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Do you change your oil yourself?


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I have been changing my own oil since I got my license ( except lately with my wife's ATS and this Silverado having the free dealer changes) I have always just used the factory plug, although on some of the older V8 motors I had, I got one of those magnets that you place right near the drain plug on the pan to collect the shavings.

 

I did the Silverado oil at 1,000 miles to get the factory break in stuff out, then had the dealer do their first free one at 3500. Will get the other 3 free changes then go back to doing it myself. It was a breeze, especially with the 2.5 RC I didn't even need to jack it up!

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I always change my own oil. Been doing it for 20 years. But I've been letting the dealer do the free oil changes on my new trucks. My dealer even throws in another pair for 3 years of free service. So, in 2019 I'll start changing my own oil again.

 

I always find it funny that some people think that they know better than the dealership techs. One of those techs probably changes more oil in a week than 99% of people on here do in their entire lives. ~15 per day * 5 days = 75 oil changes. At 3 changes per year, that would take an individual owner 25 years to match one week of a service technician. But whatever makes you happy.

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I used to change my own oil, but not on this truck. My dealer charges $90 for the 8-quart oil change and tire rotation. I would pay over $50 for the oil and filter at Wal Mart and I would still have to rotate the tires without a lift and reset the TPMS. It's not worth the aggravation and mess for me to do it in my garage. I also won't have any arguments with the dealer about oil changes if I have any warranty problems.

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I do not think anyone is questioning the skill and knowledge of the techs, but maybe that its just another 1 out of the 75 they do per week. it is not something special to them and it is not their personal car

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And "dealership" techs aren't oil changers. Up here especially it's high school kids in from the RAP program... or some guy that can't speak english... They don't waste talented individuals in the lube bay. It really doesn't matter how many they do a day... most of them wouldn't even know what they are looking at lol.

 

Sent from my SM-G900W8 using Tapatalk

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Had a family member who took their truck for its first oil change to the selling Toyota dealership. Pulled out and got a mile down the road and the engine seized, tech forgot to put oil back in it. The company I work for has also had ruined engines from oil change guy either not putting enough oil or none at all. It happens, that is why I always check my oil level before I leave the dealership. I have always changed my own oil but both of my vehicles had 2 years of free oil changes and those are coming to and end this summer. You may also want to check your drain plug if you have been letting the dealership do it, they mangled the plug up on my Jeep and had to make them replace it. I have also got rust spots on my silverado's lug nuts from the guy not using a deep enough socket when he throws the air wrench to it.

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Sometims the most menial of task get equivalent effort from those doing them. The guys at my dealership only do oil changes and tire rotations, no repairs. Again, thete is no reason anyone should install and tighten an oil filter with a power wrench. Hand tight is all it calls on the filter can.

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on my 2013 Denali, the free oil changes were sloppy, oil on my frame and front diff cover dripped in my driveway no sense of quality job, I get the lube techs make a mess on the GMT-900 chassis as the drain plug was right next to the frame, but no excuse not to clean it up,

 

 

2016 Denali, I will ask my dealer for the parts and do myself. (GM did relocate the drain plug on these K2xx engines)

 

I have a oil sucker at home, uses pneumatic/air compressor, (that's how we did it when I was a tech bumper to bumper tech, I did everything except transmission, I refused tranny work, oil changes, HVAC, internal engine Gas/Diesel, interior trim & all electronics ) get under check the drain plug (almost nothing comes out, its ok to skip removing the plug, if you know what your doing but always inspect the plug), preload filter with oil, install new filter, check oil level, reset oil life done!

 

Wish GM had a top loaded oil filter housing this underneath stuff is old and outdated, damn engineers overlooked what could have saved them warranty time aka money! for basic lube & filter change if done all up top "most" Mercedes-Benz are, some AMG's engines are the exception to this rule. most MB oil changes take about 5 mins max with the correct tools.

 

I'll be lucky to spend more than 15 minutes doing my own oil change on my vehicles, super clean and no mess.

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I always change my own oil. Been doing it for 20 years. But I've been letting the dealer do the free oil changes on my new trucks. My dealer even throws in another pair for 3 years of free service. So, in 2019 I'll start changing my own oil again.

 

I always find it funny that some people think that they know better than the dealership techs. One of those techs probably changes more oil in a week than 99% of people on here do in their entire lives. ~15 per day * 5 days = 75 oil changes. At 3 changes per year, that would take an individual owner 25 years to match one week of a service technician. But whatever makes you happy.

