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OK, I just ordered a set of subs and an amp online last night, and I need some help. The subs are Rockford Fosgate R1S410, 10", 4 ohm subs with a rating of 150 RMS and 300 max. The amp is a Kicker DX250.1 mono with a 250 2ohm rating, and a 140 4 ohm rating. I want to make sure I hook the subs up to get the most out of them, but I dont want to burn anything up either.

 

The only experience Ive had in the past is with either a single sub setup, or with two subs on a multi-channel amp. Either way, each sub had its own channel, so I have no experience wiring two subs to the same amp channel.

 

So, correct me if Im wrong, but in my case, dont I hook the amps in series, running one positive from the amp, to sub #1, then to sub #2, and the same for the negative?

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You bridge the 2 subs. It will drop you down to 2 ohms and yes both sub +'s go to the same point on the amp and the same for the -'s

 

Sent from my DROID RAZR MAXX using Xparent Red Tapatalk 2

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OK, I just ordered a set of subs and an amp online last night, and I need some help. The subs are Rockford Fosgate R1S410, 10", 4 ohm subs with a rating of 150 RMS and 300 max. The amp is a Kicker DX250.1 mono with a 250 2ohm rating, and a 140 4 ohm rating. I want to make sure I hook the subs up to get the most out of them, but I dont want to burn anything up either.

 

The only experience Ive had in the past is with either a single sub setup, or with two subs on a multi-channel amp. Either way, each sub had its own channel, so I have no experience wiring two subs to the same amp channel.

 

So, correct me if Im wrong, but in my case, dont I hook the amps in series, running one positive from the amp, to sub #1, then to sub #2, and the same for the negative?

 

If you hook the SUBS up in series; running one positive from the amp to sub #1 and then take the negative from that sub to the positive of sub #2, then the negative from that sub back to the amp you will have a series. And an 8 ohm load. Series means exactly that one after the other. The amp will see one giant resistance of 8 ohms, this is the safest way to run the amp, it will run very cool.... but you will get half the power of a 4 ohm load.

 

If you hook the subs up in parallel: Run wires from the positive side of the amp - two wires one going to each of the positives on the sub. Run wires from the negative side of the amp - two wires one going to each of the negatives on the sub. In parallel you will create a 2 ohm load 1/Rt= 1/R1 + 1/R2

 

In parallel the amp will run much hotter, as the amp is seeing a lower resistance load.

 

 

You don't have a 4 ohm choice unless you are running one sub, or change subs to a dual voice coil sub. (two dvc's will act like 4 speakers, as far as the wiring goes.)

 

So you can run your subs in parallel and get a 2 ohm load and be safe and get 250 watts total out of the system (125 watts per sub)

You can run your subs in series for an 8 ohm load and get only 125 - 150watts total out of the system (62.5 - 75 watts per sub)

 

you can run one sub at 4 ohms and push 140 watts to that one sub.

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OK, thanks.

 

Sorry I was confused before, I meant to say "paralell" not "series". It was late (for me anyway) and I wasnt thinking straight I guess.

 

Anyhow, If I run them in parallel, how much heat are we talking? The amp has the capability of running a 2ohm load, but will there still be a risk of overheating like that, especially since Im mounting it to the floor under my rear seat?

 

Ide like to get the most power to the subs for when I crank it up. However, the older I get, the less often I crank it up. Ide say that most of my listening is just below a conversational level, where I can still talk over it.

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If it is "rated" for two ohms you will be fine. Since it is rated at two ohm it is designed for the heat. If you really will not be listening that loud you may consider looking at the distortion rate at each of those rated levels. One has to remember that when power doubles so usually does distortion. This is how people "blow" subs and amps. The speaker can only reproduce the signal that is sent to it.

 

Many years ago amps were not usually stable at 2 ohm mono. If yours indeed is you will be fine and it will sound good! I did not hear mention of you sub enclosure. If it is a cheap enclosure then the extra power and excursion will only make distortion worse. It is quite possible for the system to sound better as an 8 ohm load to keep distortion at a minimum.

 

FYI

 

This is why people run DVC subs, they are a able to turn each sub into a 2 or 8 ohm speaker, Which means they can turn a pair into 1 ohm, 4 ohm or 1 ohm.

JL Audio made 3 ohm and 3 ohm DVC's poplular

 

3 - 3Ohm DVC sub would let lets you run at 2 ohms. ( of course that power is still diveded by three) It allowed people to add a 3rd sub and not overdrive or loose potential from their amp.

 

Most Good amps are rated at 2 ohm stable, meaning it is safe to run for long periods of time. High current amps are popular in competitions as some were stable down to 1/4 of an ohm. This let people wire multiple subs in parallel and still be considered "low wattage"

 

for instance an amp that is 50w at 4 ohms is ~100w at 2 ohms and ~200w at 1 ohm, and ~400w at 1/2 ohm and ~800 w at 1/4 ohm. People could enter a 50w power class and drive an entire system! Stay within the amps rating and you will be fine. Keep the distortion low and your subs can handle WAY more power than what they are rated at.

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You will be fine.

I personally ALWAYS over powered my subs. Back in the day I turned a good deal of money selling crappy subs to people becaus they sounded good with plenty of good "clean" power. Remember the speaker can only reproduce the signal that is sent to it.

 

Keep in mind that 2/3 is about the most you should ever turn up your radio, the closer you get to the top end of a radio / amplifier / @#$$'s capability the greater the risk of damage. Also keep in mind that, that is the output at 14.4 volts. You have a 12volt battery that is being charged at around 14.4. Without a high capacity alternator or capacitors you will not be utilizing 14.4 volts, therefore your amp will not produce the rated power.

 

The combo you have will be just fine at 2 ohms, that is what it is designed to do. But it is human nature to always want more. I personally would go with more power. To handle my human nature and allow for the the overhead that is inhereatly present in the system.

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OK, cool. I will probably never go past that 2/3 mark on the volume. Its extremely rare that I will even cross the 1/2 mark, but i still want some bump when I do. And, with the 3-way Pioneer speakers I just put in all 4 doors, the sound is a little high, so I need something to add a little low end to normal listening. I understand that it may be overkill, but better to have more than you need than to wish I had some more when I need it.

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Overkill or what I would consider standard is four tweets hooked to the H.U, two amps, one to the door speakers and the other to the woofers, though they do have 6 channel amps for the likes, it's not enough juice for my standards, so that being said, two amps, both fan cooled as thats the way I will ever buy one, and a kinetic battery to finish it off. The alt and batt combo would be more than enough for the wattage. Even further would be sound dead matts and baffles. List could go on and on lol.

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Yeah, thats overkill for me.

 

 

I do have another concern. Since its been a while since I actually had to gather all these parts for an install like this, Im concerned I am missing something.

 

I have ordered a new HU, dash install kit, door chime module, amp, subs, box, amp wiring kit. Anything Im missing?

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If that amp kit doesn't have the ANL style of fuses, which you need to match up with the total value of the fuses on your amp, then I would suggest getting those. The old AGU styles suck for IMO.

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