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Hello Fellow Chevy Truck Drivers,


I have had my 2010 Chevy Silverado 1500 LT 4x4 Z71 5.3L V8 since new. Since then I have replaced all tires with new Goodyear Assurance TripleTred tires in September of last year (2012). I also had brake fluid changed and the back drums and pads serviced. Recently, my brakes in the front (sounds like both) squeak when I apply them to come to a stop. Please note though that they start squeaking about halfway in my commute to work which is about 1 hour in length or 42 miles one way. The area I live in his hilly but not too bad. I live in the Piedmont area of NC. I do not tow anything nor do I drive "like I stole it", at least not in a while since I haven't volunteered with a fire dept. since 2003. I thought about just going ahead and changing my brake pads on the front but I am hung on the subject of what brand to use and ceramic or not. Any help or suggestions or ideas about what is going on and what course of action I should take would be greatly helpful. Thanks in advance.


Ricky

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I have the same issue with my 2012 with 28,xxx on the clock, I'm in stop and go traffic so that's likely the cause. Plus GM breaks stink. I took it in for a free break check and they said they have about 40% left. So I'm going to change them in the next month or so to avoid resurfacing and save my disks and drums. I'm thinking ECB or Hawk.

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  • 2 weeks later...

The most common cause of the squeaking noise is from your squeal tabs on your front brake pads. These are little metal tabs that stick out towards the rotor. When the pad has worn to ~20-30% of friction material left, then the tabs will come in contact with the rotor. The metal on metal friction causes the squeal, hence squeal tab. This means, "please change me." Be happy, if both are squealing, that means your pads are wearing evenly. Most pads only last 25-30k miles on the front axle. rear axle brakes last longer due to weight transfer under braking. your rear drum brakes may last 60-80k miles pending how they wear.

 

As far as rotor resurfacing goes, its pretty rare that the rotor is thick enough to begin with. So, by the time you've driven it around and thinned the rotor, there won't be enough material to resurface it and stay above the min. thickness (printed on the inside of the rotor). 90% of the time these days, you just have to put new rotors on since they are just thinner these days. OEMs do this to reduce rotating mass for better performance and save weight for better fuel economy. you can buy extra thick aftermarket rotors, but they are costly. It's easier to start with new rotors every time you change your pads anyways.

 

Another cause of brake squeal/squeak is the dust shield. The dust shield around the rotors can collect small rocks which drag along the rotor and make it squeal.

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The biggest cause of the squeek I have found is the fact that the caliper pins are dry. The combination of heat, driving through rain, washing the rims and what ever else strips all the grease off the pins and makes them squeek. Remove the pins, clean them with brake cleaner and paper towels and then heavily lube up with Napa sylglide or your favorite caliper grease. You will have to do this again every 2 years or so, even if the brake pads themselves are fine.

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