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5.3L vs 6.2L V8


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Maybe I should hook up my torque app and check the timing and knock. Others who run 87 on the 6.2 should do the same. This will help end that argument. No?


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Maybe? It would be interesting, especially in the heat of summer, towing something. When its really being worked hard. Ill say my wife has a yukon with a 6.2 and i know damn well she doesnt put premium in it.

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You are wrong, without a max trailering package the 6.2 does not give you any additional towing capacity. While it does give you more power it doesnt change the sticker in the door

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Not what the data shows, bud. The 6.2 data doesn't have any max trailering package in it, just standard axle ratio.

The 5.3 numbers are all over the place depending on trailering package?Screenshot_20200520-185637_Chrome.jpgScreenshot_20200520-185848_Chrome.jpg

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Maybe? It would be interesting, especially in the heat of summer, towing something. When its really being worked hard. Ill say my wife has a yukon with a 6.2 and i know damn well she doesnt put premium in it.

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I posted a link in another thread (or maybe this one) where the 6.2 was tested by AAA with premium and regular.
It showed that there was a very small power difference between the two and a ~7% fuel mileage difference.

Yes, spark is pulled at part throttle and wot with 87. It doesn't mean anything though. Engine adjusts to run based on the fuel it has. If you run premium you get 1-2 more mpg. Cost of premium doesn't offset the mileage gain.

They ran tests on 0% to 6% grades to simulate different loads on the engine.

They determined that even though GM recommends premium, they suggest you're better off running regular unless you care about the insignificant power loss.

The premium fuel requirement is debunked. It's a false argument.Screenshot_20200520-204819_Drive.jpg

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I posted a link in another thread (or maybe this one) where the 6.2 was tested by AAA with premium and regular.
It showed that there was a very small power difference between the two and a ~7% fuel mileage difference.

Yes, spark is pulled at part throttle and wot with 87. It doesn't mean anything though. Engine adjusts to run based on the fuel it has. If you run premium you get 1-2 more mpg. Cost of premium doesn't offset the mileage gain.

They ran tests on 0% to 6% grades to simulate different loads on the engine.

They determined that even though GM recommends premium, they suggest you're better off running regular unless you care about the insignificant power loss.

The premium fuel requirement is debunked. It's a false argument.Screenshot_20200520-204819_Drive.thumb.jpg.a9ef732bdeab580aa313196e641c32f7.jpg

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Well with current fuel prices I’m cool with running 93. When they go up next year (or whenever) I might go to 87.


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The 6.2 will wake up, for me it was around 10000 km. You'll go from, "huh, thought it would feel faster", to "holy ******, about damn time". 0-100 mph is effortless and you'll slam into the speed limiter like you just hit a wall. I'm on 18" wheels, and yes it does make a difference.

 

I think gm severely undercut the l86/87's power. fuel economy, cost and the fact that they couldn't let it make the same or more power then the c7. Im willing to bet they have at least one or two intake manifold designs hidden away.

 

As things sit. You put a 6.2 intake manifold/throttle body on a 5.3, e85 or 93 for that matter... It really narrows that gap. you have to ask, why even make the 6.2 if the 5.3 will get the job done.   

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The 6.2 will wake up, for me it was around 10000 km. You'll go from, "huh, thought it would feel faster", to "holy ******, about damn time". 0-100 mph is effortless and you'll slam into the speed limiter like you just hit a wall. I'm on 18" wheels, and yes it does make a difference.
 
I think gm severely undercut the l86/87's power. fuel economy, cost and the fact that they couldn't let it make the same or more power then the c7. Im willing to bet they have at least one or two intake manifold designs hidden away.
 
As things sit. You put a 6.2 intake manifold/throttle body on a 5.3, e85 or 93 for that matter... It really narrows that gap. you have to ask, why even make the 6.2 if the 5.3 will get the job done.   
Fun factor.

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17 minutes ago, Jonofmac said:

I posted a link in another thread (or maybe this one) where the 6.2 was tested by AAA with premium and regular.
It showed that there was a very small power difference between the two and a ~7% fuel mileage difference.

Yes, spark is pulled at part throttle and wot with 87. It doesn't mean anything though. Engine adjusts to run based on the fuel it has. If you run premium you get 1-2 more mpg. Cost of premium doesn't offset the mileage gain.

They ran tests on 0% to 6% grades to simulate different loads on the engine.

They determined that even though GM recommends premium, they suggest you're better off running regular unless you care about the insignificant power loss.

The premium fuel requirement is debunked. It's a false argument.Screenshot_20200520-204819_Drive.jpg

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What that graph doesn't show you is all the extra knock going on in your engine. Yeah it adjusts, after it senses knock. Then it will continuously keep trying to advance, and keep sensing knock; and back and forth. Is that bad? Only you can decide, its your truck.

