Jump to content

Gorehamj

Crash Test Results Indicate That GM May Not Reinforce Passenger Side To Same Safety Standards As Driver's Side

Recommended Posts

IIHS pickup crash test march 19.png

John Goreham
Contributing Writer, GM-Trucks.com
3-21-2019

IIHS has just completed its latest round of testing of 11 pickup truck models. The new testing adds passenger-side small frontal overlap crash test results. This test is important because in real-world crashes investigators find that about 25% of all fatalities and serious injuries occur in crashes of this type. This test is one of the hardest in the American market. NHTSA does not perform the test and the test is also carried out at higher speeds than NHTSA's other tests. The small frontal overlap test simulates a vehicle striking a utility pole or similar object with just a portion of the front structure. IIHS added the passenger-side test after it discovered in some research testing that automakers were not reinforcing the side not commonly tested. They tested a Toyota RAV4 which earned a Good score on the driver's side, and Poor score on the passenger side. 

 

Ford's F-150 is the only truck so far tested to earn a score of Good on every crash test. Overall, the Honda Ridgeline is the only truck in America that has earned a Top Safety Pick award. Watch the comparison in the video to see the difference between a Good result (F-150) and a Poor result (Toyota Tundra). 

GM's results show that the company scores the second from lowest rating in many areas. By all appearances, GM is one of the remaining companies that does not reinforce the passenger's side the same way it does its driver's side.  

 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Offset crashes are indeed very deadly.  I think It’s more common to strike something like a tree to give that sort of an effect.  It’s pretty rare to hit a solid object with zero give, buckle, or sway. 

 

Things in the real world that tend to kill you.

-Not buckled in

-Under the influence

-Inexperience

 

Good news for GM is that those causes are not the fault of their design.   I’m not concerned about their crash results unless it’s something bizarrely dangerous like Takata airbags.  I do wish they were on top tho.... and honestly Ridgeline should not be a comparable but it should be rather embarrassing.   Honda engineers very safe vehicles.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I get that the older design trucks would do poorly since this test is new. But an all-new truck like the 2019 should do better. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ladies and Gentleman: this is one of the main reasons why cars and trucks are getting insanely expensive nowadays: the IIHS wanting manufacturers to essentially build vehicles like tanks and loading them up with expensive "Safety " items like blind spot monitoring, parking assist, Automatic Emergency Braking, and a million airbags that Insta-Total the vehicle when deployed!

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Naah not really.  In order to be competitive, one will try to outdo the other with newer technology so the others have to counter with other technology and thus it goes and goes. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I had some interest in the RAM prior to seeing these test results, now that I've seen this my interest in buying one has increased... Hopefully Chevy makes some adjustments for the 2020 model year...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Is the Honda Ridgeline even a Truck?     :loser:

Why is it in the same crash test class as Silverado, Sierra, RAM, Tundra and Ford?

It should be in the small class of testing.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ouch!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 3/24/2019 at 7:34 PM, truckofwinandawesome said:

Ladies and Gentleman: this is one of the main reasons why cars and trucks are getting insanely expensive nowadays: the IIHS wanting manufacturers to essentially build vehicles like tanks and loading them up with expensive "Safety " items like blind spot monitoring, parking assist, Automatic Emergency Braking, and a million airbags that Insta-Total the vehicle when deployed!

The 19s are priced like TOTL trucks yet they have fewer options, lower quality materials and now it's apparent lower structural strength than their competitors.  I love my k2xx truck and won't be in the market for a long time on a new one, but I'd probably go Ford for a new truck.  

 

That's coming from a GM "lifer".  GM is not headed in the right direction in my opinion. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 3/29/2019 at 7:38 PM, Yondu said:

The 19s are priced like TOTL trucks yet they have fewer options, lower quality materials and now it's apparent lower structural strength than their competitors.  I love my k2xx truck and won't be in the market for a long time on a new one, but I'd probably go Ford for a new truck.  

 

That's coming from a GM "lifer".  GM is not headed in the right direction in my opinion. 

The main thing that holds me back from Ford is that they don't seem to offer any option for an Auto setting for their 4 wheel drive systems on their middle of the road optioned trucks... It seems like you can get a heck of a deal on a Ram these days, seen some new body 2019 Laramie model crew cabs for $37k in my area  where as a comparable LTZ chevy seems to be more like 45-48k but, I am concerned that the build quality and resale value might not be up to par on FCA vehicles still... My in-laws have a 2014 Cherokee and my Brother has a 2017 Grand Cherokee and neither are impressive in build quality..

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)
On 3/24/2019 at 7:34 PM, truckofwinandawesome said:

Ladies and Gentleman: this is one of the main reasons why cars and trucks are getting insanely expensive nowadays: the IIHS wanting manufacturers to essentially build vehicles like tanks and loading them up with expensive "Safety " items 

God forbid someone survives a crash! The dollar is mightier than the life! Let's go back to 60's crash standards and call it natural selection.

 

 

You know why I love these systems? Because they are smarter than most of the people driving today. Bring on the self driving cars, the computers won't rubber neck the crash off to the side. Yeah they will run a few red lights and take out some cyclists, but do we really care? We are 'Murica, Collateral Damage FTW!

