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Do you change your oil yourself?


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How to Change Your Oil...Women:1. Pull up to Jiffy Lube 3000 miles after the last oil change.2. Drink a cup of coffee.3. Fifteen minutes later, write a check and leave with a properly maintained vehicle.

Men:1. Go to O'Reilly auto parts and write a check for 50 dollars for oil, filter, kitty litter, hand cleaner and scented tree.2. Discover that the used oil container is full. Instead of taking it back to O'Reilly to recycle, dump in hole in back yard.3. Open a beer and drink it.4. Jack car up. Spend 30 minutes looking for jack stands.5. Find jack stands under kid's pedal car.6. In frustration, open another beer and drink it.7. Place drain pan under engine.8. Look for 13mm box end wrench.9. Give up and use crescent wrench.10. Unscrew drain plug.11. Drop drain plug in pan of hot oil; get hot oil on hand in the process.12. Clean up.13. Have another beer while oil is draining.14. Look for oil filter wrench.15. Give up; poke oil filter with Phillips head screwdriver and twist it off.16. Beer.17. Buddy shows up. Finish case with him. Finish oil change tomorrow.18. Next day, drag pan full of old oil out from underneath car, dump in hole in back yard.19. Throw kitty litter on oil spilled during steps 11, 15, & 18.20. Beer. No, drank it all yesterday.21. Walk to 7-11 and buy beer.22. Install new oil filter making sure to apply thin coat of clean oil to gasket first.23. Dump first quart of fresh oil into engine.24. Remember drain plug from step 11.25. Hurry to find drain plug in drain pan. Pan is empty. Find drain plug in back yard hole.26. Hurry to replace drain plug as last drop of fresh oil drains onto floor.27. Slip with wrench and bang knuckles on frame.28. Bang head on bumper in reaction.29. Begin cussing fit.30. Throw wrench.31. Cuss for additional 10 minutes because wrench hit Miss December (1982).32. Clean up. Apply Band-Aid to knuckle.33. Beer.34. Beer.35. Dump in additional 4 quarts of oil.36. Beer.37. Lower car from jack stands.38. Accidentally crush one of the jack stands.39. Move car back to apply more kitty litter to fresh oil spilled during step 26.40. Drive car a quart low for 7000 miles when it'll be time for another oil change.

 

 

 

 

Hilarious. I spent $74 in Autozone for a M1filter and M1 oil. Found out on the net Walmart had a "rollback" on M1. $26/5qt jug. I have 10 jugs now. That's all my store had.

 

As for my drain plug, I didn't replace the stock one. I don't believe a tiny magnet on the tip of a drain plug has a snowball's chance in hell of doing much. The oil doesn't go from the pan to the bearings, it is pressure fed thru the filter, then to the main oil galley, to the bearings and other oiling points. Besides, I wouldn't pay $35 + $6 shipping to get a drain plug.

 

 

I've been doing my own for 30 years.... I've never heard of filling the filter with oil first. What's the reason? Thanks!

 

Tests have shown that a large part of the wear on engines occurs at start-up before the oil pump can "float" the bearings and distribute oil to other areas. The residual oil that didn't drain back, essentially the film of oil on everything, is what stands between metal to metal contact of these components, until the pressurized oil reaches the components. Filling the filter shortens the time it takes to get the oil flowing. That's all.

 

Will it make a difference in how long the engine lasts? Who knows? I dunno. But it makes me feel good to fill the filter and see that oil pressure jump right up on start-up after an oil change. It's probably a 2-4 second difference.

 

This is why synthetic oils are such good wear performers. They protect much better during this initial start-up phase and during cold oil operation.

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Just ordered a Fumoto...have one on my last two Cummins and had well over half a million miles on those valves without a drip.

 

As for the above picture...with a quality oil and good filters, there are OTR trucks with over half a million miles without an oil change. I did extended drain intervals on my Cummins, the valve cover was spotless inside. That photo might not have anything to do with the lack of maintenance, but more to do with a sludge monster engine like some of the VWs.

