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Reflections


prox_denali

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Hey guys,

Sort of new here but anyways, I have been taking pictures of trucks as a living at a dealership for about 2 years now. My boss put a camera in my hand and told me to take pictures of all of the inventory. "Sure, no problem, just point and shoot" I said, Boy was I wrong... The first few trucks I shot I couldn't even tell what kind of truck it was because they were that bad... But here I am today still shooting pictures so must be doing something right. I do enjoy it and have seen some major improvements in my photos in the past year or so. Going from just completely washed out, blurry, horrendous photos, to finally some that are actually presentable for a website, but I'm still not satisfied with the quality of the majority of my photos. It seems now my issue is getting rid of reflection and getting the color back on the truck.

 

post-140135-0-41007300-1443111422_thumb.jpg

 

For example, this is a truck I am currently working on, but if you look here, the color of the truck is actually green but the further down the doors to the fender you go, the less the color green of the truck - more reflection. This is starting to become common in a lot of my exterior photos from various different angles.

I use Photoshop 11 and a Canon Rebel T1i with a Canon EFS 18-55 mm lense for exterior shots (no flash) and a Sigma 10-20mm Wide Angle lense for the interior (with the help of a camera-mounted external flash). The area I shoot in is open, basic, simple and isn't much but just the backdrop and the truck (truck obviously being the focal point). I go at all different times of the day which gives me different results but the reflections seen in the paint is all too common no matter what time I go.

I would post more pictures but the forum won't let me so if you want to see more, go to www.goldenmotorsonline.com.

I know I won't be able to get rid of the reflections, nor should I but I know there has to be a way to reduce this effect. Either through photoshop, or behind the camera, Any suggestions/feedback would be awesome!

post-140135-0-41007300-1443111422_thumb.jpg

post-140135-0-41007300-1443111422_thumb.jpg

post-140135-0-41007300-1443111422_thumb.jpg

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I don't know if this would be feasible for you, but the ultimate would be to have a room with a white backdrop all around the truck, that way only the true color of the truck is coming out. Don't use flash, use a constant light source (indirect to your vehicle) and that way you will avoid any high points too, just a constant color down the side of it.

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Seriously though, I also am an automotive photographer (hobbyist) and have learned how to position the lighting within a studio or even within parking garages for that matter.

The reflection can be controlled inside & outside. It all depends on your surroundings and the angle of the subject. If inside, you really do have complete control. The best time I have found in taking some pictures is waiting til dusk. Limited time, but the effects are great. I'll post some pics of what I'm talking about in a little while.

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Seriously though, I also am an automotive photographer (hobbyist) and have learned how to position the lighting within a studio or even within parking garages for that matter.

The reflection can be controlled inside & outside. It all depends on your surroundings and the angle of the subject. If inside, you really do have complete control. The best time I have found in taking some pictures is waiting til dusk. Limited time, but the effects are great. I'll post some pics of what I'm talking about in a little while.

Absolutely...that's what we call the golden hour...an hour after sunrise of an hour before sunset. I try to schedule most of my outdoor portrait sessions during this time. :thumbs:

 

If you want to reduce reflections on metal, simply use a circular polarizing filter on your lens.

 

It'll drastically reduce (and sometimes even eliminate) reflections on the paint.

 

Cheers!

 

 

Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

Took the words right out of my mouth. That's one of my favorite filters. I will almost never take an automotive shot without it.

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I'm a new member and a pro photographer in boston. Here's my 2 cents.

 

Polarizing filter is a great idea. The amount of reflection that it reduces is going to depend on the angle the light is hitting the car. When its optimal it should reduce a lot of it, when the angle isnt so optimal you may get way less effect. You should def get a polarizer, the previous posts are right.

 

The main way to eliminate all of the refelction from the ground and surrounding objects is to get some black fabric. A big piece, best bet is just to get a couple of big king size sheets and stitch or pin them together. They are huge, and cheap. Put the fabric on the ground on top of the pavement that is refelcting up on the car. The truck will then refelct the black fabric instead of the pavement and the colors will show up. If you are getting a refelction from a nearby object (like in the Tahoe above) hold the fabric in a verticle orientation between the vehicle and the object in the reflection. You can get a guy to help you hold it or you can get a couple cheap light stands on ebay. As soon as you put it up you will get an idea of placement. Its usually best to get it as close to the car as possible.

 

Hope this helps. Here's my website so you know i'm not a kook. :)

 

www.ScottLanes.com

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II never did post any pics!

 

Nice site, Scott!

