It is a 04 z71 reg cab, 3.73 gears. What should I expect from towing something like this? My truck has the towing package. Im going from atlanta into the tennessee mountains and back.. some 400 miles round trip.. help :)

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Is your truck a long bed or short bed?

If you have the 5.3, it'll tow just fine but with a short wheelbase you wont want to go too fast. The hills there will make it work a bit but you should have trailer brakes and a sway bar. If your truck is a shortbed, you will NEED a sway bar. I tow a 27' trailer with a short bed, extended cab and if I get too fast or in a good wind, it will sway a bit.

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Im going to be towing a 5000 lb, 26ft  travel trailer this summer. I have never towed anything before. I know my truck is rated to tow 8300 lbs. It is a 04 z71 reg cab, 3.73 gears. What should I expect from towing something like this? My truck has the towing package. Im going from atlanta into the tennessee mountains and back.. some 400 miles round trip.. help  :)

 

 

 

 

 

Yeah.. I got the short bed..

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You will have no problem towing a 5000 lb trailer. Keep in mind every time the tranny shifts, it is heating up, so if it's searching in and out of D and 3rd, that's how you will get premature transmission failure.

 

I found a great site for towing tips. www.rvtowingtips.com You will find every thing you need and more. I hope this helps.

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Are you sure the trailer only weighs 5K? My 23' Travel Trailer weighs almost 5K empty.

 

I would ignore the max tow rating as well, heres why. 99.9% of the time when pulling a trailer with a 1500 you'll exceed the GVWR of the truck long before you ever get to the "max" tow rating. IIRC the NBS 1500 series trucks have a GVWR of 6400 lbs. That means that your truck can't weigh any more than 6400lbs.

 

After you add the tongue weight,passengers,load the bed with camping stuff,ect,you need to be under 6400lbs. You need to watch the axle weight as well.

 

You should really get your truck and trailer weighed to see how much weight capacity you have left. It would really suck to watch your rear tire zip past you on the freeway,because you overloaded the axle.

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Are you sure the trailer only weighs 5K? My 23' Travel Trailer weighs almost 5K empty.

 

I would ignore the max tow rating as well, heres why. 99.9% of the time when pulling a trailer with a 1500 you'll exceed the GVWR of the truck long before you ever get to the "max" tow rating. IIRC the NBS 1500 series trucks have a GVWR of 6400 lbs. That means that your truck can't weigh any more than 6400lbs.

 

After you add the tongue weight,passengers,load the bed with camping stuff,ect,you need to be under 6400lbs. You need to watch the axle weight as well.

 

You should really get your truck and trailer weighed to see how much weight capacity you have left.  It would really suck to watch your rear tire zip past you on the freeway,because you overloaded the axle.

 

 

 

 

 

Yeah .. the trailer is 5000lbs.. atleast thats what the company told me I am renting it from.. Im taking two vehicles.. so all the camping gear goes in the other truck.. mine would just tow the trailer..

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Your right on my comfort Fringe for towing. Pulling a 26 footer is alot for a half ton. When you get to the camp ground, look at the rigs around and who's pulling what with what.

 

There are some good sites on the web about camping, put some google time in too. Running that camper and truck empty should be fine, make sure you get a good brake controller. I;ve heard alot raves about the newest teknosha, I hated the teknosha I had on my 97, but it was older model. I'm running a Draw tite now and I'm happy with it.

 

Check out how loaded campers and trucks look now when your driving, its down right scary how bad people overload. When you see a 1/2 ton riding low on the rear axle, you know those P rated tires are hotter then heck.

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You will have no problem towing a 5000 lb trailer. Keep in mind every time the tranny shifts, it is heating up, so if it's searching in and out of D and 3rd, that's how you will get premature transmission failure.

 

I found a great site for towing tips. www.rvtowingtips.com You will find every thing you need and more. I hope this helps.

 

 

 

 

 

Not really because when it downshifts it is increases engine RPM above torque converter stall where most heat is made (which generally actually ends at about 2500 RPM or so though the rated stall speed may be lower) Lower gears also reduce engine torque input requirment for the load which can reduce heat. Lower RPM is not always better when towing though some will lead you to believe that. ALso since you are towing in hills make sure your truck has a aux tranny cooler because you are not only dealing with weight but wind drag too and when towing it is not a flat equation as some would suggest because it is a combination of weight, drag and terrain that determines true tow capacity because what might work in Indiana will not work in the hills of Tennesee or West VA, VA and Carolinas and the same goes for towing in the rockies. Take you time on hills that pull hard and do not try to race up them and you should not have any problems. I never tow floor boarded on a hill and find a speed that feels good if hill is too steep for normal cruising.

