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Buying a new 5'er


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3 weeks ago I ordered a new travel trailer. This one is a 5th wheel and is the 1st fifth wheel I've owned.

 

I've been checking out other forums and can't really come to an answer as to whether I need to buy a sliding hitch for my shortbed. I don't think it would be a bad thing to have, but I'm not sure it is 100% necessary because most fifth wheel travel trailers come with what I would call an extended kingpin.

 

I know that I definatly want a hitch that has the 4-way swivel capabillities (forward/aft/left/right).

 

Any suggestions???

 

Thanks

 

Here is the floor plan I ordered... I needed the extra bunkhouse for the 3 kids.

 

model_floorplans_pic_460.jpg

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There are a lot of "depends on" with this question.

 

With the truck in my sig., I've pulled 2 different 5er's with a non-sliding hitch. Our 1st 5er was a 97 Prowler, which did not have a front cap, but just regular filon fiberglass on a flat front. It did have an extended pin box and I could back it into a near 90° angle without hitting the cab. Our current 5er is a 2004 Cedar Creek, which does have a front cap and an extended pin box. Because of the cap, I cannot back it into as sharp of an angle as I did the previous coach, but have been able to manuever it into some very tight spaces with bad angles and have never hit anything yet. The key is to take your time when backing into a space. I've seen a great many people who are bound and determined to show off at the campground by whipping right back into their spot. They tend to be the ones whose campers have dents, dings and scratches all over them. I paid too much for my coach to treat it that way, so if it takes me a few extra minutes to get it situated the way I want it safely, so be it.

 

Good luck with your new coach.

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with the new 5'ers the only one that I have seen that you dont need a slider for in order to be assured not hitting your cab in a turn is the Titanium series. Other than that, you would most likely need to talk to the dealer or checkout RV.net for better advice.

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I tow a travel trailer, but from what I've read, it depends on the model of 5er. Some folks also mount the hitch further back in the bed to avoid needing a slider.

 

Best bet would be to post specifics in the 5er forum at RV.net, you'll get some good info there.

 

BTW, looks like a niiiice trailer, good luck and happy camping!

 

Here's my 34'er on the beach:

 

BurbandTrailer.jpg

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I tow a 30' 5er with my 6'5" box and do have a slider hitch in case I need it.However, after a couple yrs of towing fifth wheels Ive never used the slide feature. It takes a pretty tight turn to need the hitch slid back, but Im sure its a nice feature when you do need it.

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I tow a 30' 5er with my 6'5" box and do have a slider hitch in case I need it.However, after a couple yrs of towing fifth wheels Ive never used the slide feature. It takes a pretty tight turn to need the hitch slid back, but Im sure its a nice feature when you do need it.

 

 

 

 

That's the general concesus that I've heard... with the newer fifth wheels, the 6.5" box is considered the standard box, and the smaller box on the crewcab 1/2 tons is considered a "shortbed".

 

Most posts I've read on rv.net say exactly what you are saying... unless you get into a jacknife situation on uneven ground, a slider is not really neccessary. I'm still going to run it past my RV dealer before I make the final decision.

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Shane I can't tell from your sig if you have a short box or not. I have a short box (6.5') with a Reese sliding fifth wheel to pull a 27' Triple E rear bunk model. I would say without knowing you model of trailer that a long box will not need a sliding fifth wheel, and while I agree with the comments above about never needing it, I would recommend a short box have the sliding fifth wheel. There are some very expensive types such as "pullrite" that you can see at most any dealer, but the much less expensive manual types like mine are all a guy should need.

I have practiced in the yard and can go very close to a full 90 degrees without the slider, but have heard just enough comments about how once in a long while it gets you out of trouble, so I went with the slider.

Husky is another name I hear out there as well.

Good luck and have fun.

