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Not very Pleased


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I just looked at Chevrolet.com and looked at the new 2500 Suburban.

 

Needless to say, I am not pleased.

 

No big block, no diesel (Based on rumors, I knew that going in), torsion bar front suspension instead of coils and the very same wheels that have been out for about a decade now on heavy trucks/suv's. At LEAST put different wheels on!!

 

I feel like the 2500 Suburban will be abandoned very soon as they have done NOTHING for it except slap on the new body. Is GM pushing 2500 Suburban buyers into trucks to keep the productions lines flowing smoothly with 1500's? Since the platform was rushed to market, I am hoping that next year, '09 at the latest, they will take the 2500 Suburban to the next level with better front suspension, and the optional Duramax/Allison combo and for the sake of mankind, put some NEW Wheels on the d**n thing!!!! :chevy:

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Why no big block?? who's gonna buy a big block with gas prices the way they are? Ya, the truck guys might, but people who drive SUV's are different. As for a diesel, we'll have to see the prices of the trucks in '07 because of the '07 emmissions. A 2500 Burb with a very expensive motor may put you close to 60K for a Chevrolet SUV.

 

I hear ya on most of it though, even though I don't really care what they do with the SUV's.

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I believe that I heard the frame and chassis for the 2500 is the same as the last years. They just dropped the new body on it. They will be different for the next year. I think the reason was that they were still developing or testing a new frame to make sure it was stronger than the current 2500 frame.

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Seems reminecent of 1999...when they brought out the 1500 Silvy's, and the 2500's were still OBS.

 

From the looks of it, this defenitly looks like a chop-together last minute 2500.

 

I miss the old days of pickups. When you could buy one fully loaded, with a stick shift, and even have a small Diesel in a 1500. When you could totally order your own customized pickup truck. I remember my dad ordering a 1983 Chevy Custom Deluxe, jet black, shortbed, 305-V8 with a 4-speed creeper gear and a locker. The dealership ordered 3 more exactly like it. They loved it that much.

 

I guess due to streamlineing and moderization, packages are better.

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Why no big block?? who's gonna buy a big block with gas prices the way they are? Ya, the truck guys might, but people who drive SUV's are different. As for a diesel, we'll have to see the prices of the trucks in '07 because of the '07 emmissions. A 2500 Burb with a very expensive motor may put you close to 60K for a Chevrolet SUV.

 

I hear ya on most of it though, even though I don't really care what they do with the SUV's.

 

 

 

60K? if they dropped a diesel in it at least 70K and for what?

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Seems reminecent of 1999...when they brought out the 1500 Silvy's, and the 2500's were still OBS.

 

From the looks of it, this defenitly looks like a chop-together last minute 2500.

 

I miss the old days of pickups.  When you could buy one fully loaded, with a stick shift, and even have a small Diesel in a 1500.  When you could totally order your own customized pickup truck.  I remember my dad ordering a 1983 Chevy Custom Deluxe, jet black, shortbed, 305-V8 with a 4-speed creeper gear and a locker. The dealership ordered 3 more exactly like it.  They loved it that much.

 

I guess due to streamlineing and moderization, packages are better.

 

 

 

 

I don't miss the old days...Because those very trucks would be burning a quart of oil by 75k, and needed a new motor at 100....And just TRY towing a 7,000 pound boat with a '79 half ton with a small block.

 

I'll take one that lasts 250,000 miles, and will pull almost twice it's weight.

 

But that's just me. :tear:

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The "new" 2500 Suburbans are using the current frame and suspension, with the new body. GM will make the change after the new HD trucks are out next year. Go to GMinsidenews.com, it's posted over there all about the old frame being used until the HD's come out. Probably due to testing the new HD platform, plus GM probably doesn't want any manufacturer knowing what advancements GM has made with it's new HD line-up. I'd expect to see a Duramax/Ally combo in the next year or so. Unless GM is stupid enough to design a completely new vehicle without the ability to fit a diesel in it. Maybe one of GM's new smaller diesels they are working on will find it's way into GM's SUV lineup. Chris

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Call me an odd duck, but I would buy a 2500 Suburban with a big block and definately with the Duramax! I owned a 1500 Suburban with the 5.3 and the word "pooch" is not a good enough description! While it was a VERY nice ride, it was like a boat on the water and it is a heavier vehicle compared to my truck. Too smooth for my taste and I like a more "truck-like" ride. The 2500's have leafs in the rear, not coils. Also, with my 5.3, I got around 15 on the interstate and 12-13 around here. Towing much of anything barely got me 10 mpg. For the power gains, I will take 10 city and 13 highway with a better ride (to my tastes) and I would pay the extra for the diesel. Better milage, great power and good resale.

