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Hi, this is my first GMC.  It came with 275/60R20 tires.  Just wondering what people are using for winter tires?

 

What size? does it mess up your speedo using a different size?

Are you using pressure sensors? If not what happens?

 

I have always had toyotas and used P rated bridgestone Blizzaks.  They are not available in the close sizes as I ca only seem to find LT rated tires in the closest size that matches 275/70R18

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Factory tires may be OK, depending what you have. I drove 3 winters on the crappy goodyear SRA's and didn't get stuck, and those are cheap garbage. But Cooper Discoverer AT3 4S do great in snow.

 

Are you actually driving on packed snow and ice for 6 months straight? Like in the mountains? Then dedicated snow tires are useful.

 

If you drive on plowed pavement which is only actually covered in snow a few days a winter, then just keep your current tires and just use 4 auto on those days. Adding some bags of sand in the rear end will help even out the weight distribution and give you the added safety of easy traction if you get stuck.

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Back when I used to drive in the snow, I used Mastercraft winter tires on my 1-wheel-peel 2wd ranger in Buffalo with a little weight over the wheels did fine in the snow for the massive snowfalls we received.

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275/60/20s are 33" so someone upgraded the tires. Are they stock, you have a picture?

I just use AT tires year around and does great in NY winters. If you need new tires consider Cooper AT/3 or AT/4s and you will be good year around.

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I used to run 16"/33" BFG AT/KOs year-round on a Tahoe, but then I got a lowered Sierra and ran 20" Hankook Ventus RH06 summer and 20" Blizzak DM V1s in the winter.  Pretty good combination for handling year-round.

 

On this one I still have the crap no-season 22" Alenzas I run in summer, but I got a set of 275/60R20 Duratracs for winter.  They do well.  The Alenzas would probably do ok in 4-auto full-time, but I didn't want to run the bigger rims in winter either.

 

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IMO

I used to buy BF Goodrich or Cooper AT's.

Lived in the city with occasional mountain driving to a remote cabin.

Got tired of the cost and road noise.

 

Now I live in the mountains.

Drive 3 miles of dirt road in and out of our place with some steep grades.

The roads are maintained.

I currently have Cooper Star Fire tires that are rated M&S.

No as aggressive of a tread.

 

I have not had any problems and there's no weight in the bed.

I'm retired so if the weather is bad I stay home.

 

If you like the look of the more aggressive tread I get that.

If you are good at driving on snow covered roads and have 4 wheel drive with the locking rear differential I see no problems.

 

If you must go off road or play in the snow I get a more aggressive tire.

 

This is my first 4 wheel drive truck. Drove a 2 wheel drive for many rears in the snow and they were all limited slip. So one wheel drive.

:)

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Welcome to the forum!  Providing us some more information may result in more accurate responses.  For example, what type of tires are on your truck and what type of driving conditions are you expecting?  If your truck is 4wd and came with all season tires you will be fine for most road conditions.  If you have the money, dedicated snow tires are ideal.  They help you brake as well as go!

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The best winter tires are the tires that will be on your truck when you drive south for the winter. 😉

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Posted (edited)

I plan on using the Duratracs that come with my off road performance pack. They are actually pretty solid tires for deep snow.

 

Where they start to fall behind is on ice, where dedicated winters (esp with studs) perform much better. Overall dedicated winters are much better, but I have always found the gap to be a fair bit smaller for Truck AT tires to Truck winters than passenger car all seasons to winters. I would run something mountain snowflake rated for sure, just know the bar for that symbol is not very high if you see real winter.

 

For size, Just keep same overall diameter tire, but a little less rim always helps.

Edited by killramos

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I used Cooper AT3's on my Ram years back and they were great in all weather conditions. Once these stock tires wear out, I'll be replacing with the Coopers.

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Almost nothing beats a true full purpose winter tire.  Nokian Hakkapeliitta, Bridgestone Blizzak, Firestone Winterforce, etc.  As for non specific winter tires, Goodyear Wrangler Duratrac work great in the snow, ok on ice.  Most good AT type tires will handle snow ok/good. 

 

Having 3 sets of winter tires in the family (all Nokian) however, hard to beat them.  My brother's open diff 2004 Town Car can drive through just about everything, as can the front drive 2009 Mariner.  Snow, ice, etc. they handle it all and very well.   

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When I lived in Northern Michigan where snow meant feet of it falling at a time (no joke, they didn’t start plowing until 4” had accumulated on the ground) I always ran aggressively sipes mud terrains. Big voids and lugs to dig through the deep snow and lots of sipes and softer rubber to grab the slick stuff. Worked great. Even bought my own siping/grooving knife. 

 

That said, if your snowfall isn’t that severe you want more ice and slick road traction.

 

Best solution for me was to move south. In Western Kentucky last winter I think we got 3” of snow all winter. Could have used drag slicks. 

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1 hour ago, newdude said:

My brother's open diff 2004 Town Car can drive through just about everything, as can the front drive 2009 Mariner.  Snow, ice, etc. they handle it all and very well.   

I have put plenty of miles on front wheel drive cars without nanny systems. They are way more sure footed in snow than a truck. Until you put the truck in 4WD.

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5 hours ago, Ozer said:

275/60/20s are 33" so someone upgraded the tires. Are they stock, you have a picture?

I just use AT tires year around and does great in NY winters. If you need new tires consider Cooper AT/3 or AT/4s and you will be good year around.

Those were stock on my AT4

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