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rkj__

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rkj__ last won the day on December 6 2018

rkj__ had the most liked content!

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About rkj__

  • Rank
    Enthusiast

Profile Information

  • Name
    Ryan
  • Location
    St Catharines, Ontario, Canada
  • Gender
  • Drives
    2018 Sierra Elevation 5.3 4x4 Dbl Cab
  1. My '72 K10 RC Crawler

    This is a ready to run model, that came complete with everything, including the body. All I had to do was put in a battery. Being a crawler, it’s not fast, but it’s well above a walking pace. Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
  2. Post Pics of Your 2014+

    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
  3. My K2 just has the small chrome 4x4 decal on the front fender. A coworker asked me if it was a 4x4, since he did not see an obnoxiously large decal on the bedside. Personally, I don't mind small, discreet badging. I don't mind the bigger bedside badges either. Basically, I care that the truck is a 4x4, not that everybody else knows it's a 4x4.
  4. This would be relevant, but it takes an awful lot of "rules" and cooperation / truck availability from the offices loaning out the test vehicles to try and get an apples to apples comparison. I've seen some media outlets screw it up fairly badly. For example, if one company sends a crew cab, and one sends a double cab, the double cab is probably going to have more options than the crew, at the same pricepoint. Shopping for a full size pickup is pretty easy, without the help of too much media though. There are only 5 options (GM, Ram, Ford, Toyota, Nissan), and most buyers can rule out two or three of those right off the bat, based on their own preferences and biases. For me, I axed the Nissan, Toyota, and Ram based on appearance, standard features, or economy, so it was just between the Ford and the GM. GM had better discounts and financing rate, so that was that. Easy.
  5. Winter tires perform better: -On dry pavement, in very cold temperatures -On wet pavement in cold temperatures -On snow -On ice It's not only on snow covered roads you see a benefit. Yes, smart driving strategies can prevent many accidents. Traveling at a safe speed, and following at a safe distance are always a good idea. However, sometimes when driving, you have to react to the poor decisions of other drivers. Having more traction when responding to emergency events could literally save your life. Like when some idiot on bald tires flies by you on the highway, changes lanes, loses control, and bounces off the median in front of you. But, you have a strong opinion, and I'm not going to change your mind. That's fine. Really though, I'm not spending a lot of coin on winter tires. The tires cost me about $400. I bought them used, after the previous owner used them for one winter. Like the tires, the wheels they are mounted on were from my old truck. I bought the wheels over 5 years ago. Winter tires wear a little bit faster than all season highway tires, sure, but not so much so that I have to replace them every couple of years. So, the money I spend on "faster tire wear" is nearly insignificant. I change them myself, so there is no cost to the seasonal swap. Next, you claim winter tires are wasting my time. I can mount my winter setup as fast, or faster than I could rotate 4 tires. If you think rotating your tires is a waste of time, I really should just stop typing now I suppose. Anyway, if my winter tires help me avoid one crash on the highway, on a dark winter night, far from home, I'd say they were worth a lifetime of seasonal tire changes. Have a safe winter, rkj__
  6. Nothing beats a winter tire in the winter. I highly suggest a second set of wheels with winter tires. I tried my OEM Continentals in the first snowfall of the year, and I got where I was going, but the truck did not feel very sure footed. Accelerating in 2WD was exceptionally poor. Take those SRAs you paid for, and put them on the shelf until spring.
  7. I like the idea of electric for much of my driving, but charging infrastructure in remote areas is a deterrent. I'd rather have a plug in hybrid that delivers commuting via battery, and road trips with the trailer via a strong gas engine.
  8. My '72 K10 RC Crawler

    Selling my lifted Canyon left a hole. My new Sierra is a nice truck, but it's too big and low for off road trails, and I'm several hours away from any off road trails anyway. So, I got a new rig, that I can crawl around in almost anywhere! It's a Vaterra Ascender 1/10 RC. It's been a lot of fun!
  9. Exactly. Gear ratio alone changes tow ratings typically. Changing tire size is comparable to changing gears. Also be mindful of the load ratings on 22 “ tires and wheels. Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
  10. One things magazines can't do for you is compare dollar for dollar the truck you want to buy. They'll compare MSRP's, but can't compare actual discounts and lot availability. They'll give you starting prices, and MSRPs of loaded trucks, but it is up to the buyer to decide which mid range truck is worthy of their hard earned dollars.
  11. Post Pics of Your 2014+

    Did you trade the ZR2, or add a second truck?
  12. I could have driven my wife's Mini Countryman, and saved some fuel cost, but that vehicle seems to be having some battery charging issues, which I did not want to worry about. The truck is quieter, and more comfortable. I'll pay a fuel economy penalty, to a point. If the truck got 13mpg, it would have been a no-go for the trip.
  13. Over 21 mpg with a lift is very good. I just did 1,000 highway km in my truck. 2018, 5.3L, air dam delete, winter tires, tonneau cover, winter gas. It got a respectable 11.3 L/100km (21 mpg US). It can do better in the summer.
  14. Post Pics of Your 2014+

    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
  15. New Silverado Commercial

    Not much to hate there. Seems decent. Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
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