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Are you sure the trailer only weighs 5K? My 23' Travel Trailer weighs almost 5K empty.

 

I would ignore the max tow rating as well, heres why. 99.9% of the time when pulling a trailer with a 1500 you'll exceed the GVWR of the truck long before you ever get to the "max" tow rating. IIRC the NBS 1500 series trucks have a GVWR of 6400 lbs. That means that your truck can't weigh any more than 6400lbs.

 

After you add the tongue weight,passengers,load the bed with camping stuff,ect,you need to be under 6400lbs. You need to watch the axle weight as well.

 

You should really get your truck and trailer weighed to see how much weight capacity you have left.  It would really suck to watch your rear tire zip past you on the freeway,because you overloaded the axle.

 

 

 

 

 

Yeah .. the trailer is 5000lbs.. atleast thats what the company told me I am renting it from.. Im taking two vehicles.. so all the camping gear goes in the other truck.. mine would just tow the trailer..

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Well, I guess I wouldnt be towing with the bumper itself.. its that reciever under the bumper.. I noticed its connected to the frame and has springs under it.. My brother actually wants to tow it in his f150 with a sissy little v6 and a five speed.. I tried to tell him he might get it there but hed leave his clutch on the road.. :)

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Guest chevydeerhunter

About three years ago, I bought a used 29' Alumalite and pulled it about 30 miles home with my 00 Silverado with an auto tranny and 4.3 V-6. I never went above 60 and the only problems I had were going over overpasses. Of course, I never intended to do any long hauling with that truck, but that 4.3 struggled a bit. I believe the trailer weighed around 4500lbs and this was towing it on the flat landscape of the South plains of Texas. I can't imagine pulling that over anything remotely hilly.

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Are you sure the trailer only weighs 5K? My 23' Travel Trailer weighs almost 5K empty.

 

I would ignore the max tow rating as well, heres why. 99.9% of the time when pulling a trailer with a 1500 you'll exceed the GVWR of the truck long before you ever get to the "max" tow rating. IIRC the NBS 1500 series trucks have a GVWR of 6400 lbs. That means that your truck can't weigh any more than 6400lbs.

 

After you add the tongue weight,passengers,load the bed with camping stuff,ect,you need to be under 6400lbs. You need to watch the axle weight as well.

 

You should really get your truck and trailer weighed to see how much weight capacity you have left.  It would really suck to watch your rear tire zip past you on the freeway,because you overloaded the axle.

 

 

 

 

 

Yeah .. the trailer is 5000lbs.. atleast thats what the company told me I am renting it from.. Im taking two vehicles.. so all the camping gear goes in the other truck.. mine would just tow the trailer..

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Well, I guess I wouldnt be towing with the bumper itself.. its that reciever under the bumper.. I noticed its connected to the frame and has springs under it.. My brother actually wants to tow it in his f150 with a sissy little v6 and a five speed.. I tried to tell him he might get it there but hed leave his clutch on the road.. :jester:

 

 

 

 

 

 

Several years ago a friend of mine with a Ford F150 4x4 and a 6 with a 4 speed got a flatbed trailer and came over and we loaded my tractor on it with a back blade to haul over to his place about 20 miles away to level his yard. I offer to use my truck to pull it but he wanted to see how his would do. The tractor and blade weighted about 4200 lbs and the trailer about 3000. We made it there and back but never really got above 45 mph or so in 3rd gear as it would not accelerate in 4th at all and while this weighted more than trailer in question, it had a lot less wind drag because of it low profiles verse a travel trailer.

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The 5.3 is a gutsy engine that just loves to rev. With a 3.73 or 4.10 rear end and spring bars, you'll have no problems. I do it several times every year and I added Load Range E tires (10-ply) and really heavy-duty shocks. Works for me.

 

Absulutely, be sure to use the tow-haul mode and leave the gear selector in "3."

 

Steve

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You'll be fine,in Wyoming you can haul 2 traliers........we see 28ft Campers with boats on behind that.Thats not recommended but we see it alot.............not behind 1/2 ton Fords or Dodges.....usually 1/2 ton GMs!

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where you headed? gatlinburg?

them little i6 f150s was pulling machines. well slow any way. dad still had his 92, when I got my 95 gmc Z-71 with a 350 and 5 speed. moving a trailer around the farm, his did a better job be cause his power was lower in the rpm range. now on the road where I could stay a gear lower than him, well it's different story.

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