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Bison Bumper CAD Drawings And Design Tidbits

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Bison bumper cad 1.jpg

John Goreham
Contributing Writer, GM-Trucks.com
12-6-2018

 

These images were recently posted to the Colorado ZR2 club on Facebook by member Matt Feldermann. Matt is an employee at American Expedition Vehicles , GM's partner on the Bison trim of the Colorado ZR2. As you know if you follow the truck, the Bison comes with a bad-ass front bumper. One of the key features of which is to enable a front winch to be mounted. Matt's post helped explain one thing we have always wondered about off-road trucks. Why so few come with a winch option or even a winch mounting point. "Cooling was the #1 concern shared by GM when installing a winch," says Matt. "The positioning of a winch in the AEV Bison bumper is OE validated to have NO effect on cooling whatsoever."

bison bumper cad 2.jpg

Matt also shared that, "You can see a bracket welded to the tube that holds the winch. It’s a bit unorthodox, but that’s what had to happen to fit a winch on while maximizing approach angles."

bison cad 3.jpg

Our thanks to Matt for sharing his images.  

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Cool.  I was curious how that tube extended beyond what you can see on the exterior. 

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