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Number of Cranks on Cold Start?


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When cold, my 6.2L can take as many as 10 full turnovers before it actually starts to run. There's no issue when it's warm. It fires right up. Anyone else's perform the same on cold startup? I only have about 1100 miles on it so I'm thinking it could get better as it breaks in.

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While Direct Injection needs a few seconds to prime the injectors vs. sequential fuel injection, it shouldn't be anywhere near 10 cranks.

 

You should only have to turn the key once and it should go away. Warm engine starts will fire up significantly faster, since the fuel rails are already primed. But cold starts it wouldn't be uncommon for 3-4 cranks after one key turn.

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Mine does this. Here it's gone from 20 degrees to 80 degrees in two days so I got to compare back to back. It definitely wasn't ten cranks though. Three, maybe four at most on the cold day, but today it started on the first one. These trucks don't seem to like being cold very much. It's almost like they go into an open loop when they're cold and a closed loop once they warm up. Maybe someone who knows more about the ECU can chime in on that one, but the evidence is there. I'd still get yours checked out though. Ten cranks is way too many imo, especially on a new truck.


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My 5.3 did a similar thing early one morning, was about 25°. I've gotten in the habit to bump the ignition as others describe and let the engine start itself, that morning it took maybe 5-8 seconds to crank over while it usually takes 1 or less. I'd bet it was just the cold temps, if it does it when warm I'd have it looked at for sure.

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No for nothing, but you don't have to hold the key in place for it to start. It will crank after one bump of the key.

 

This guys correct. One short bump of the key turn and the computer takes over and will continue to prime/inject until the engine starts. I've let off the key early a few cold morning just from habit and I'm always amazed how the computer keeps right on cranking until the engine is purring. Quite impressive for GMC. I like it.

 

If you're truck is not doing this and/or is taking that many attempts to start...you have a problem. Either with the fuel like Brent Adams suggested or a problem with the engine itself.

 

Good luck and keep up posted on resolving this issue.

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This guys correct. One short bump of the key turn and the computer takes over and will continue to prime/inject until the engine starts. I've let off the key early a few cold morning just from habit and I'm always amazed how the computer keeps right on cranking until the engine is purring. Quite impressive for GMC. I like it.

 

If you're truck is not doing this and/or is taking that many attempts to start...you have a problem. Either with the fuel like Brent Adams suggested or a problem with the engine itself.

 

Good luck and keep up posted on resolving this issue.

Been that way for years, most people just don't realize. I didn't know my G8 did the same thing until my 3rd year of ownership lol!

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I have no idea the key worked like that until I saw a friend just "bump" his key on his 2008 silverado. I asked him.. he said it's been like that. I thought cool... Never knew.. I was always just used to the old "turn until it cranks" method.

 

Now on my 2014.. I'm pretty much in the habit of just bumping the key once..

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