 

I prefer natural lighting rather than stuudio. I offer studio portrait photography, however my clients tend to be private automobile owners who want pics for their own enjoyment. I have fun with it & am always coming up with new ideas. I still have lots of ideas that I will work with once the Fall season begins.

Other than natural lighting I also like indoor"natural" lighting such as something like parking garages etc. Here are some of my pics to give an idea ......... I used to belong to a BMW club so there are several with that theme. (My BMW was the black one & I miss her!)

Some of these pisc have been edited, but the majority are natural lighting.

 

Pics:

 

IMG_2971_zps32cccb83.jpg

LAMBO1-1_zps23fe0e5e.jpg

BMW1_zps14c8e78e.jpg

Audi3_zpse0f4784d.jpg

Audi1_zps0c39ce7f.jpg

47_zps8e78258a.jpg

41_zps1d048963.jpg

IMG_2747_zps8d52b9f3.jpg

IMG_2735_zps8e804d3d.jpg

IMG_0106_zpsd4dc93b5.jpg

DSC00020-2_zpsd516811f.jpg

DSC00021-2_zps6706fd73.jpg

DSC00392-2_zps4e5396a7.jpg

DSC00382-2_zpsc9003167.jpg

DSC00396-1_zps45b0b420.jpg

DSC00411_zps2a0574e2.jpg

DSC00412_zps3de40928.jpg

DSC00419_zpscb9e780c.jpg

DSC00184-3_zps1388ba99.jpg

DSC00185-3_zps639dea87.jpg

DSC00133-2_zps099551c8.jpg

DSC00118-2_zps7c364c2a.jpg

 

Heavy edit:

DSC00195-2_zps707f6121.jpg

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Hey guys,

Sort of new here but anyways, I have been taking pictures of trucks as a living at a dealership for about 2 years now. My boss put a camera in my hand and told me to take pictures of all of the inventory. "Sure, no problem, just point and shoot" I said, Boy was I wrong... The first few trucks I shot I couldn't even tell what kind of truck it was because they were that bad... But here I am today still shooting pictures so must be doing something right. I do enjoy it and have seen some major improvements in my photos in the past year or so. Going from just completely washed out, blurry, horrendous photos, to finally some that are actually presentable for a website, but I'm still not satisfied with the quality of the majority of my photos. It seems now my issue is getting rid of reflection and getting the color back on the truck.

 

attachicon.gif7.JPG

 

For example, this is a truck I am currently working on, but if you look here, the color of the truck is actually green but the further down the doors to the fender you go, the less the color green of the truck - more reflection. This is starting to become common in a lot of my exterior photos from various different angles.

I use Photoshop 11 and a Canon Rebel T1i with a Canon EFS 18-55 mm lense for exterior shots (no flash) and a Sigma 10-20mm Wide Angle lense for the interior (with the help of a camera-mounted external flash). The area I shoot in is open, basic, simple and isn't much but just the backdrop and the truck (truck obviously being the focal point). I go at all different times of the day which gives me different results but the reflections seen in the paint is all too common no matter what time I go.

I would post more pictures but the forum won't let me so if you want to see more, go to www.goldenmotorsonline.com.

I know I won't be able to get rid of the reflections, nor should I but I know there has to be a way to reduce this effect. Either through photoshop, or behind the camera, Any suggestions/feedback would be awesome!

Do you have any more pics of your work?

If you can take pictures and someone is willing to pay you for it then yeah, I would say you're definitely doing something right!

 

Try Adobe Lightroom. I love it & rarely use anything else.

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I am finding questions fade away after a couple of thousand.

No sheets, no studios, no questions..

you find a spot, it is magic, go with it.

 

heck, not even the big price on a fancy camera remains a focus.

 

just keep taking photos..

TFTAdetail. nice shots..

I like #7 and 11 (#1 being at the top.)

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Thanks yall so much for the feedback! I was playing around with my lasso tool and paint bucket on my profile picture, still have yet to get a filter though I'll probably pick one up here soon.

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post-140135-0-85013000-1444431721_thumb.jpg

post-140135-0-85013000-1444431721_thumb.jpg

post-140135-0-85013000-1444431721_thumb.jpg

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I don't know if this would be feasible for you, but the ultimate would be to have a room with a white backdrop all around the truck, that way only the true color of the truck is coming out. Don't use flash, use a constant light source (indirect to your vehicle) and that way you will avoid any high points too, just a constant color down the side of it.

We had a photo booth that we also used as storage haha but when I did use it, I was okay with it. I loved the results on interior photos but exteriors looked half decent only because I had over head lighting and none on the sides. I tend to never use flash on exterior shots only because I'm afraid of getting hotspots or reflections off of the headlight/tail light.

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