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Transmission Fluid Change


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If you use one of those oil change places, they do not change the fluid. They disconnect your lines from the cooler and hook them up to a flush machine, once they start the truck, the pump in your tranny pumps the fluid out into the maching whic pushes the new fluid in. They do this until the fluid is clean. They do not change the filter. As for fluid, I would use Syn. You can never go wrong with syn!

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You trust those lube places to screw with your transmission??? I wouldn't let them change my oil. I personally know people who had filters (wrong part) fall out, drain plug left loose, wrong oil put in. I think you would be a lot safer letting a dealer do it.

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Maybe you have decent places where you are,around here they are always looking for help with ads that say "no experience neccessary". I would rather pay a little more and have a guy who is certified and does the chevy trucks everyday. Just my opinion. :D

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Careful with the synthetic. A friend of mine switched to synthetic in a stock 4L60E and he immediatedly got slipping. Switched back to dino and it went away. My opinion...synthetic is great for a built tranny but I would stuck with dino and regular changes on a stock 4L60E. Just my opinion.

 

Oh yeah, and careful with those quick-lube outfits. Another friend had a motor sieze a mile from the place because they never installed an oil filter and didn't notice the oil pouring on the floor as he drove away :D After 2 weeks of denial, they finally bought him a new engine only AFTER his attorney wrote him a nasty letter.

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Maybe you have decent places where you are,around here they are always looking for help with ads that say "no experience neccessary". I would rather pay a little more and have a guy who is certified and does the chevy trucks everyday. Just my opinion. :D

 

 

 

 

Right on jhm. I couldn't agree more. Don't go to a jiffy place for this kind of procedure. Find yourself a serious transmission shop, or take it to a dealer. The flush isn't the problem; dropping the pan and replacing the filter is where it gets iffy.

 

As many of us on this forum have discovered, changing out the transmission filter is a difficult job. To completely remove the filter gasket requires using great care, OR a special GM too. When I spoke with the tech at my local dealer, he said they often just leave the old gasket in place, putting the new filter right on top of it. In other words, it can be a PITA for them, too. This is NOT a job for a pimple-faced kid, or even for his older brother.

 

gnutruk

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If you stay on top of the fluids condition IMHO theres little to no need to change the filter. In my trucks / cars I've opted to stick with Dino oil and just change the fluid more often, since I do my own "fluid exchange" at home the cost is very low. No special machine required just a couple of lengths of hose and a bucket along with a helper.

 

 

Rick

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If you stay on top of the fluids condition IMHO theres little to no need to change the filter.  In my trucks / cars I've opted to stick with Dino oil and just change the fluid more often, since I do my own "fluid exchange" at home the cost is very low. No special machine required just a couple of lengths of hose and a bucket along with a helper.

 

 

Rick

 

 

 

 

The Difference between Synthetic and the NEW DEXRON specification is very small (if any at all) The NEW DEXRON specification is DEXRON III-H (the old was DEXRON III-G)

 

some of the of the changes to III-H are longer fluid life, better sprag gear wear, less shuttering, better seal life.

 

from what I have been reading, it is reported for DEXRON manufactures to meet GM's III-H specifications most are having to use some Syntehtic base stocks.

 

The DEXRON III-H spec's went into effect in JAN 05 so we should see this on the shelves now.

 

D.I.Y and you can make sure it was done correct.

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Here is one way to D.I.Y.

 

1. Make sure the fluid is warm. Warm up the car so the transmission is at normal operating temperature. Pull the transmission dipstick (located near the firewall in most cars). Fresh fluid is translucent and cherry red. Some darkening is normal, but if it is reddish brown or mustard color and smells like burnt varnish, it is worn out.

2. Drain the fluid by loosening the pan. Select the correct Hastings filter replacement based on pan shape and prepare a large pan to catch the fluid. Then loosen each pan bolt a turn or two and loosen one corner more than rest. Drain mostly from this corner.