 

I understand that most buyers of what I want will just buy a truck, but I want a Suburban. I guess this is just one area where the minority really does lose out.

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Seems reminecent of 1999...when they brought out the 1500 Silvy's, and the 2500's were still OBS.

 

From the looks of it, this defenitly looks like a chop-together last minute 2500.

 

I miss the old days of pickups.  When you could buy one fully loaded, with a stick shift, and even have a small Diesel in a 1500.  When you could totally order your own customized pickup truck.  I remember my dad ordering a 1983 Chevy Custom Deluxe, jet black, shortbed, 305-V8 with a 4-speed creeper gear and a locker. The dealership ordered 3 more exactly like it.  They loved it that much.

 

I guess due to streamlineing and moderization, packages are better.

 

 

 

 

 

In my book the 99 OBS burb was the last of the good burbs with the best ones ending with 91 body style for simplicity and sturdiness. I have a 89 4x4 burb that I bough new in 89 that is still pretty cherry and I have no intention of every replacing it with a new burb. It has to service me for act least 5 otr 6 more years until kids finish colllege and I see no problem there as it has be quite truoble free though it has 176k miles on it now. (I have had more trouble with my 2000 K3500 OBS with only 37K than I have ever had with my 89 burb)

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I miss the old days of pickups.  When you could buy one fully loaded, with a stick shift, and even have a small Diesel in a 1500. 

 

 

 

 

Are you talking about the POS Olds 350 diesel?

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I don't miss the old days...Because those very trucks would be burning a quart of oil by 75k, and needed a new motor at 100....And just TRY towing a 7,000 pound boat with a '79 half ton with a small block.

 

I'll take one that lasts 250,000 miles, and will pull almost twice it's weight.

 

But that's just me. :cheers:

 

 

 

 

 

I do miss them and I had some old trucks that were real beasts. I had a 72 GMC 4x4 that I got when it was a year old and had it for 9 years and it had over 160K on it when I sold it and it "maybe used a half or quart between 3000 mile changes and it had a hard life and was towing 23K grain trailers at harvest time for many years and never failed (350 with a SAM465 granny gear 4 speed. I have a 79 J20 that started life as a farm truck hauling same trailers and then pushed snow for 15 years and it still runs 27 years later (a new style truck would have died long ago) and uses maybe a quart every 1500 to 2000 miles. My 89 4x4 burb that I bought new has 175 K and use about 1/2 qt between changes and it is 17 years old now. It has been very relaible and you will spend a fortune keep a new one running that long. New truck are more car like and more comfortable but built as cheaply as possible. Back in the 60 Gm shipped their truck with a 12 inch rockwell axle and is considered bullet proof even today. I have owned about 9 4x4's startin back in about 1970 and driven many others and they were a lot more truck then and get less truck like with each generation. My 66 had a front bumber that could take down a 2 or 3 inch tree blazing a trail in brush without a dent and on a new one a 1 inch sapling would likely rip bumber off.

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I do miss them and I had some old trucks that were real beasts. I had a 72 GMC 4x4 that I got when it was a year old and had it for 9 years and it had over 160K on it when I sold it and it "maybe used a half or quart between 3000 mile changes and it had a hard life and was towing 23K grain trailers at harvest time for many years and never failed (350 with a SAM465 granny gear 4 speed. I have a 79 J20 that started life as a farm truck hauling same trailers and then pushed snow for 15 years and it still runs 27 years later (a new style truck would have died long ago) and uses maybe a quart every 1500 to 2000 miles. My 89 4x4 burb that I bought new has 175 K and use about 1/2 qt between changes and it is 17 years old now. It has been very relaible and you will spend a fortune keep a new one running that long. New truck are more car like and more comfortable but built as cheaply as possible. Back in the 60 Gm shipped their truck with a 12 inch rockwell axle and is considered bullet proof even today. I have owned about 9 4x4's startin back in about 1970 and driven many others and they were a lot more truck then and get less truck like with each generation.  My 66 had a front bumber that could take down a 2 or 3 inch tree blazing a trail in brush without a dent and on a new one a 1 inch sapling would likely rip bumber off.

 

 

 

 

Hah! How IS Doc Brown these days anyway?

