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ultrascott

2020 2500 max towing

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So i just bought a 2020 2500 LTZ duramax to haul my 38 foot toyhauler. My question is what is my truck capable of pulling if i ever decided to go bigger? My door sticker is attached. I’ve seen a 2500 hauling some big campers,are they just overweight? 

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Edited by ultrascott

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18,500 lbs for either a conventional trailer or fifth wheel is your max towing. This is my first time owning a 2500 but on my 1500 I hit my payload capacity long before I hit my towing capacity.

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Can you post the sticker from your toy hauler? The number you’re going to be struggling with first would be the hitch weight taking away a lot of your payload.


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Like most said, you will likely hit GVW before RGAWR or GCW.  SAE procedure is base vehicle plus 400 lbs (passenger and cargo) plus a designated hitch weight.  Conventional trailers are at 10% tongue load and fifth wheels are at 15%.  You keep raising trailer weights until you hit GVW, rgawr, or gcw.  If you carry alot of stuff in your truck or the pin/tongue weights are higher 10/15% your max trailer weights will decrease quickly.

 

#iworkforGM 

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So your trailer GVWR is 11342lbs per that bottom sticker just under the VIN #.

 

If its a conventional trailer, your ideal tongue weight should be 10-15% of the weight of the trailer per GM.  So lets say you are running that trailer at 11,000lbs, you want 1,100-1,650lbs of tongue weight on the truck. 

 

If you are 5th wheel, GM says 15-25% of trailer weight for tongue weight.  So that would be 1,650-2,750lbs tongue weight at 11,000lbs trailer.  

 

GM's towing label uses the 10% number for conventional and 15% number for 5th wheel.   

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Yes it’s a conventional bumper pull. I see guys pulling these toyhauler a way bigger than mine with the same truck. Are they overweight and not caring or can you increase what the truck can do

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looking at the manufacturer site your dry hitch weight is 1142lb. loaded it'll be higher, but since you have more than 3000lb of payload, you're golden:

 

if you're estimating something like 1600lb loaded hitch weight and maybe 700lb people - it gives you 800lb for extra load on your truck. of course, only cat scale will gives you the right numbers.

 

 https://forestriverinc.com/rvs/toy-haulers/wolf-pack/25PACK12PLUS/1955

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sorry but i'm just unknowledgeable on this stuff.so counting my hitch weight and all passengers plus whatever i'm carrying i can't go over 3196lbs?how are these guys towing these huge 5th wheels with the same truck? are they just overweight?

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6 minutes ago, ultrascott said:

sorry but i'm just unknowledgeable on this stuff.so counting my hitch weight and all passengers plus whatever i'm carrying i can't go over 3196lbs?how are these guys towing these huge 5th wheels with the same truck? are they just overweight?

It depends on the actual weights ....  If you are talking about a triple axle toy hauler then it will be over the ratings of a 2500.  Something a bit more modest in size could stay below the max ratings.  Some will add airbags or change springs, but that doesn't change the legal limits.    

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Yes it’s a conventional bumper pull. I see guys pulling these toyhauler a way bigger than mine with the same truck. Are they overweight and not caring or can you increase what the truck can do
There's nothing you can do to increase your towing or payload. What's on the sticker is the MAX. Some people think adding 1500lb airbags increases your payload by 1500lbs but that isn't true.

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4 hours ago, GearHead71 said:

18,500 lbs for either a conventional trailer or fifth wheel is your max towing. This is my first time owning a 2500 but on my 1500 I hit my payload capacity long before I hit my towing capacity.

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had the same issue.

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1 hour ago, ultrascott said:

sorry but i'm just unknowledgeable on this stuff.so counting my hitch weight and all passengers plus whatever i'm carrying i can't go over 3196lbs?how are these guys towing these huge 5th wheels with the same truck? are they just overweight?

I see a lot of 5th wheels with undersized trucks in RV parks. This has become our family sport to spot them. With the power of the Duramax, it'll tow like a champ, but the first thing that any insurance company will ask you in case of a need would be to disclose the numbers. If you're overweight, you may end up without insurance coverage.

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