3. Finish removing the pan and any gasket material from the pan or case. Avoid scratching the metal and make sure the pans gasket surface isnt bent or distorted.

4. Remove the old filter. Most transmission filters are held in place with a bolt or two, but some are held by a clip. Be careful to include O-Rings or other seals.

5. Install a new filter. Use the clips or bolts from the old filter. Be sure O-Rings, etc. are in place. If the filter has a long intake neck, gently push the neck into place without unseating the O-Ring.

6. Clean the pan thoroughly. Inspect the pan before cleaning. A small amount of fine grey clutch dust is normal. However, if you find metal shavings, there has been transmission damage. Clean the pan with solvent and wipe dry so there is no harmful residue.

7. Position gasket on pan. Some gaskets have four holes slightly smaller than the rest to allow four bolts through the pan and through these smaller holes to hold the gasket in place.

8. Hand tighten pan bolts in a criss-cross pattern. After that, use a torque wrench to tighten bolts to proper ft-lbs as per manufacturer.

9. Refill the transmission using only the amount shown as refill capacity in the owners manual or "AMSOIL Product Selection Guide, using the type of fluid specified for the vehicle.

10. If doing only a partial fluid replacement, skip to instruction 12 below. If doing a complete fluid replacement, follow the steps in instruction 11.

11. You now have replaced the fluid in the pan. To replace the fluid in the torque converter and oil cooler also, follow these steps.

 

Step 1. Obtain the total system capacity of the vehicle from the manufacturer or AMSOIL. Have this amount readily available.

 

Step 2. Disconnect the oil cooler line from the oil cooler. As you may not know which is the pressure side and which is the return side, have both directed so the stream of fluid will be directed toward a receptacle.

 

Step 3. With another person, be prepared to add ATF to the fill area as it is being pumped out of the oil cooler line.

 

Step 4. Start the engine, and as the old fluid is pumped out, add fresh fluid to the pan.

 

Step 5. When either the fluid color brightens or the total capacity has been replaced, shut the engine off and re-attach the oil cooler line. All fluids has now been changed.

12. Recheck the fluid level. With the car on level ground, set the parking brake and the transmission in Park or Neutral. Let the engine idle for a few minutes. Shift the transmission into different positions before returning the lever to Park or Neutral. Check the fluid level again and check for leaks.

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As stated above............works perfect and costs very little. Only thing to ad would be,

1) only run the engine at idle / never rev it up

2) when the fluid flow start to spit or slow down shut the engine off and top the fluid up then fire it back up (safer not reaching over a running engine).

 

Rick

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  • 3 years later...

Is there a way to drain the fluid directly from the torque convertor, i.e. a bolt or something? On my merc, I turn the crankshaft bolt on the engine till the bolt on the torque convertor comes in view (access hole in bell housing). Then you can drain it directly from the convertor. Was wondering if there was a similar setup on this. By searching it doesnt appear to be.

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Is there a way to drain the fluid directly from the torque convertor, i.e. a bolt or something? On my merc, I turn the crankshaft bolt on the engine till the bolt on the torque convertor comes in view (access hole in bell housing). Then you can drain it directly from the convertor. Was wondering if there was a similar setup on this. By searching it doesnt appear to be.

 

 

There is no drain on the converter on our trucks, at least the new ones from 2000 up that I know of.

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Is there a way to drain the fluid directly from the torque convertor, i.e. a bolt or something? On my merc, I turn the crankshaft bolt on the engine till the bolt on the torque convertor comes in view (access hole in bell housing). Then you can drain it directly from the convertor. Was wondering if there was a similar setup on this. By searching it doesnt appear to be.

 

 

There is no drain on the converter on our trucks, at least the new ones from 2000 up that I know of.

 

 

 

I was under my 06 last night and I noted a few interesting things:

 

1. No drain on transmission pan

 

2. two access plugs on the bell housing, most likely for convertor drain

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