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Replace rotors when replace pads?


03GMCYukon

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I am the orig owner of a '03 Yukon 2WD SLT that has 97K miles. Brake pads are original but they are 5mm front, 6mm rear at this point. I live in AZ and my son is taking the Yukon to college in NY so I'm doing some maintenance to hopefully give him a worry free vehicle.

 

My question is should I go ahead and have the rotors replaced or just have the pads replaced?

 

Also, I'll probably have the brake fluid changed (don't know why but that seems to be what people recommend). Any other items for this vehicle to watch out for? (All factory recommended maintenance completed on time and leaks always fixed as they happen, like water pump, PS pump, oil through camshaft position sensor, intake manifold, windshield washer tank)

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You sure got that right! My 900 has 56,000 miles and has already had 5 brake jobs - 4 under warranty, and one myself. Wasn't right when it left the factory, apparently.

 

Only good part is not having to deal with those stupid mini-drum parking brakes anymore. Glad they went back to true drum. Now, if they could only build rotors that don't warp every 10k, we'll be alright.

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I concur on long life. I had over 100000 miles on my 05 before I did any real brake work. What happened in my case was the $hitty rotors GM uses rotted away..... literally. They wouldn't have been worn out by any stretch but I have never seen brake rotors rust like that. We get lots of actual winter, salt and all that but still........ my truck isn't rotting apart....... just the rotors were lol. And since my rotors were a rust castrophe it was eating my front pads in an odd fashion. Prior to that I had just done pins and bushings front and rear because I can't stand the clunking when they get loose.

 

I went with better quality rotors that are coated and seem to be standing up quite nicely thus far.

 

Changing brake fluid is a good idea. Guaranteed yours will be a black tar coming out if never done. It absorbs moisture over time and the constant heat cycling breaks it down. A brake fluid change alone has generally given me a firmer pedal feel on almost every vehicle I have ever owned.

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Don't have to replace the rotors. While u have them off take the to an auto parts store and they will turn them for you pretty cheap

 

Sent from my SGH-I927 using Tapatalk 2

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I agree with the above. He's going to be using the brakes MUCH more than he did in AZ - NY is another world. Your call as to whether or not to turn them or replace. As long as they're thick enough, turning is fine. Brakes and shocks up here have about a 30k max lifespan .. maybe a little longer if he drives slow.

 

Better throw a layer of used motor oil on the undercarraige if he's going to be up here through next winter (and plans on keeping the truck more than a couple years). NY is alot like MA (not just politically ...) in that they use HUGE amounts of road salt. Back in the day people used to buy snow tires, and load their trucks or trunks with sand bags or firewood .... but the days of personal responsibility have gone by the wayside in favor of COMPLETELY BARE roads in every snowfall, no matter how light.

 

On that note, tell him to stay out of the carwashes in the winter. Wash it by hand on warmer days ONLY. Since everyone's gone bat- **** crazy over the "green" thing in the northeast, they recycle all that water used to wash the salt off everyone else's vehicles. So while the truck will look nice and clean, you just gave it a double dose of seawater - only worse.

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Brake rotors have a min thickness number, as well as a machine to number. To do it by the book, you check the lateral runout on the rotor, measure the depth of any scores, measure the thickness, then take the runout number (if scoring depth is higher than runout, use the score depth) and subtract it from the current thickness. Compare that number to the machine to spec for the rotor. The machine to number is there to allow you sufficient thickness of rotor so it does not end up below discard thickness within the normal life of the brakes.

 

Or, if rotors are original and have 97k on them, replace them.

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from GM school

 

"brake rotor machining (or replacing in your case) should not be concidered when doing routine brake maintenance"

 

in other words ,there has to be measuring of rotor thickness or pulsation of brake pedal to even think about rotors

 

hope that helps

 

my 2 cents



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IMO, you already got your moneys worth out of that combo. Rather than prolonging the inevitable, get new rotors and pads for him and call it a day. This way, the next time he needs pads, he can get the new ones turned. Odds are, the first time he has to get them done in NY the old rotors would be shot..

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Awesome info - I didn't think about the hills, etc putting more use on the brakes. For no other reason than to help me sleep better at night, I'll replace the rotors as well.

 

One post mentioned about motor oil on the undercarriage. Do you use something like a pump bug sprayer to apply the oil and how often do you do this (once a week?)

 

Thanks for the help.



Also, I only use replacement GM parts bought at the GM dealer. I just don't have extra time to spend on figuring out better deals. I may even have the dealership do the job although my local dealership doesn't have a great track record (put a dent in my 1 mo old Acadia, used grease in the interior to fix a squeek, etc)

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I use a cheap Sears pneumatic paint sprayer that came free with my air compressor 13 years ago. Just got to remember to turn the line pressure down to 50 ... lol.

 

I usually just to one thick heavy coat in the beginning of the season, but I don't drive very much. Usually a couple to 4 storms will wash most of it off, requiring re-application.

 

It's not for the faint of heart - it's very messy, it stinks like hell, and you'll leave a smoke trail a mile wide if you get any on the catalytic converters (try to avoid that - they get hot enough to start a fire) ... but nothing keeps rust away better.

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Awesome info - I didn't think about the hills, etc putting more use on the brakes. For no other reason than to help me sleep better at night, I'll replace the rotors as well.

 

One post mentioned about motor oil on the undercarriage. Do you use something like a pump bug sprayer to apply the oil and how often do you do this (once a week?)

 

Thanks for the help.

 

 

Also, I only use replacement GM parts bought at the GM dealer. I just don't have extra time to spend on figuring out better deals. I may even have the dealership do the job although my local dealership doesn't have a great track record (put a dent in my 1 mo old Acadia, used grease in the interior to fix a squeek, etc)

 

I would not use motor oil for that. Too many suspension bushings that contain rubber to worry about. For the cost, just get it sprayed with RustCheck, or Krown or any other of the nationally advertised places that use the liquid spray. The large companies that do this undercoating have tested their product on all the materials under your truck, and will warranty for damage their product causes. They also do inside panels.

Only drawback is the first time you wash your truck by hand will ruin any wash mitt you use.

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To close the thread, I went to the dealer and the service advisor said I was wasting my money by wanting the change the pads. The advisor said GM in early 2000 designed the pads to last ~140K miles. Based on pad remaining of 7mm to the warning clip and 9mm to the metal, I guess he is probably right given I have ~95K miles. This Yukon is built like a tank. I'm impressed.

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To last 140k miles?? Sounds to me like someone was trying to be funny and put a 1 in front of his 40k miles life in service manual.

I've got 2 2004 GMT-800 that have 110k and 126k still on original pads. And I tow with both......

 

All the 800's at work get long mileage out of their pads. Now the 900 series are different. Pads have worn out and rotors give is trouble

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