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GP Phillips

Popping sound while turning left

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My 2014 Sierra Denali 4x4 has an annoying popping sound when turning to the left. I took it to the dealer and after lubing the front end it stopped (for about a week). I took it back to the dealer and they said the can’t find anything wrong. It started doing it at about 45 thousand miles and is really getting to me. Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Knowing GM, I would not be surprised if they advise you to adjust your driving to only go straight or turn right.

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What did they lube? If the lube stopped the issue, even temporarily, then those parts are a good place to looking for the problem.

There are a lot of possibilities. Ball joints, tie rods, CV shafts and steering rack to name a few. If you’re lifted or leveled, give a good hard look at your steering rack by unclamping the boots and sliding them out of the way then turning from side to side. There’s plenty of threads on the net about rack failures.

Other possibilities include loose front suspension bolts, worn sway bar bushings and links and even leaf springs have been identified as causing a popping noise while turning. Good luck.


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Sounds like cv/ball joint or front coils.


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Is the truck in 2WD, AUTO, or 4WD when this happens?

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On 8/15/2019 at 7:32 PM, GP Phillips said:

My 2014 Sierra Denali 4x4 has an annoying popping sound when turning to the left. I took it to the dealer and after lubing the front end it stopped (for about a week). I took it back to the dealer and they said the can’t find anything wrong. It started doing it at about 45 thousand miles and is really getting to me. Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated.

 

 

 

 

 

 

i am a tech for a gmc dealership. if you have noise in the front end while turning,there is a bulletin regarding this. it is to re-torque the lower control bolts and cross member bolts. would be covered under bumper to bumper if out of bumper to bumper typically 1 hr labor would be the charge no parts. 

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Thank you so much!

Is there any chance I could get a copy of this bulletin?

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15 hours ago, GP Phillips said:

Thank you so much!

Is there any chance I could get a copy of this bulletin?

thats the thing there is no bulletin, its not in service information. some of the techs at my dealership went to what they called a "sharp shooter" meeting with engineers from gm. this is what came from the meeting. why gm has not this into a bulletin i have zero clue. 

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3 hours ago, GP Phillips said:

Thanks for your help Jay.

im sorry i responded to you with the wrong message 

 

PIT5533B: Creak Click Pop Crack Type Noise From Front Suspension/Frame Area While Making Turns - (Jun 12, 2018)

 

 

Condition

Some owners may comment of a creak, click, pop, crack type noise from the front suspension or front frame area while making tight turns.  It may also be noted the noise can be felt in the foot well area. 

Cause

It has been found that this type of noise could be caused by either insufficient torque of the front suspension:

  • Frame crossmember
  • Lower control arm bolts

 

Correction 1

To correct this concern loosen and then re-torque the four front frame crossmember bolts/nuts:

  1. First Pass: 70 Nm (52 lb ft)
  2. Final Pass: 110 degrees 

 Correction 2

To correct this concern loosen and then re-torque the four front lower control arm mounting bolts/nuts:

Tighten 175 Nm (129 lb ft)

Important: If the front lower control arms nuts and washers are removed, be aware the washers are directional washers and MUST be installed in the same direction as they were removed.

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Posted (edited)

15-NA-082: Clunking Noise from Front of Vehicle During Turns and/or Bumps 

 

Chevrolet

Silverado 1500, Suburban 1500, Tahoe

2007

2018

 

All

All

GMC

Sierra 1500, Yukon, Yukon XL 1500

2007

2018

 

All

All

Condition

Some customers may comment on a clunking noise originating from the front of the vehicle that is more predominant during turns or traveling over bumps.

Cause


Object ID: 4223055Click here for detailed picture of the image.

This may be caused by a damaged stabilizer shaft frame bracket. There have been some cases in which the bracket is cracked, as shown. This condition has been found to be the result of insufficient welds between the bracket and frame rail. There have been some cases on older vehicles of corrosion affecting the bracket.

Correction

If you encounter a vehicle with the above concern, follow the procedure below to install a new stabilizer shaft bracket to the frame.






 
  1. Disconnect the negative battery cable. Refer to Battery Negative Cable Disconnection and Connection.
  2. Raise the vehicle in the air and inspect the stabilizer shaft frame brackets (both left and right) for any abnormalities or cracks and inspect welds to ensure good alignment and integrity. Refer to Lifting and Jacking the Vehicle in SI.

    Note: Be sure to inspect frame rails for any cracks or damage in relation to the stabilizer bracket. If the frame rail itself is cracked or damaged, repair should not be attempted.

  3. Once verified that the bracket is damaged or the welds are insufficient, remove the stabilizer shaft. Refer to Stabilizer Shaft Replacement in SI.
  4. On 4WD models, once the stabilizer shaft is removed also remove the front frame/front axle mount exhaust heat shield (1) located above the stabilizer bracket.
  5. With the stabilizer shaft and shield removed, using a rag and wax/grease removing solvent, remove the wax coating and any grease, oil, or undercoating from the truck frame in the affected repair area.