Been changing mine for near 50 years, but number of years or the number of times performed for a simple task like changing oil has little to do with additional knowledge or precision gained respective to the task. There is a big difference between gaining 10 years experience and gaining 1 year's experience ten times in a row, e.g. repeating freshman year 4 times doesn't qualify one for a high school diploma or someone flipping burgers for 2 months doesn't produce a better burger than someone one doing it for a day. And having changed oil in my uncle's gas station I can verify that it doesn't take more than a day, or too much brains to gain expert experience to loosen/hand tighten and then properly torque an oil drain plug or install a spin on or cartridge filter properly .......but I've encountered work where so called experienced mechanics stripped/cross threaded drain plugs on iron pans and cracked aluminum drain pans using air wrenches and double gasketed or install spin-ons with a dry gasket and torqued the crap out of them with a strap wrench. I learned my lesson early-on when changing oil on my dad's dealer serviced 2 yo Impala and found a slotted tapered, thread cutting replacement drain plug with two gaskets because some experienced "mechanic" bougered the threads.

 

And I have the 2 yr. free oil/filter maintenance on my 4 vehicles, but they can keep them....a few bucks and a few minutes time to do the maintenance at 3-5K intervals is worth the confidence that the job was done right, I'm running full synthetic. and no damage was done.....and not waiting for some engine killing DIC to tell me when I'm entitled to have a dealer give me a free change. I'm the only person that has ever touched my vehicles' drain plugs or replaced their filters and never had a leak or lubrication related engine problem.

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.......

 

 

Wish GM had a top loaded oil filter housing this underneath stuff is old and outdated, damn engineers overlooked what could have saved them warranty time aka money! for basic lube & filter change if done all up top "most" Mercedes-Benz are, some AMG's engines are the exception to this rule. most MB oil changes take about 5 mins max with the correct tools.

 

I'll be lucky to spend more than 15 minutes doing my own oil change on my vehicles, super clean and no mess.

Have the 3.6l in my Traverse and the PF63 oil filter is damned near impossible to change, no clearance from underneath....only room for one arm to reach down blindly to the bottom of the engine to unscrew the filter and try to bring it back up.....worse the threaded standpipe is angled downwards and to the left......not easy to get the right angle with one hand blindly to start the thread.....wouldn't even trust the dealer to attempt it for fear of strong arming it in the area and damaging the encroaching wiring and A/C lines and seals.

 

BUT, have the same 3.6l engine (DI, but same block) in my RWD Camaro longitudinally mounted instead of the FWD transverse mount and sitting there on the top right side is a cartridge type oil filter housing with a nice large 3/4 nut on top.......unscrew the top, pull out the cartridge, insert a replacement and screw the top back. Total time less than 30 sec. and not one drop of oil spilled.

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Total time less than 30 sec. and not one drop of oil spilled.

 

Thomcat, I meant 15mins total, to extract the oil out, swap filter, refill, reset oil life, check and test.

 

but yes you get what I was saying top loaded filter cartridge are awesome and easy, I didn't know the 3.6 DI had top loaded system that really pisses me off about our V8's

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Thomcat, I meant 15mins total, to extract the oil out, swap filter, refill, reset oil life, check and test.

 

but yes you get what I was saying top loaded filter cartridge are awesome and easy, I didn't know the 3.6 DI had top loaded system that really pisses me off about our V8's

Agreed. That's also about what it takes me for a complete job including ramp time, draining, filling and storing the used oil.......but the filter change itself on the Camaro's top load filter could be done in less than 30 sec. if I was in a rush. Worse it pisses me off that the FWD transverse mounting of the same V6 engine uses an almost impossible to safely change without causing collateral damage bottom mounted filter that can only be changed blindly from the top........which including messy cleanup takes me over half an hour

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if so do you:

 

1) Use the original drain plug?

2) Use a magnetic drain plug?

3) Use a Fumoto easy drain plug?

4) Use a ez-drain drain plug?

 

 

For years I used a magnetic drain plug. But I heard of items 3 and 4 and thought I might give them a try.

 

What say you?

 

 

1. Yes

2. Don't care

3. No

4. No

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Wish GM had a top loaded oil filter housing this underneath stuff is old and outdated, damn engineers overlooked what could have saved them warranty time aka money! for basic lube & filter change if done all up top "most" Mercedes-Benz are, some AMG's engines are the exception to this rule. most MB oil changes take about 5 mins max with the correct tools.

 

before the ATS, my wife had 1 2010 Malibu with the 4 cyl(great car). Anyway that engine had the top loading cartridge oil filter, man was that the best and easiest oil changer ever!

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1. Yes

2. Don't care

3. No

4. No

1. = Yes And never had a leak or a lubrication related engine problem.

 

2. = No original plug is just fine with the proper length, seating and reproducible sealing ability without thread damage if installed properly. Ever occur to you that a magnetic drain plug in a steel oil pan imparts some magnetism to the steel oil pan? And some particles may magnetically adhere top the bottom of the pan instead of being trapped by the filter and remain after the drain just waiting for the next pothole to be jarred loose again.

 

3 & 4 Yeah, great idea to spend money on a spring loaded plug to save the trouble of wasting 20 seconds to remove a solid plug. Thus, loosing confidence of knowing you have a positive leak proof seal not subject to the dependability of a two cent spring or damage from a rock hit, the protruding softer brass appendage more susceptible to a rock hit than the low profile steel OEM plug.

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