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So being that I’m in NY nobody will ship ammo to me. Ammo is scarce and if a store has it they are charging astronomical prices.

 

Sooo my wife had bought me a reloading kit a few years back. Believe it’s a lee breech lock kit. I think it’s time to dive in and set up an area in my house to start. I’ve never done it or know many who have. I watched a few YouTube videos that’s all. I have several rounds I would like to reload. I have lots of questions and don’t know where to begin. I want to reload 5.56, .300 blackout, .308, 9mm, .45, and maybe some .357. What’s the best powder for each caliber? Which website do you guys use for everything? Are there any tricks you’ve learned? You see where I’m going with this. I’m wet behind the ears and need guidance. If you have the time please point me in the right direction. Maybe we could start something fun hear. America

 

 

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Powder manufacturer sites like Hodgon has reloading data information.
You need to get some reloading books and start reading. I would get Ken Waters Pet Loads book, Lyman reloading book, Lee reloading book, and you can look at getting one or a couple of bullet manufacturers reloading books.
I know you say you got a reloading kit but there is more you will need, so you need to start getting everything together.
Its my opinion, but you should start with reloading the handgun loads before the rifle ones.
There is another problem you might run into and that's components. Brass, bullets and especially primers are more scarce these days.
Learn and be safe.

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Great info. I will definitely look into those suggestions. So my question to you is why the pistol vs rifle ammo first?


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Get this book:

 

https://www.hornady.com/reloading/handbook

 

Start with the pistol calibers, lot easier, no case trimming needed. I don’t even measure them prior to running. Just check the overall length once done. Book gives you a range to hit.

 

I use Power Pistol, CCI primers and Berrys plated bullets for 380, 9mm. 45 I use Unique. Primers are the main ****** to find right now. Cast bullets are cheaper and fine for wheel guns but I had a ton of feeding issues on my semi-autos so I stick with the plated.

 

I have a Hornady lock n load progressive to run pistol, and pretty quickly at that. Rifle hunting cartridges are done on a single station very tediously. I personally don’t bother with reloading 5.56 at this point although I have the dies to do so. The crimped primers on the milspec brass add yet another step, and it used to be cheap enough to just buy the ammo off the shelf instead of screwing around. Same could be said for 9mm but not anymore.

 

Only other advice I can offer is to be very mindful when shooting your reloads, especially at first. Squib loads are possible. Especially if the powder or primers are stored incorrectly (humidity, etc). Overcharging is another concern. Double charging is also possible however I’ve found at least with 9mm, a double charge will spill over the case and you’ll know right away. 

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Ok so I’ll start with 9mm and .45 acp since that’s what I edc. I’m looking for dies and primers but can’t find like you said. This really sucks because I’ve had this kit in my basement for two years and the dies in my cart and like an idiot I decided too late to act on it. I will definitely look into the other things mentioned. I wish there was a local class. I’m a hands on type of person. I need to take a list of all the things I need besides the kit to get going. I’d hate to start and not have everything needed. Seems like I might be at a standstill because of the times. Any websites you particularly use?


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Rifle especially for the 5.56 is just a little more time consuming especially for first time reloading. If you can just buy some 5.56 in bulk mainly for SHTF. Spend the time reloading on what you use for EDC. When it comes to bullets reload some self defense and some just for plinking. The hornady book as mentioned is good, but I would get the Lyman book also or individual bullet maker books because the Hornady book only talks about Hornady made bullets. 

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For simplicity I've been using Bullseye powder for all my pistol calibers for 10 something years.  It's not the best "beginner" powder to use, but it's what I started on, because it uses very little powder and is easy to double charge without over filling the case.  The fact that it uses less powder makes it more economical as well though.  .380, 9mm, 38spl, 357, 45acp, 44 spl, 44 mag, and .40 are what I've been using it for.  It's not good for a hot magnum load but it'll get you to the watered down factory mag loads easily. 

 

Unfortunately like you're finding out now is not a good time to get into anything gun related as everything seems to be out of stock or if in stock priced astronomically.  Reloading manuals as suggested a few times above, get a couple.  Never had a problem with using cast projectiles that were done by someone else.  My own cast projectiles work great, other than my 9mm which I need to trouble shoot still (tumble/key hole).  I haven't bought components in years so I couldn't begin to tell you where to go nowadays.  If you've got Glocks with the Glock proprietary rifling then you'll want plated projectiles, hard cast may work.  If you're using an aftermarket barrel then you're good to go. 

 

There might be local classes, check with local gun stores or reloading supply stores.  I've never heard of them but they've got to be there somewhere.  Nothing else you can search youtube or the gun alternative to youtube that I can't think of right now since youtube might actually not allow reloading videos.  I'd also invest in a chronograph, while it won't tell you if you're over pressuring, you'll be able to see if you're within projectile FPS specs while working up loads.  They're also good if you want to get into competitions where you really try to game them by getting right down to that power level floor.

 

You'll have to list what's in the kit for us to tell you what you're missing though.

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Loading for range / general purpose ammo, the Hornady book works as well as any because it has listings for the plain old FMJs in any caliber. Self defense and hunting loads are another story for sure.


I get most of my reloading stuff from Midway USA but they are wiped out like everyone. In addition to the obvious, an ultrasonic cleaner is nice to have for the used brass. A good scale and a digital caliper. Deburring tool is a must if you’re using new brass. Bullet puller for screw ups. Ammo checker gauge block. Case trimmer when you eventually move to rifle cartridges. Just some things off the top of my head. It’s a rabbit hole and gets expensive in a hurry.
 

I’m sure there’s YouTube videos to cover the basics but I’m definitely thankful to have been taught in person by an old timer.

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Just want to say how much I appreciate all the help. You guys rock! I grew up in inner city thinking guns where illegal. I know, embarrassing. I moved an hour north of the city and boy did that open my eyes. Got my pistol permit, got into fishing and hunting. The life, bigger picture.

 

There are soo many different ways to skin a cat when it comes to reloading. This is what confuses me. Everyone has their preference so I guess I’ll have to find mine eventually. Having a good foundation (your help) is definitely a good start. I’m at work now but when I get home tomorrow I’ll take a look at what’s in the kit. I’m pretty sure it’s the lee breech lock kit. That’s all that I have for now. Trying to compile that list

 

 

Btw love the passion you guys have for this

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Don't worry. It can't possibly get out of control and take up lots of room.... Not pictured is my actual reloading bench (it's a mess), the stash of wheel weight ingots I made nor the 2-3k lbs of wheel weights on the side of the house waiting to be melted down.  😄20201107_004831.jpg20201107_004526.jpg20201107_004512.jpg20201107_004500.jpg

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Edited by Chevyguy85
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Outstanding!!!!!!

 

Side note just ordered lee 4 die set 45acp and digital caliper. Maybe one day I’ll be at that level

 

 

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I don't even do rifle yet 😛  It is fun to say I have a 6ft section of a bowling alley lane as a reloading/work bench though 😄

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I was watching this video on YouTube. Seems pretty good to me. Whatcha think?




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When one states that handgun cartridges need not be trimmed is incorrect. Any rimless case in an auto pistol uses the case length for headspace. This includes .45 acp, 9mm, .380 ect. Also when loading straight wall cartridges  such as .38 .357 .45 colt ect. most of which are used in a revolver they should be crimped so as not to get any bullet movement in cartridges in cylinder, case length is critical in obtaining proper crimp. I guess it all depends on how much time one wants to spend on making a quality reload. While most cartridges will reload and shoot without trimming there are several things that can be affected including accuracy, reliable operation and safety.

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