    Important: Be sure to remove all wax coating around the areas of the bracket. If the wax coating is not fully removed, this could affect the weld quality when installing the new bracket.

  6. After all the wax coating is removed, using a cut off wheel, remove the old bracket from the frame.

    Warning: To avoid personal injury when exposed to welding flashes or to galvanized (Zinc Oxide) metal toxic fumes while grinding/cutting on any type of metal or sheet molded compound, you must work in a properly ventilated area, wearing an approved respirator, eye protection , earplugs, welding gloves, and protective clothing.

    Important: Be sure to not cut the frame in process of removing the bracket.

  7. After the bracket has been removed, using an angle grinder with 24 grit sand paper or equivalent clean the areas of any excess bracket weld material from the frame so that the new bracket can sit flush in the location of the old one.

    Important: Be sure to not grind away any frame material, only remove the weld material.

  8. Clean the area of all debris in preparation of the new bracket to be welded to the frame.

    Important: Be sure to inspect frame rails for any cracks or damage in relation to the stabilizer bracket. If the frame rail itself is cracked or damaged, repair should not be attempted.

  9. After the area is clean of all debris, place the new bracket in the location of the removed one. The bracket should seat against the frame crossmember bracket in the most forward position, along the lower surface of the frame rail, and along the inner surface of the frame rail in the rear.

    Note: The new bracket will need the welding locations stripped of all coating. Be sure to grind all edges of the new bracket so that the quality of the weld will not be affected.

  10. After the bracket is in location, tack weld the bracket to the frame in all 4 corners of the bracket. This will keep the bracket from moving while welding the bracket fully to the frame.
  11. After the bracket is tack welded in the location, loosely position the stabilizer shaft to verify that the bracket is in the correct location. Refer to Stabilizer Shaft Replacement in SI.
  12. After verifying that the bracket is in the correct location, remove the stabilizer shaft. Refer to Stabilizer Shaft Replacement in SI.
  13. Continuous-weld the new bracket into position. Ensure the rear vertical weld (1) is extended approximately 15 mm above the edge of the bracket.

    Note: When welding, be sure to start from the bottom of the bracket and work your way upward.

    Note: Gas metal arc weld using ER70S-3 electrode and an Argon CO2 protective gas mixture.  Alternatively, meeting AWS 7013.

    Note: Provide a continuous weld around the bracket.  If access does not permit a continuous weld, make a 6 mm minimum overlap of adjacent welds.

    Warning: To avoid personal injury when exposed to welding flashes or to galvanized (Zinc Oxide) metal toxic fumes while grinding/cutting on any type of metal or sheet molded compound, you must work in a properly ventilated area, wearing an approved respirator, eye protection , earplugs, welding gloves, and protective clothing.

  14. After the bracket has been fully welded to the frame, using Lloyd’s Pure Prep™ Metal Surface Preparation P/N 25418 (10 fluid ounce bottle), or equivalent, saturate a towel or Scotch-Brite™ (3M) pad with the pre-diluted solution and scrub the area well, rendering a foaming of the Pure Prep.™ This will greatly improve adhesion and corrosion resistance in the repair areas.
  15. Using a water dampened clean towel, remove any residue and dry the affected area. Dry the repair area completely using an air hose to blow dry the frame and bracket.
  16. Check the repair area for phosphate treatment by wiping it to see if any corrosion residue can be picked up. Correctly treated areas will not have any residue on the surface.
  17. Apply a light flash-coat of Lloyds Kryptonite Metal Treatment P/N 36502 Life Long Rust Protection (14 ounce aerosol), or equivalent, to all bare areas of the frame where the wax coating was removed. This first coat should flash in approximately 3-5 minutes. Apply a light flash-coat to the inside of the frame rail using existing access holes, as shown. Insert the straw of the aerosol can as far as possible, and slowly work the straw back out while applying material.
  18. Apply a second coat of Lloyds Kryptonite. This can be a heavy coat; double and triple passes with this product, over a light first coat, are not a problem.
  19. We suggest top coating the Lloyds Kryptonite with Daubert Nox-Rust® P/N X-121B “One Coat Rust Preventative Coating” (aerosol), or equivalent.
  20. Reinstall the stabilizer shaft with new stabilizer shaft clamp bolts. With new stabilizer thread cutting bolts, drive the bolts to cut the new threads, then loosen the bolts two turns and then torque to 50 Y (37 lb ft). Refer to Stabilizer Shaft Replacement in SI.

    Note: The stabilizer shaft clamp bolt attachment holes on the new bracket are not threaded, the clamp bolts are thread cutting.

  21. On 4WD models, install the front frame/front axle mount exhaust heat shield.
  22. Reconnect the negative battery cable. Refer to Battery Negative Cable Disconnection and Connection.

 

84037074

Bracket – Drivetrain & Frt Susp Frm Stab (Left Hand)

84037075

Bracket – Drivetrain & Frt Susp Frm Stab (Right Hand)

 

 

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Edited by jay webb
to add content
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