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57 minutes ago, Ferrari Eater said:

Completely stock, can you daily drive a 3100? If not, what modifications are necessary to make it drivable?

Absolutely. I ride an Royal Enfield that is 70 years old without issue. I just don't ride it like it's today technology. Mindful of longer braking distances and such. I certainly don't ask it to do 70 mph so I stay off the interstate. Big deal. You're in control, not the technology. If you wanted disc brakes and power steering why would you buy it to begin with unless 'resto-rod' is your thing. But ability wise. Sure and if you don't want to, let me know. I'll take it off your hands. 

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52 minutes ago, Ferrari Eater said:

Thanks, but I don't actually have one. Just wondering.

I had, up to a few years ago, a collection of motorcycles. Three of which were antiques. I've ridden everything from a Honda step through Campus 50 to a Hurricane. Sport. Touring. Roadsters. Trials. Purpose built Drag bikes. Bonneville lake bike. Last two both gas and fuel. One to six cylinder. Nothing makes me smile more than a 40's to 60's Britt half liter single roadster on a wooded back lane doing 50 mph. That Enfield had a 5 gallon tank and got 92 mpg at 60 mph. All day between fuel stops. That was good because a fuel stop was at minimum an hour long. Everyone wanted to talk about the bike. EVERYONE. :crackup:

 

We've been looking for some years for the 'right' 28/29 Model A Tudor to tour in across the USA. There are actually clubs for this sort of adventure. A 53 3100 216 babbitt beater would feel like a light year jump in tech over the A.   

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  • 1 year later...

Why not? Depending on how fast you want to go, definitely doable. I think Chevy 3100 was the naming prior to the c/k line, so maybe not the right forum? Either way, these trucks were not built for speed. My 63 tops out at about 55mph, but I also have the original 230, 3-speed column, and original rear end. If you want speed, you would need more gears. Also, they have tons of suspension upgrades for these old trucks. 

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  • 1 year later...
  • 3 months later...
On 1/2/2024 at 11:42 AM, carefulcarl said:

I was concerned about todays gas.  

 

On 1/2/2024 at 12:03 PM, carefulcarl said:

I am concerned about putting in a 1953 chevy 3100

 

 

 

Find non-ethanol if you can which is typically 90 or higher octane, and if the engine hasn't had valve seats done, run a lead substitute.  Here's one that's a good product, Amsoil Dominator octane boost -  What is a Lead Substitute (and Do I Need One)? - AMSOIL Blog

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From AMSOIL:

Lead also protected against valve recession

Lead also emerged as an effective way to protect against valve-seat recession, which can occur under high-rpm, high-heat, high-load conditions.

 

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So, avoid high rpm, high load conditions. I was driving then. Hard seats were a good idea for a pickup towing heavy, a school bus or a gasser dump truck but grandmothers and work a day people would never see the benefit. 

 

Change the sensitive parts to something not sensitive. Modern rubber fuel lines replace older materials. If you fuel tank is aluminum or steel, no issues. I doubt it has a fiberglass tank. Soldered floats will fail with time. Carry a spare or use a modern injection system like a Holley Sniper. Upgrade diaphragm fuel pumps. You get the idea.  

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I always until recently had very old vehicles I drove on weekends. Wait a minute I still do. My avalanche is over 20 years old and my wife’s toy is too. My last 5 years working I drove my 65 Chevy step side. It was actually a retro ride. And my 64 elcamino weather permitting. Rainy days I drove my 98 two door Tahoe. Later my 92 Chevy. I prefer driving older vehicles. Older vehicles you have to be mindful of brake limitations. There’re fixes for that. My 65 step side was completely modernized. 

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