Edited by SnakeEyeSS

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now


  • Similar Content

    • By Gorehamj

       
      John Goreham
      Contributing Writer, GM-Trucks.com
      11-13-2018 
       
      A new study conducted by the Insurance Institue For Highway Safety has proven that GM's automatic emergency braking (AEB) is working and that it can have a huge impact on the number of crashes it is designed to prevent. Study author Jessica Cicchino, IIHS vice president for research, looked at 2013-15 Buick, Cadillac, Chevrolet and GMC brand vehicles. GM provided VIN numbers and whether or not the vehicles were equipped with the optional AEB system. The analysis of real-world crash data revealed that the vehicles equipped with both warning and AEB reduced accidents by 43%. The crashes were the type the system is best at preventing, front to rear crashes from behind. What is most significant is that the accidents reported by police to involve injuries were reduced by 64%. Accidents were also reduced by the GM system that only offered a driver a warning, but by a much lower percentage.

      "The evidence has been mounting that front crash prevention works, and it works even better when it doesn't solely rely on a response from the driver," says Jessica Cicchino, IIHS vice president for research and author of both studies.
       
      GM is one of the last manufacturers who is launching new models without making the technology standard. The Silverado, for example, offers AEB, but only on some trims, and it is optional on others. Every manufacturer has pledged to make the technology standard on all mainstream models and all trims by 2022. This new study jives with a prior IIHS study that looked at Volvo vehicles. 
       
       
    • By Gorehamj

      John Goreham
      Contributing Writer, GM-Trucks.com
      6-4-2018
       
      GM’s Executive Vice President of Global Product Development, Mark Reuss, had the unfortunate and embarrassing experience of crashing a pace car this weekend at the Detroit Grand Prix Indycar event. Reuss lost control of the Corvette ZR1 in a corner with uneven pavement. The vehicle appeared to oversteer and corrections sent Reuss into the wall nose first. Thankfully, Reuss and a track official in the passenger seat were uninjured. 

      Members of GM-Trucks.com staff have met Mark Reuss on multiple occasions and have shared racetracks with him. Mr. Reuss is “guy’s-guy” who is very easy to speak to. We’ve had the pleasure of sharing meals with him and informally discussing a wide range of topics. Mr. Reuss has also granted Zane Merva of GM-Trucks.com formal interviews to give updates on truck developments. At the track events we visited, Reuss took advantage of media days to get to know and hear from members of the media during important Chevrolet and Cadillac performance model launches. He also took advantage of the open track to turn hot laps in the products he helped bring to market. His competency behind the wheel of 700 hp + cars is not in question. Mr. Reuss also knows this particular track, having driven it on many occasions before this event.
       
      GM issued this statement on the accident: “We are thankful that there were no serious injuries. Both the pace car driver and the series official were taken to the infield care center, where they were checked, cleared and released. It is unfortunate that this incident happened. Many factors contributed, including weather and track conditions. The car’s safety systems performed as expected.”
       
      Mr. Reuss posted a comment to his personal Facebook page thanking friends, family, and GM fans for their support.  Since the post was not public, but only shown to his FB friends, we have opted not to reproduce it in its entirety as other media have chosen to do. Reuss apologizes in the post, and thanks his well-wishers, but says he let people down. We don’t feel let down. If a pace car isn’t a real track car, and if it isn’t going to be driven hard, then what’s the point? 
       
    • By Gorehamj

      John Goreham
      Contributing Writer, GM-Trucks.com
      9-06-2017
       
      In a recent round of comprehensive safety testing by IIHS, the Colorado and Canyon fell short of the best in class for safety. As the chart above and the video will show, the cab configuration of the Colorado and Canyon differ in their crash test results.
       
       
       
      In order to earn the highest score IIHS awards, the Top Safety Pick Plus, a vehicle must have a score of Good on all crash tests. The Colorado and Canyon do offer a trim that meets this requirement. However, a vehicle must also have "Acceptable" or "Good" rated headlights. The Colorado and Canyon only come with "Poor" rated headlights. Also, GM does not make a midsize truck that meets the "Advanced" rating for forwarding collision prevention.
       
      In the midsized truck segment, only the previously tested Honda Ridgeline earns a Top Safety Pick Plus rating.



    • By Gorehamj

      John Goreham
      Contributing Writer, GM-Trucks.com
      6-14-2017
      General Motors crossovers and SUVs have scored relatively low in a new round of testing by the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety. The Institute started to test and evaluate headlights this past year in a new indoor facility that it built from scratch. One model year since the new testing began, IIHS now includes headlight scores on its overall evaluation. To earn the top score a vehicle must have a trim with headlights that score Acceptable or Good. None of the four GM models IIHS tested earned a score that high.

      This news is particularly bad for GM with regard to the all-new 2018 Chevy Equinox. Because it scores only Marginal, it will not earn the top safety rating that its peers, the RAV4, CR-V, Forester, Rogue, and other models do. Cadillac's XT5 also has few excuses for not being able to score as high as affordable models like the Hyundai Santa Fe and Toyota Highlander which earned scores of Good and Acceptable respectively.
       






  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

  • Forum Statistics

    205,586
    Total Topics
    2,197,233
    Total Posts
  • Member Statistics

    174,833
    Total Members
    8,960
    Most Online
    mox-ct
    Newest Member
    mox-ct
    Joined
  • Who's Online   83 Members, 1 Anonymous, 614 Guests (See full list)

×

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.