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Educate me on diesel.


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Well, after ordering my Sierra 1500 with the 3.0l diesel, I actually found one at a dealer, and is currently being shipped.  Will be here Tuesday 1/25.  I have a house in northern VT, and it gets extremely cold there at times.  This past Sunday was -22F.  Reading the manual online, it says DEF freezes at 12F.  What about the fuel gelling?  Is all this negated by just plugging in the block heater?  Is there and additive to the DEF or fuel to resist freezing?  Thanks in advance.

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23 minutes ago, slimjim2525 said:

Well, after ordering my Sierra 1500 with the 3.0l diesel, I actually found one at a dealer, and is currently being shipped.  Will be here Tuesday 1/25.  I have a house in northern VT, and it gets extremely cold there at times.  This past Sunday was -22F.  Reading the manual online, it says DEF freezes at 12F.  What about the fuel gelling?  Is all this negated by just plugging in the block heater?  Is there and additive to the DEF or fuel to resist freezing?  Thanks in advance.

 

DO NOT ADD ANYTHING TO THE DEF TANK.

 

The def tank has a heater. You only use def during a regen. Its more likely to be thawed out, before the truck is ready to regen.

 

I would read up on diesel grades and waxing and fuel treatments. I would carry a spare filter. I would plug in truck if at all possible anything under 25°F. I would find number 1 diesel for below 25. Number 1 and treatment for below zero.

 

Filter housing is heated by engine coolant. Keeping the coolant warm will dramatically help with the waxing of the filter. These new diesels have glow plugs and start very good at low temps. Some will say you don't need to plug in till zero, because they start so good. Starting is not the reason I plug in at 32 or lower. It's keeping the fuel system warm is.

 

I call my diesels, EV's during the winter months.

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Nothing you can add to the DEF.  The DEF system has 2 heaters, one in the tank, one in the line.  

 

Doesn't hurt to have some anti-gel.  Whatever additives you buy, no metals and no alcohols in them.  GM has some available as well.

 

Block heater won't work until 0F.  Thermostat control in the cord.    

Edited by newdude
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2 minutes ago, newdude said:

....

 

Block heater won't work until 0F.  Thermostat control in the cord.    

 

I don't argue online, specially with someone like you.

 

There must be different cords available, cause mine will work anytime they are plugged in.

 

Now the wifes 15 Yukon is a different story. Had to swap that damn bi-metal coin out of it for a washer.

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1 minute ago, gemarsh said:

 

I don't argue online, specially with someone like you.

 

There must be different cords available, cause mine will work anytime they are plugged in.

 

Now the wifes 15 Yukon is a different story. Had to swap that damn bi-metal coin out of it for a washer.

 

 

Hmm.  I guess anything is possible LOL.  I do know that the 6.6 Duramax, the cords are supposed to have one as well, and GM mentions in the manual about using it at 0F or colder.  I wish they'd be more clear on it than they are.  

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When we were running diesels and working in Oklahoma we didn’t have access to plug in. It got pretty cold. As far as fuel anti gel would be added to the fuel anywhere freezing would be a problem. Never had any problems with gelling. Or starting. I guess these new diesel like gas engines are more sensitive? Or maybe it’s the driver’s.

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1 hour ago, gemarsh said:

 

DO NOT ADD ANYTHING TO THE DEF TANK.

 

The def tank has a heater. You only use def during a regen. Its more likely to be thawed out, before the truck is ready to regen.

 

I would read up on diesel grades and waxing and fuel treatments. I would carry a spare filter. I would plug in truck if at all possible anything under 25°F. I would find number 1 diesel for below 25. Number 1 and treatment for below zero.

 

Filter housing is heated by engine coolant. Keeping the coolant warm will dramatically help with the waxing of the filter. These new diesels have glow plugs and start very good at low temps. Some will say you don't need to plug in till zero, because they start so good. Starting is not the reason I plug in at 32 or lower. It's keeping the fuel system warm is.

 

I call my diesels, EV's during the winter months.

DEF is used whenever it is running.

Fuel filter housing has a 12v electric heater. 

Plugging in does not keep the fuel warm.

 

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All good advice.  As cold as it has been and I'm on a bunch of FB groups for diesels and I'm not seeing much in the way of DEF freezing.  But like stated, do not add anything to it.

 

As for the fuel, as long as you find winter blend diesel you should be good.  It isn't like diesel of old that had more wax in it.  If you want to use a fuel anti gel, there are several on the market to try.  AMSOIL as their Diesel All-in-one that works well.

 

  adb-cn.jpg.72529c411c4d55f542570350721b89bd.jpg

Edited by Black02Silverado
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4 hours ago, redwngr said:

DEF is used whenever it is running.

Fuel filter housing has a 12v electric heater. 

Plugging in does not keep the fuel warm.

 

You are absolutely correct. I had a dumb ass attack. Completely gave bad advice on def useage.

 

PS... I am under the impression if the block heater is producing heat long enough, the fuel in the pump, injectors, rails and lines in the engine compartment are above ambient temp. Depending on the wind wiping away the heat.

 

In my world, feeding livestock in the middle of a cold spell, isn't the time I would want to be messing around changing fuel filters, or dragging something in the shop to unfreeze. Water lines are hard enough the way it is.

 

I'm glad gm supplies a winter cover on the HD's.

Edited by gemarsh
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18 hours ago, KARNUT said:

When we were running diesels and working in Oklahoma we didn’t have access to plug in. It got pretty cold. As far as fuel anti gel would be added to the fuel anywhere freezing would be a problem. Never had any problems with gelling. Or starting. I guess these new diesel like gas engines are more sensitive? Or maybe it’s the driver’s.

Based on society for over the last decade, I suspect it's the driver's

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21 hours ago, redwngr said:

DEF is used whenever it is running.

Fuel filter housing has a 12v electric heater. 

Plugging in does not keep the fuel warm.

 

^^^100% correct.

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I live in Alaska and haven't had any issues.  Every tank I add Opti-Lube Winter Anti Gel, works great and adds lubrication to the fuel system.  Good so far. 

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