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New Lumber For Utility Trailer ?


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I will be replacing my 6.5x16 ta utility trailer deck in the near future and have a question! Is there any concern of the trailer "disintgrating" over time with the treating process now used for wood like when using improper nails/screws????

 

Or do I go with "standard" lumber and treat the heck out of it every so often? I have read about using old oil to treat the wood. Any feed back on this as well?

 

TY!

Chris

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I would you use treated lumber. I just bought a new 6x10 utility trailer and it came with treated lumber. I would just make sure the paint is in good shape underneath. While the deck is off would be a great time to hit the frame with some rustoleum, thats what i did when i had to replace the deck on my old 4 x 8 trailer.

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I can't complain about the factory 2x lasting since '05, but plan on going with treated. The wood is held in place by the steel being welded down, but I plan on bolting (w/ galvanized botls) a 2" step bumper reciever hitch to the front of the trailer for a removable winch setup, while also holding the lumber down.

 

I also plan on beefing up the trailer a little more. It is the typical angle iron trailer, and plan on adding some additional steel cross members.

 

TY again!

Chris

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I just built a new treated deck and ran into some useful info when planning for it. There are now at least 2 major versions of treatment processes. The green-blue stuff at has been used for the past 10 or so years is known as ACQ and there is a newer formulation that looks much closer to non-treated lumber and is known as MCA. The newer formulation is much less corrosive to fasteners. Around here my local Lowes carries ACQ and the Home Depot carries MCA, and you can call around to your other local yards. Either way I'd also advise sealing the wood with an oil based semi transparent stain to seal it after the wood has been installed and dried for a couple months.

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Brantjs,

 

TY for the update on the treated wood process! I wasn't aware of that!

 

I will have to look to see what type of treated wood my local Lowes/ Hd/ Menards has.

 

As for the trailer frame, I was at Family Farm & Home today and I found a can of "Galvanized" spray paint???? From what I read on the can, it is a way to galvanize the metal. Anyone familiar with this? Or just paint the heck out of it as suggested with some Rustoleum?

 

Also, any thoughts on using old motor oil on the wood once the wood has dried from being treated?

 

TY!

Chris

 

Also on sealing the wood someway, I plan on installing the wood "upside down" (against the grain) to start, then after I seal/treat the wood will flip it over & seal what will be the true "top".

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It's definitely ACQ. Check out this article for the differences (explains far better than me): http://www.deckmagazine.com/wood/the-new-preservatives.aspx

 

I wouldn't bother with the galvanized paint. Any old rustoleum or other outside paint will be fine, you just don't want the lumber against bare metal. Galvanic protecton is more for dissimilar metals than for chemical incompatibilities. Even then I really don't think you'd end up seeing the chemicals from the lumber causing a significant corrosion attack on the metal. You see more issues with smaller fasteners like screws and small diameter lag bolts than larger through bolts or bar stock. If you aren't in a rush you would be better off with just letting the lumber dry thoroughly outside (not stacked) for a couple months and sealing both sides before installing instead of going through that twice. Or just go ahead and install and treat just the top side in a couple months or so as that is what takes the weather beating from standing water and sun. I didn't look real close at stains at the box stores since they do 30-40% off sales at sherwin Williams frequently (bringing the cost lower than the box stores for a better product).

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I used normal 4'x8' sheet of plywood & coated that (both sides) and the trailer with a rubberized bed armour coating.

Have only had in on about a year but seems to be holding up well.

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  • 5 weeks later...

Old motor oil will eventually soak thru the wood and if the wood gets soaked from rain, the oil will seep out onto the ground.

 

Whichever type of sealed wood you go with, I would use one of the truck bed coatings on the bottom side of the wood and the trailer frame. If you can clean up the metal frame, apply a metal primer then a coat of paint. When that dries, give it a light sanding so the truck bed coating will stick. You can get the one gallon coating stuff at parts stores (Hercules) that brushes on. I would remove the wiring for the lights and re-install it afterwards. You can use galvanized bolts and nuts to attach the new wood.

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  • 2 weeks later...

If it is a spring project, try looking into forming plywood with the waxed paper on it....

Only concrete form plywood from commercial job sites is what we use for everything up here.

Do not have to do anything to the plywood. Lasts the life of the trailer and is usually 3/4 inch thick.

Just a thought

Scooby

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