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Shane I can't tell from your sig if you have a short box or not. I have a short box (6.5') with a Reese sliding fifth wheel to pull a 27' Triple E rear bunk model. I would say without knowing you model of trailer that a long box will not need a sliding fifth wheel, and while I agree with the comments above about never needing it, I would recommend a short box have the sliding fifth wheel. There are some very expensive types such as "pullrite" that you can see at most any dealer, but the much less expensive manual types like mine are all a guy should need.

I have practiced in the yard and can go very close to a full 90 degrees without the slider, but have heard just enough comments about how once in a long while it gets you out of trouble, so I went with the slider.

Husky is another name I hear out there as well.

Good luck and have fun.

 

 

 

 

 

Mines a husky and its a very stout easy to operate hitch. My buddys got a reese with the same weight rating and IMO its not nearly as beefy. I did zero research on it, the hitch was included with my trailer purchase so i took what they gave me.

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:) I've had a 8K pound 5th wheel for 2 years now and love using it. I have an 02 2500HD with the 8.1/Allison, 4X4, crew cab, with a 6 1/2 box. The hitch was included in the price and so was the installation. It's a Reese sliding hitch, 16K pound capacity and works great. I leave it permanently in the "Locked Towing" position, so for all practical purposes, it never moves, (I also have a big toolbox and the RV does not hit it at all). The only down side to these hitches is that you have to put them in and out. They come in two pieces. The base weighs 100 pounds even and you drop it into the 4 slots that the 2 bedrails provide and put 4 pins in and you are 1/2 way through. The top piece weighs 50 pounds and attaches with one giant pin to the main base. Bingo...now you are ready to go.

 

I use the bed of my truck to haul stuff all the time, so I can't possibly leave this hitch in all the time. I haul hay for a friend so I also have a Reese Gooseneck hitch, that drops in with the same 4 pins as the 5th wheel base would. It only weighs 45 pounds and is no big deal. I say all of this because......last week I used the RV up in Georgia and while walking around the park looking at everyone's setups, guess what I discover? Lots of these folks have apparently bought an adapter of sorts, that hooks up directly to their kingpin on their RV, but at the bottom, it is long and straight and looks exactly like a gooseneck hitch you would see on a horse trailer. They are now using a gooseneck hitch to haul their RVs, and apparently it works just fine. If I had this to do all over, I would get my 2 bedrails put in like normal, but just get this adapter and use the gooseneck setup. I am going to look up Reese Hitches on the Internet and see what these things cost. Just a thought if you haven't bought yet. I'll let you know what I find out.

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I have owned 3 5th wheels now, 2 Prowler's and now a Rockwood. The Rockwood has the front cap. I tow with an ext cab chevy with 6.5' box. I have never had a slider hitch and never needed one. When I bought my Rockwood the dealer pushed me hard to get the slider and I just could not understand why. I have never had a problem backing and I put this 30+' camper into some tight spots. Like many others on here . . . until I get very close to 90 degees it just isn't a problem.

 

Looks like a nice rig you bought. Have fun with it.

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Any suggestions???

 

 

 

 

 

Speaking from experience......

 

 

Get the slider. The added cost is minor, and it does more than just protect you from a 'crunch'.

 

In tight backing maneuvers, the added steering leverage by moving the pivot point off the top of the axle is priceless.

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I have the Reese 16k slider which has the 4-way pivot but have not use it in the two years towing our 5er. I bought the 5er through an wholesaler online and thought I rather buy the slider before I pick up the trailer in Ohio and better to have it and not need it than need it and not have it. The slider was about $100.- more. I also bought a mounting kit for the frame and didn't need to drill holes through the frame or weld anything to the frame: Fifth Wheel Trailer Hitch Custom Installation Brackets. The trailer has an extended pin-box and I have about 6 in. of clearance when turned close to 90°.

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Get a slider. I broke a back window because I didn't have one (and I do have an ext pin box). The popping sound was as loud as a gun going off right behind you. It was not fun getting the window replaced when away from home. It also didn't make the camping trip much fun. Hard to have fun with no back window when it decides to rain.

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