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Ron Myers

5th Wheel Towing Capacity seems really low on some 2500's

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I have been doing a lot of research on towing capacity of the GM 3/4 ton trucks between 2015 and 2019. Can someone explain why the 5th Wheel Towing capacity on a CrewCab, 4WD, StdBox is 1900 lbs less than the same truck with a 2WD? I would normally expect that difference to be about 200-300 lbs between the 2WD and 4WD drive variants. In general when looking at the capacity chart for 5th towing on a 2500, the capacity ranges seem to vary widely. In fact on what I would expect to be the most popular configuration, a 2500 CrewCab, with Duramax, and Std. Bed, is only rated at 13,400. This just seem really low to me for a 3/4 ton pickup.  What am I missing?

 

Thanks in advance

Ron

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It's probably just an licensing limit .  Vehicles with a lower rating will have lower tax/licensing fee's to pay in some juridictions.  If you need more, you get a 3500, and you pay the higher fee's.

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I'd think the weight difference between the trucks is more of a factor than 2-300lbs. Not just the 4wd components but the extra 1/2 cab and rear seat etc.
In addition to the comment above about licensing.

Sent from the demons in my head

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The truck is rated as a 10k LB truck. Subtract it’s wet weight and you have the payload capacity.


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1 hour ago, dplarson said:

I'd think the weight difference between the trucks is more of a factor than 2-300lbs. Not just the 4wd components but the extra 1/2 cab and rear seat etc.
In addition to the comment above about licensing.

Sent from the demons in my head
 

To be clear, its the same truck configuration. Both CrewCabs, both diesels, and both 3.73 rear gearing. The only difference is 4WD vs 2WD.

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2 hours ago, davester said:

It's probably just an licensing limit .  Vehicles with a lower rating will have lower tax/licensing fee's to pay in some juridictions.  If you need more, you get a 3500, and you pay the higher fee's.

I can't imagine licensing fees would impact official towing capacities? Fees vary from state to state. Towing capacity must be measured objectively using power, weight, braking, and physics.... But perhaps you are on to something, I am going to look at Ford and Dodge to see if they have similar disparities of towing capacities on their 3/4 ton trucks.

Edited by Ron Myers

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It was my understanding that, at least in the past, 2500's generally had a gvwr just under 10k lbs, and 3500's went over that, but both the 2500's and 3500's shared mostly the same parts.

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I have a '19 25000 Duramax and after extensive research on this subject during the past two weeks, I found that there are only 3 differences between a 2500 and 3500SRW. 1) 3500 has 18" tires rated at 3590 lbs. The 2500 has 17" tires rated at 3195 lbs. 2) 3500 has 18" wheels and 3) the 3500 has  helper springs. In a "diesel" configuration, the 2500 & 3500 srw share the same exact motor, transmission, differential, chassis frame and main spring pack. In a gas configuration the 2500 has a differential without the additional gussets welded to the pumpkin. The gas 3500 has the same diff as the diesel 2500 & 3500 trucks with the welded gussets. Anyone know if a 2500 with all those upgrades can be recertified by the NHTSA? Thanks.

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I have a '19 25000 Duramax and after extensive research on this subject during the past two weeks, I found that there are only 3 differences between a 2500 and 3500SRW. 1) 3500 has 18" tires rated at 3590 lbs. The 2500 has 17" tires rated at 3195 lbs. 2) 3500 has 18" wheels and 3) the 3500 has  helper springs. In a "diesel" configuration, the 2500 & 3500 srw share the same exact motor, transmission, differential, chassis frame and main spring pack. In a gas configuration the 2500 has a differential without the additional gussets welded to the pumpkin. The gas 3500 has the same diff as the diesel 2500 & 3500 trucks with the welded gussets. Anyone know if a 2500 with all those upgrades can be recertified by the NHTSA? Thanks.

Front sway bar has a higher spring rate. I’ll try to find the part numbers. I doubt it’s considered for the GVWR.. great write up.


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