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GM Recalls 1 Mil Vehicles, 10 Models Due to Trapped Hydrogen Gas

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2018-Buick-Regal-GS-028.jpg

John Goreham
Contributing Writer, GM-Trucks.com
9-13-2018

General Motors is recalling 10 models and about 1 million total vehicles for a reason we have never heard before. The apparent cause of the recall is that the rear brakes may contain trapped hydrogen gas. As any mechanic knows, any trapped gas in a brake line can cause problems, notably a soft pedal as the gas expands and contracts. GM says it knows of no accidents due to the issue. The solution is to bleed the brakes.

 

The affected models includes 2018 and 2019 MY vehicles: GMC Terrain, Buick Lacrosse and Regal, Cadillac XTS and Chevrolet Cruze, Equinox, Volt, Impala, Bolt, and the Chevrolet Malibu.

 

To see if your brakes may contain a hydrogen bubble check it here at GM's VIN lookup.

 

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I'd be more worried about gas trapped in the seats.

But that's just me.

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Sounds like GM uses hydrogen on the brake system to help bleed them.  They must use a sealed system to perform the bleeding though, that big blimp in the 30's demonstrated what hydrogen gas can do. 

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I'd bet the gas is a product of the brake fluid and some other component in the system.  Chemical reaction etc etc.  They may also replace the fluid with something else.  Just a guess though.

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8 hours ago, Doug_Scott said:

, that big blimp in the 30's demonstrated what hydrogen gas can do. 

Except it's much less dangerous than gasoline. The energy content in gasoline is much higher.

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On 18/09/2018 at 10:01 PM, SnakeEyeSS said:

Except it's much less dangerous than gasoline. The energy content in gasoline is much higher.

I doubt they would ever use gasoline in brake lines.  I don't even understand how hydrogen gas ended up in the brake lines in the first place.  I don't see the advantage over any other gas.  Surely they could have used an inert gas. 

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