 

Because unless you're back from the future, you have no freaking clue what it will take to have current trucks running for years, and to assume you do is asinine.

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I do miss them and I had some old trucks that were real beasts. I had a 72 GMC 4x4 that I got when it was a year old and had it for 9 years and it had over 160K on it when I sold it and it "maybe used a half or quart between 3000 mile changes and it had a hard life and was towing 23K grain trailers at harvest time for many years and never failed (350 with a SAM465 granny gear 4 speed. I have a 79 J20 that started life as a farm truck hauling same trailers and then pushed snow for 15 years and it still runs 27 years later (a new style truck would have died long ago) and uses maybe a quart every 1500 to 2000 miles. My 89 4x4 burb that I bought new has 175 K and use about 1/2 qt between changes and it is 17 years old now. It has been very relaible and you will spend a fortune keep a new one running that long. New truck are more car like and more comfortable but built as cheaply as possible. Back in the 60 Gm shipped their truck with a 12 inch rockwell axle and is considered bullet proof even today. I have owned about 9 4x4's startin back in about 1970 and driven many others and they were a lot more truck then and get less truck like with each generation.  My 66 had a front bumber that could take down a 2 or 3 inch tree blazing a trail in brush without a dent and on a new one a 1 inch sapling would likely rip bumber off.

 

 

 

 

Hah! How IS Doc Brown these days anyway?

 

Because unless you're back from the future, you have no freaking clue what it will take to have current trucks running for years, and to assume you do is asinine.

 

 

 

 

 

You are the clueless one as modern trucks are made as cheaply as possible with more gadets to work for a few years and then fail sometimes while old truck have very little to go wrong with them including no computer or sensors to go bad. The more complex the clockwork, the easier it is to gum it up. Sure FI is nice but I would not want to count on GM's muilty port 10 or 15 years from now with spending a fortune on it though their TBI system was a nice compromise because it gave a simple and reliable injection system that has few moving parts and is easy to repair and has proved to be very reliable too. My neighbor has a 41 year old Chevy 1 ton stake bed that he drives daily and has had it for many years and has had no trouble with it and next you are going to te;ll me that a moderm 1 ton will do as well 41 years from now. (not that I will still be around but they are not built to last like they were years ago) New truck are biult ro be flashy with whistle and bell and then to need replacement in a timely manor when they get troublesome so you can start it all over again.

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You are the clueless one as modern trucks are made as cheaply as possible with more gadets to work for a few years and then fail sometimes while old truck have very little to go wrong with them including no computer or sensors to go bad. The more complex the clockwork, the easier it is to gum it up. Sure FI is nice  but I would not want to count on GM's muilty port 10 or 15 years from now with spending a fortune on it  though their TBI system was a nice compromise because it gave a simple and reliable injection system that has few moving parts and is easy to repair and has proved to be very reliable too. My neighbor has a 41 year old Chevy 1 ton stake bed that he drives daily and has had it for many years and has had no trouble with it and next you are going to te;ll me that a moderm 1 ton will do as well 41 years from now. (not that I will still be around but they are not built to last like they were years ago) New truck are biult ro be flashy with whistle and bell and then to need replacement in a timely manor when they get troublesome so you can start it all over again.

 

 

 

 

I wouldn't dream of telling you that a modern 1 ton will be running 41 years from now. You know why? BECAUSE THERE'S NO WAY TO TELL. Once again...HOW DO YOU KNOW? They're doing fine so far.

 

Since when does FI cost a fortune? It's pretty damn cheap, and much easier to work with than a carb or TBI...That beloved TBI of yours has a crapload more moving parts to "gum up" than a typical FI system, not to mention just as many sensors....Oh, and that 41 year old Chevy of your neighbors? I bet it gets 7 miles to the gallon and produces more hydrocarbons than the smoking yard at SingSing after a 40 day lockdown.

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Older trucks were simpler and built out of heavier materials, but how about rust? In the midwest and other snowbelt areas, rust is a HUGE issue. After 5 years, the undercarage is rusty and after 10, the body is almost gone on older trucks. Todays, fair pretty well.

 

As for lighter materials, yes, but a lighter truck will use less fuel, emit less polutants and are in reality designed to "crumple" under impact to ensure the saftey of the passengers.

 

I love older trucks, but todays trucks are pretty hard to beat. My 2000 Silverado with 100k is in a lot better shape than a '76 that I used to own with the same miles.

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