Edited by M1ck3y
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I have one of each.  The 5.3 just didn't have the power I was looking for in mountainous terrain.  And even with a 5500 lb trailer I was exceeding payload capacity.  My 6.2 pulls a lot more effortlessly.  In normal driving conditions, the 6.2 has noticeably more power and is a good bit faster than the 5.3.  The 5.3 will now be relegated to pulling my 2800 lb trailer, and even a trailer that small still has the truck right at its payload capacity.  So forget about so-called max tow rating.  It's a nonsensical and irrelevant bragging rights number only.  Try pulling anything at the max tow rating and you'll be exceeding every other weight limitation there is, ie Gross Combined Weight Rating, Gross Vehicle Weight Rating, Gross Rear Axle Weight Rating, Payload Capacity and Tongue Weight Capacity.  In fact, when someone tries to quote their vehicle's max tow rating I immediately know that they don't know squat about towing.

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Not what the data shows, bud. The 6.2 data doesn't have any max trailering package in it, just standard axle ratio.

The 5.3 numbers are all over the place depending on trailering package?Screenshot_20200520-185637_Chrome.thumb.jpg.e278dc3002ec756485c6a4bd7cea7e14.jpgScreenshot_20200520-185848_Chrome.thumb.jpg.fb03e8ba84f3d1207515b7f657a82c0f.jpg

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I dont know where you got your numbers, but in the chevy trailering brochure all the non-max trailering, v8s and 4x4 dmax have the same 15000 gvcw. The the tow capacitys that differ by 2-300 lbs are due to heavier chassis and body, like crew vs double cabs and short and standard beds

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What that graph doesn't show you is all the extra knock going on in your engine. Yeah it adjusts, after it senses knock. Then it will continuously keep trying to advance, and keep sensing knock; and back and forth. Is that bad?  
Modern knock learn factors don't necessarily wait until knock is detected. Knock is not a clear cut ping always.

Knock sensors are microphones. They can measure the relative combustion volume. They will detect when you're close to knocking well before you get to the audible pinging noise.

I tune GM (and some import) vehicles. I've seen this repeatedly. Hell, even the GM Gen 3 PCMs don't need to see knock to realize they're on low octane. If they do see knock, they will adjust more quickly, but it doesn't require knock to realize it's close to the threshold.

I can datalog my gen 5 truck and see when it knocks and see the knock learn factor.

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I posted a link in another thread (or maybe this one) where the 6.2 was tested by AAA with premium and regular.
It showed that there was a very small power difference between the two and a ~7% fuel mileage difference.

Yes, spark is pulled at part throttle and wot with 87. It doesn't mean anything though. Engine adjusts to run based on the fuel it has. If you run premium you get 1-2 more mpg. Cost of premium doesn't offset the mileage gain.

They ran tests on 0% to 6% grades to simulate different loads on the engine.

They determined that even though GM recommends premium, they suggest you're better off running regular unless you care about the insignificant power loss.

The premium fuel requirement is debunked. It's a false argument.Screenshot_20200520-204819_Drive.thumb.jpg.a9ef732bdeab580aa313196e641c32f7.jpg

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Wait this graph is for a 2016. I think the engine and technology have changed since then...


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I posted a link in another thread (or maybe this one) where the 6.2 was tested by AAA with premium and regular.
It showed that there was a very small power difference between the two and a ~7% fuel mileage difference.

Yes, spark is pulled at part throttle and wot with 87. It doesn't mean anything though. Engine adjusts to run based on the fuel it has. If you run premium you get 1-2 more mpg. Cost of premium doesn't offset the mileage gain.

They ran tests on 0% to 6% grades to simulate different loads on the engine.

They determined that even though GM recommends premium, they suggest you're better off running regular unless you care about the insignificant power loss.

The premium fuel requirement is debunked. It's a false argument.Screenshot_20200520-204819_Drive.thumb.jpg.a9ef732bdeab580aa313196e641c32f7.jpg

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https://www.gmc.com/trailering-towing/charts

Heres the gmc trailering brochure if you want to brush up,

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1 minute ago, Jav_eee said:


Wait this graph is for a 2016. I think the engine and technology have changed since then...


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No, its the same engine just different fuel economy crap.

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Wait this graph is for a 2016. I think the engine and technology have changed since then...


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It has changed a bit, yes. But the engine is basically the same. Only difference is DFM instead of AFM, which might close the gap between premium and regular even more in terms of gas mileage. That change was in 2019, so it's still applicable for 2014-2018 trucks, and probably not much different, considering the change between the two is quite minor.

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5 minutes ago, Jonofmac said:

Modern knock learn factors don't necessarily wait until knock is detected. Knock is not a clear cut ping always.

Knock sensors are microphones. They can measure the relative combustion volume. They will detect when you're close to knocking well before you get to the audible pinging noise.

I tune GM (and some import) vehicles. I've seen this repeatedly. Hell, even the GM Gen 3 PCMs don't need to see knock to realize they're on low octane. If they do see knock, they will adjust more quickly, but it doesn't require knock to realize it's close to the threshold.

I can datalog my gen 5 truck and see when it knocks and see the knock learn factor.

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Well, tell that to all the real tuners who see consistent knock running premium fuel. Whats you company name? Website? I find it hard to believe this would slip by someone who knows what their doing.

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