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Gorehamj

Which Trucks Do Owners Most Often Sell Within One Year?

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titan 17 crew cab front 34.jpg

John Goreham
Contributing Writer, GM-Trucks.com
4-9-2019

iSeeCars.com has completed a study this month of which vehicles owners most often sell on within one year of buying them new. iSeeCars.com analyzed more than 46 million individual new vehicle sales and determined how many of those new cars, trucks, and SUVs were resold as used within the first year with at least 1000 miles on the odometer.  The average for all vehicles is just 3.4%. However, some trucks are sold on at more than twice that rate. 

iseecars trucks sold one year.png

Among the trucks that owners want to get rid of most are Nissan trucks. All three of Nissan's truck offerings top the list of those owners sell most often within one year of ownership. iSeeCars CEO Phong Ly offered his opinion as to why the Nissans stand out in this regard. “The standard full-size Titan and its larger XD variant do not measure up to their rivals in terms of towing capacity and hauling, which suggests that owners might turn them in for something more rugged,” said Ly. “The compact Frontier has the same shortcomings for hauling and towing while also having the worst fuel economy in its class.”

 

What say you GM-Trucks.com faithful? Why do the Nissans seem to be the outliers here?  To see the full report click here.

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The car numbers suprised me much more than the truck numbers but I did not read the entire article, mostly just looked at the lists and wondered what number of these people sold after one year just to buy another one exactly like it but a year newer model, such as my father did with his Benz or my father-in-law did with his Beamer every two years. Both claimed they started to lose value too fast after that. I'm a truck guy and keep 'em forever and a few years after that. 

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Posted (edited)

The only thing I find surprising is the GMC Sierra at the number 6th position.  The Tundra-is an outdated gas hog-no surprises there.

 

The Titan XD is plagued with quality issues-and the diesel version drinks DEF-at least according to the forums I have perused on the Internet.  Also-it's longer than the "Big 3" short bed trucks and won't fit in to an average garage. In short-a truck where the market is very limited.

Edited by CKNSLS
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Ram beats GM in this category :(  

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Some trade because they can, and they have a 'keep it fresh' attitude.

 

Some trade because of financial issues and want to get the money out of vehicle or reduce payments if financed or leased.

 

Some trade because they've discovered the vehicle won't do they job they thought it would do. 

 

 

I know one person that is never happy with any vehicle and keeps trading and changing brands.  Always seems to have issues that nobody else with the same vehicle seems to be having.

I suspect the local dealers get together and decide who gets stuck with him 'this time'. 

Sort of amusing to watch.

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I thought I was bad every two-three years. I would buy leftovers at discounts and usually be even on the trade in. And not be picky on colors or options and buy on the lot the longest deals. My 14 was 27K for a 40K truck bought on 12-31-13. Every year that’s got to be costly.


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On 4/10/2019 at 2:25 PM, Sierra Dan said:

Ram beats GM in this category :(  

Silverado wasn't listed and is the "bulk" of GM truck's sales.

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On 4/18/2019 at 1:27 PM, KARNUT said:

I thought I was bad every two-three years. I would buy leftovers at discounts and usually be even on the trade in. And not be picky on colors or options and buy on the lot the longest deals. My 14 was 27K for a 40K truck bought on 12-31-13. Every year that’s got to be costly.

 

No, I'm the same way, and I think it's a great plan! My 2012 F-150 was MSRP'd at 39k, bought for 29k, traded in four lears later for 24k. I had a Benz, bought for $40k, traded in for $13k four years later, never again! I only buy if I can get $10k off and it holds value well.

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With German cars like Audi/Benz/BMW you're almost always better off leasing it unless you plan to drive the thing into the ground. 

 

If you're the kind of person who wants a new version every 2-3 years a lease makes way more sense for the German stuff. 

 

As for GM, they lose value pretty quickly too. 

 

Wife's 2010 Suburban stickered for $55k. I bought it used in 2013 with 40k miles on it for $30k. Still going strong with 140k miles now and just basic maintenance/service. 

 

So that first guy basically paid $8k/year (or $25,000 for 40k miles of use) and I bought the thing for just over 1/2 of the MSRP.

