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todoubled05

Forum/truck Abbreviations And Slang

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What is gmt 900?

 

2007+ NNBS trucks

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Here's one that IMO has been overlooked.

 

My friend became a union rep and this was part of his ficticious email address that he would give to his members who would whine alot. The term is...DILLIGAF

 

Which means...Does It Look Like I Give A F**k?!!!!!!!!!! :lol:

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I noticed NBS, and NNBS were nulled and replaced by the corresponding Model #'s. Can one of the other terms be removed as well; OBS and OOBS wasn't there a GMT400 that can replace one of those?

 

-Thanks Ryan!

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It may be self explanitory, but I noticed that the term "noob" has been used in about 7 or 8 posts in this very thread, but is not on the list... ironic?

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C/K truck: '73 to '87

R/V truck: '88 to '92(?) full size Blazers/Jimmys, crew cabs & Subs

 

I know RP is Royal Purple oil, but what is GC oil?

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C/K truck: '73 to '87

R/V truck: '88 to '92(?) full size Blazers/Jimmys, crew cabs & Subs

Actually, '73-'87's were the R/V series, the '88-'98 pickups were the C/K body style. The Blazer/Jimmy, Subs, and crew cabs were the R/V series as long as they looked like the '73-'87 pickups.

 

Travis

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C/K truck: '73 to '87

R/V truck: '88 to '92(?) full size Blazers/Jimmys, crew cabs & Subs

Actually, '73-'87's were the R/V series, the '88-'98 pickups were the C/K body style. The Blazer/Jimmy, Subs, and crew cabs were the R/V series as long as they looked like the '73-'87 pickups.

 

Travis

 

 

Your source being....?

 

I was in the Oshawa Truck Plant from '85 to '88. During the changeover to the GMT400. We had never heard of the R/V designation until the carryover trucks were renamed.

 

GMC has used the C/K designation to denote 4 x 2 & 4 x 4 trucks since the 40s. See:

 

Click

 

Click

 

Also from Wikipedia:

 

The L05 was introduced in 1987 for use in Chevrolet/GMC trucks in both the GMT400 (introduced in April 1987 as 1988 models) and the R/V series trucks such as the K5 Blazer, Suburban, and rounded-era pickups formerly classed as the C/K until 1996 which includes chassis cabs and 4-door crew cabs. Although usage was for trucks, vans, and 9C1-optioned Caprices, the L05 was also used with the following vehicles:
Edited by revrnd

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C/K truck: '73 to '87

R/V truck: '88 to '92(?) full size Blazers/Jimmys, crew cabs & Subs

Actually, '73-'87's were the R/V series, the '88-'98 pickups were the C/K body style. The Blazer/Jimmy, Subs, and crew cabs were the R/V series as long as they looked like the '73-'87 pickups.

 

Travis

 

Your source being....?

 

I was in the Oshawa Truck Plant from '85 to '88. During the changeover to the GMT400. We had never heard of the R/V designation until the carryover trucks were renamed.

 

GMC has used the C/K designation to denote 4 x 2 & 4 x 4 trucks since the 40s. See:

 

Click

 

Click

 

Also from Wikipedia:

 

The L05 was introduced in 1987 for use in Chevrolet/GMC trucks in both the GMT400 (introduced in April 1987 as 1988 models) and the R/V series trucks such as the K5 Blazer, Suburban, and rounded-era pickups formerly classed as the C/K until 1996 which includes chassis cabs and 4-door crew cabs. Although usage was for trucks, vans, and 9C1-optioned Caprices, the L05 was also used with the following vehicles:

 

Maybe it's a regional thing, and maybe every technician that I've worked alongside has been wrong, but every GM dealership that I have worked at referred to the body styles as such. In fact, I've got a 1987 GMC truck drivability and emissions service manual (for the R/V models) sitting next to me right now that has in parentheses "Includes 1988 C/K Models". I'll agree that if you go by the 5th digit in the VIN from '81 and up, every fullsize regulare cab or extended cab pickup is C or K, but that's just how I've always been told and referred to them. Maybe I'm wrong, but I sure as heck don't put alot of faith in Wikipedia.

 

Travis

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You can choose to ignore the Wikipedia info, but they aren't alone in their explanation of the C/K truck.

 

Click

 

Click

 

I recall my father (who worked in the tooling office) telling me that the carryover trucks from the '87 styling would be called R/Vs.

 

Model breakdown in the 80s (& mostly still in use)

 

TK10703 (my 1st truck)

 

T = GMC

 

K = 4 x 4

 

1 = 1/2 ton

 

07 = short box

 

03 = regular cab

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Includes 1988 C/K Models".

 

After we started building the GMT400 in Dec' of '86, we referred to the new trucks by their designation GMT400. We never called the new trucks C/Ks. I returned to the plant in '97, just before our changeover to the GMT800. It was then that the powres to be decided the trucks needed model names :rolleyes: .

 

I wish people on here could take the time to refer to their truck(s) by the proper term. None of this NNBS nonsense. What are they going to call the K2XX? NNNBS :fume: (again).

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C and K are still used in the VIN to designate 2 and 4 wheel drive.

 

Yes :rolleyes:

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I didn't know anything about that. I was thinking GC was a brand. I had never heard of the "thin oil myth". IIRC, the oil weights/viscosity explanation was taught in Grade 9 auto shop. The 1st prefix before the W is the viscosity @ low temps & the suffix is the weight @ a higher temp. I'm sure you'll post what those temps are. I think the low test temp' is -25* F.

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