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AFM Disable Damage


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Evening y'all,

 

I know the subject of AFM either deletion or disabling has been beat with a stick but as I was doing some digging I came across a couple of articles that had me wondering. So I recently just ordered a Range for my '16 5.3 and am/ was eager to install it but.... I read that when disabling AFM in the long run it can hurt the motor i.e. lifters. My question is, has anyone been running a AFM disable tune/ flash for a few years and had any issues?

 

Thanks guys 

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Consensus on this website and others seems to be to delete AFM in any way possible as soon as possible, to eliminate oil usage and other potential problems; some say it results in smoother shifting and a better sounding exhaust, and most say it doesn't harm your fuel mileage too much at all.  Some folks think that having all 8 cylinders firing all the time is actually better for your engine in the long run.  

 

In 8 years on multiple forums, I have not heard of any damage caused by turning off AFM.  Seems like any damage is caused by not turning off AFM soon enough.  Yes, it is still possible to have AFM lifters fail after turning off AFM.  But that is due to faulty design or manufacture, not due to AFM being turned off.  All the Range V8 module does is turn off AFM.  Now, of course, it is possible to damage your engine if you use an aftermarket tuner to turn off AFM and install a high performance tune that requires higher octane fuel, and you continue to run regular fuel, or something like that.  And you still need to use the proper Dexos-rated motor oil and change it at the proper intervals, either way. 

 

I ran a Range V8 module for 4 years and then switched to a Hypertech Max Energy 2.0 tuner to turn off the AFM and tune other functions.  

Edited by MaverickZ71
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My last truck was a 2014 5.3.  I had afm tuned out at under 1000 miles and returned it to stock 3.5 years later at 51,000 before trading it in.  I ran it for a couple months like that and no problems at all.  My current truck is a 2014 6.2 and now has 37k miles and is stock. Neither truck used any oil.

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On 7/6/2018 at 1:25 PM, MaverickZ71 said:

Consensus on this website and others seems to be to delete AFM in any way possible as soon as possible, to eliminate oil usage and other potential problems; some say it results in smoother shifting and a better sounding exhaust, and most say it doesn't harm your fuel mileage too much at all.  Some folks think that having all 8 cylinders firing all the time is actually better for your engine in the long run.  

 

In 8 years on multiple forums, I have not heard of any damage caused by turning off AFM.  Seems like any damage is caused by not turning off AFM soon enough.  Yes, it is still possible to have AFM lifters fail after turning off AFM.  But that is due to faulty design or manufacture, not due to AFM being turned off.  All the Range V8 module does is turn off AFM.  Now, of course, it is possible to damage your engine if you use an aftermarket tuner to turn off AFM and install a high performance tune that requires higher octane fuel, and you continue to run regular fuel, or something like that.  And you still need to use the proper Dexos-rated motor oil and change it at the proper intervals, either way. 

 

I ran a Range V8 module for 4 years and then switched to a Hypertech Max Energy 2.0 tuner to turn off the AFM and tune other functions.  

Understood, just wanted to get y'all's opinion on it. Like I had said, upon hundreds of people saying it's great, I found 3 maybe 2 articles stating the negatives. I'd rather real people's opinions. Also yes I agree about oil and stuff . 

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  • 10 months later...

I have been using the Range OBD2 AFM disabler  on my C7 Corvette for awhile now its fantastic. Waiting for Range to certify the DFM version for my Silverado. I will be first in line. The motor is made to run on all cylinders  no worry about that.

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  • 7 months later...
3 hours ago, Kevin vallem said:

Hi guys I just installed in my 2008 Silverado and I like so far. Do I need to install a switch to prevent battery drain? I only dive it a few times a week. 
thank you in advance for any input. 
 

kevin

No switch needed...if you're worried about it draining the battery, simply remove it from the OBD port.  No need in trying to re-invent the wheel

 

https://www.rangetechnology.com/blog/post/battery_draw/

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  • 2 weeks later...
  • 4 weeks later...
  • 2 months later...

has anyone heard of havin engine failure/ruining your engine by putting a cat back exhaust on your 5.3L without disabling the AFM? 
 

ive recently purchased a ‘15 Sierra and I went to an exhaust shop to cut the stock exhaust off at the 3rd cat and put a y-pipe with dual 2.5” pipes out the back and they told me that when it switches to the 4-cylinder mode I could ruin my engine by not having enough back pressure. 
 

Anyone able to confirm/deny this from their experience?
 

I have a Range AFM disabler coming in the mail but it’ll take about 2 weeks to come in. 

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  • 2 months later...

WOW! Even though I just bought a 2008 Impala SS, this is all great information! I have been running in circles reading everything I can since I bought it. I really would like to throw in a simple exhaust, nothing crazy maybe just do a straight pipe or glass one. Disable the AFM and get a 91 tune. But we will see. Does anyone have experience with Diablo? Is HP hard to learn? Do you even want my car questions here lol? Any help is awesome!

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  • 3 months later...

I’ve got a 2018 Sierra 50k miles and already has a cold start lifter tick. Would this make it worse or damage my lifters if I install? All I want is a long engine life don’t care about power or fuel mileage I just want my motor to last anybody have any ideas on what I should do? I can replace lifters for $2000 should I replace first ? I’m scared if I don’t fix now they will collapse and blow my motor 

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These engines will make noise no matter what you do. It's either cold start piston slap or lifter tick. On some it's even the injectors on the GDI trucks, they are very loud when cold.


Spending all that money and getting the same noise afterwards isn't a smart idea to me. The range product or any other tuner that disables the AFM will not harm anything. Just know that just because the AFM is turned off doesn't mean that failure can't still happen. Those parts are still installed in the engine but just not being activated, they could still fail but nobody can tell you if or when.

 

I have 107k miles on my truck, it makes all sorts of sounds. Cold start oil pump noise (normal to hear), injector noise and lifter tick when cold. It sounds like every other LS/LT engine I've had for the past few years. If it doesn't sound like a sewing machine at times, then I'd think something is wrong lol.

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On 10/31/2020 at 12:17 AM, CamGTP said:

These engines will make noise no matter what you do. It's either cold start piston slap or lifter tick. On some it's even the injectors on the GDI trucks, they are very loud when cold.


Spending all that money and getting the same noise afterwards isn't a smart idea to me. The range product or any other tuner that disables the AFM will not harm anything. Just know that just because the AFM is turned off doesn't mean that failure can't still happen. Those parts are still installed in the engine but just not being activated, they could still fail but nobody can tell you if or when.

 

I have 107k miles on my truck, it makes all sorts of sounds. Cold start oil pump noise (normal to hear), injector noise and lifter tick when cold. It sounds like every other LS/LT engine I've had for the past few years. If it doesn't sound like a sewing machine at times, then I'd think something is wrong lol.

THIS.  The 5.3L in our '09 Silverado sounds like the first 45 seconds of Van Halen's Hot for Teacher song on every cold startup and even some warm startups.  

Edited by MaverickZ71
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