 

Lots of full-size SUVs in the 2-3 year old range at fractions of their new cost with even less mileage. 

 

With the fully loaded Suburbans cresting $70k now I'm not sure why I'd buy a new one when I could wait 2 years and buy that same thing with 30k miles on it for $40k or something.

 

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Posted (edited)
3 hours ago, therapy said:

As for GM, they lose value pretty quickly too. 

 

Wife's 2010 Suburban stickered for $55k. I bought it used in 2013 with 40k miles on it for $30k. Still going strong with 140k miles now and just basic maintenance/service. 

 

So that first guy basically paid $8k/year (or $25,000 for 40k miles of use) and I bought the thing for just over 1/2 of the MSRP.


Except that guy almost certainly didn't actually pay anything close to $55k for it. A quick look on cars.com shows a bunch of Suburbans going for 17%+ off sticker price. That drops that 2010 Suburban for $55k down to around $45k, and I'm sure even better deals than that were possible if his timing was just right.

 

For whatever reason the SUVs seem to really get nailed in early depreciation compared to the trucks too. Was definitely part of the reason I went for a truck. The trucks seem to be pretty amazing really in terms of holding value, as far as vehicles go.

Edited by relevante
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Can't imagine flipping vehicle like that, short of joining the "more money than sense" club.  I settle for buying an older truck with a good body/frame for cheap, fix up any drivetrain problems it may have, then drive it into the ground.  My current truck took a couple $K to get running right, and some more to add 4wd to it, but since then, it's been very reliable and hasn't need much in the way of fixing.  And having no payments adds up to a lot of money very quickly...

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40 minutes ago, relevante said:


Except that guy almost certainly didn't actually pay anything close to $55k for it. A quick look on cars.com shows a bunch of Suburbans going for 17%+ off sticker price. That drops that 2010 Suburban for $55k down to around $45k, and I'm sure even better deals than that were possible if his timing was just right.

 

For whatever reason the SUVs seem to really get nailed in early depreciation compared to the trucks too. Was definitely part of the reason I went for a truck. The trucks seem to be pretty amazing really in terms of holding value, as far as vehicles go.

A quick check on Suburbans shows a 2019 4WD 1500 Premier has a sticker price of between $72k-$80k depending on features.. Most of them can be had for around $65k.

 

Likewise, a search on 4WD 1500 Premier suburbans from 2016-2018 with less than 35k miles shows they average around $45k similarly equipped. So basically they lose $10k per 15k miles or so initially.

 

You're 100% right that it doesn't hit the pickups as bad. The trucks stay high for a while, and the discounts are deeper when they have them.

 

I remember buying my 2007 Sierra for $32k when the sticker price was $48k. Combination of cash back and special offers as the 2008s had just hit the lot, the economy was collapsing, and they were trying to move the 2007s.

 

Seven years later in 2014, when it had 100k miles, I sold it for $20k. So I paid $12k for 100k miles. 

 

 

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1 hour ago, therapy said:

 

Seven years later in 2014, when it had 100k miles, I sold it for $20k. So I paid $12k for 100k miles. 

 

 

That’s awesome and great to hear. I’m crossing my fingers for a similar experience.

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I have probably contributed to the GMC Sierra being ranked so highly on the "chit list" by trading up every year 2016 - 2017 and 2018. I did Not trade because I did not like the product it was just the opposite, i traded because I really LIKE the product and the pricing was great.  I am eyeballing a 2019 but I have not decided if the redesign can earn my business or not............................     

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Posted (edited)
15 hours ago, Dnt said:

I have probably contributed to the GMC Sierra being ranked so highly on the "chit list" by trading up every year 2016 - 2017 and 2018. I did Not trade because I did not like the product it was just the opposite, i traded because I really LIKE the product and the pricing was great.  I am eyeballing a 2019 but I have not decided if the redesign can earn my business or not............................     

I’ll either keep this truck forever or trade in when t1xx generation gets a midcycle refresh in 2021? Basing this on K2xx generation released in 2014 and refresh 2016. 

 

Ive read you should trade in within the first 3 years after buying new or plan on keeping it since value really drops off at the 4 year mark and beyond. 

Edited by 2018GMC

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