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I've been doing my own for 30 years.... I've never heard of filling the filter with oil first. What's the reason? Thanks![/quotes hen

 

I was taught to fill the oil filter in auto shop in high school, the reason explained to me was it does take a period of time for the oil system to fill the filter and a pump/circulate the oil. It probably takes milliseconds for this to occur and you do have residual oil left through out, however. I look at it as good practice even on a vehicle where the oil filter is horizontal

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i just ordered a Fumoto F107N and a Adapter from ebay, thanks for the idea, i would have never know about them if it weren't for this post,

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i just ordered a Fumoto F107N and a Adapter from ebay, thanks for the idea, i would have never know about them if it weren't for this post,

 

That is the same model I installed on my Sierra. I have never used one of these valves before. I changed my oil a couple weeks ago and got to use it for the first time. It was really nice being able to slowly open the valve and let the oil start to drain vs having that huge burst that came with removing the factory bolt (which is followed by missing the drain pan followed by lot's of swearing). Drain time was a little longer but this doesn't bother me as I'm in no hurry.

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That is the same model I installed on my Sierra. I have never used one of these valves before. I changed my oil a couple weeks ago and got to use it for the first time. It was really nice being able to slowly open the valve and let the oil start to drain vs having that huge burst that came with removing the factory bolt (which is followed by missing the drain pan followed by lot's of swearing). Drain time was a little longer but this doesn't bother me as I'm in no hurry.

The only thing I read negative was the fumoto plug threads stick into the oil pan 1/2" thus potentially leaving heavy particles or build up in the bottom of the oil pan. Anyone with one of these plugs ever have an issue? There is no provision for a magnet either. I am looking to buy a fumoto plug but not sure I like the idea of the oil not completely draining from the oil pan.

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Alternatively to filling the oil filter you can dry start the engine a few times to "primer" it. Regardless if you fill the filter or not you will get some time with no oil in the engine. You really only need to do this during a new engine build when no existing oil is coating the internals.

Next time you change your oil look at how long it takes all the oil residue to drain off the pan. It takes hours and hours. an oil change should only take 10-20 minutes from drain to fill to start.

Also the oiling of the oring is to lube it so when you spin the filter on it doesn't get in a bind and break or misalign and cause a leak.

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A dry filter will take from a few seconds to maybe 5 seconds to fill and indicate pressure. It isn't terribly long, but start-up is where a large part of the wear occurs, per the oil mfrs. Side mounted filters don't allow for pre-filling. But our trucks...why not pre-fill? It takes only a few seconds to do and you really don't have to fill it up to the tippy-top. When you fill it the first time, it will go down as it's absorbed into the filter media. Fill it again and it will go down part way again. I fill them so I can see oil in the center hole about halfway down, so I don't spill it. The media is pre-wetted, which is most of what takes the time to run thru a dry filter. You can see the difference in time from start-up to indicated pressure.

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Steve, Yep, that's the way I change mine! Oil all over all me glasses, up me arms, on me face. That's the right way to change ye oil.

 

Looking at the Fumoto valve, looks like to me it's about flush with inside oil pan, eh?

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The only thing I read negative was the fumoto plug threads stick into the oil pan 1/2" thus potentially leaving heavy particles or build up in the bottom of the oil pan. Anyone with one of these plugs ever have an issue? There is no provision for a magnet either. I am looking to buy a fumoto plug but not sure I like the idea of the oil not completely draining from the oil pan.

 

I could see that being an issue but it probably varies between engine manufactures. The factory drain plug on my Sierra was pretty long and the threads into the oil pan were pretty deep. The Fumoto valve is a little shorter. On top of all this our engines have the oil drain plug slopped towards one side which should ensure all oil is getting to the drain hole. Combine this with Fumoto thread length being a little shorter then the depth of threads in the drain hole, all the oil that can get out should get out.

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Its not like the pan is a calm environment that allows all this "goop" to collect if quality oil is used and the vehicle is driven. Our oil is a lot different from the days when sludge was a common issue.

 

I replaced the pan gasket on my Cummins at 250k with all those miles on extended drains and a fumoto that left at least a half inch of oil in the pan (you need to understand the drain plug and bung in the Cummins). That pan didn't even have a film in it.

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I could see that being an issue but it probably varies between engine manufactures. The factory drain plug on my Sierra was pretty long and the threads into the oil pan were pretty deep. The Fumoto valve is a little shorter. On top of all this our engines have the oil drain plug slopped towards one side which should ensure all oil is getting to the drain hole. Combine this with Fumoto thread length being a little shorter then the depth of threads in the drain hole, all the oil that can get out should get out.

or park the truck on a block to allow the oil to lean to the side where fumoto valve is,

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