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Just like any other truck that puts up with salt from the winter roads or lives by an ocean breeze. It is a 12-13 year old truck after all.

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I think the main problem is what they put on the roads in the winter combined with owners not doing some kind of rust preventative each year. My trucks frame is still solid for a used 230k mile truck, but I had to do the maintenance on it to get it back to good shape. I think a few more years of it being left go would have made it a lost cause.

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I've got a similar problem with my 2003 2500 4WD Suburban. I've had numerous issues with it - all I believe related to rust. I've had to replace brake lines, the rear bumper is rusted out - the frame is really rusty - etc.

 

Since Chevy doesn't even make a 2500 series Suburban any more - I've got a quandary on my hands, because I really anticipate needing to have the services of a truck like this for the next 20 years or so. I only drive it maybe 5-6000 miles a year at best - but when I need it - I need it.

 

The way I see it - I have a few options:

 

1) Do a restoration on this truck. The body itself is in pretty good shape. It's really the undercarriage and frame that need attention. I'm thinking that pulling the body off and doing a full frame resto - or even getting a new frame (somebody actually has one available locally for $2k) - and then carefully prepping, painting and rustproofing that new frame with an eye towards longevity - might give me a truck that will last for a good many years to come

 

2) Selling this truck and picking up a later year GMT800 2500 series Suburban with low miles (I've seen a few for sale with as little as 30k) - and then carefully prep that to ward off rust.

 

3) Go to a GMT900 2500 series Suburban and try to get to it before it gets rusty.

 

Question: has anybody here removed the body from the frame on one of these trucks - is it a huge pain in the butt job?

 

 

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My 03 still looks decent somehow, But the previous owner of my 99 must not of washed it or undercoated it at all...

 

 

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But I fixed it better than new...

 

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Later this summer I plan on parking it fr a bit and going over it with a sandblaster and coating it all with chassis saver, I will also use Fluid film fr the rest of the trucks life.

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My 2006 was pretty bad at 230k. Mainly just surface rust, not to much came off in chunks.

 

attachicon.gifIMG_20140802_201551051.jpg

This is how my 2000 looked. The 04 is spotless

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I am not impressed with the "look" of my frame. i have an annual rust check service done and have a full warranty with them. the wax was peeling starting in 2012. i used to spray rust check black paint to help keep it protected. i had installed in the fall of 2013 a gm wheel well protector. we have bad witness here, but my truck gets rinsed off daily. that is right daily. i also gets hand washed several times a week. still when i am under neath, i have concerns with keeping this truck long term. but it is what it is. in fact i figure i wash it so much, that i have caused my dash board to crack!!!!! :)

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Sorry to hear, but did you ever undercoat it? We Krown (rust control) our 2004 every year, after a thorough bath in the spring. All cross members were dripping with oil after the Krown was sprayed. Traded the 04 off last week, frame was solid.

 

My 2011 will be getting the same treatment.

Edited by WilliamBos

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Figured this was a good thread to post this in.

 

I just found out about this place yesterday from somebody on another forum.

 

Co. is located in Rhode Island and specializes in frame rust repair and vehicle rustproofing.

 

https://www.autorust.com/in-house-service/

 

The guy who sent me the info - said he had a car done by them about 20 years ago and the thing is still on the road and going strong.

 

 

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My 03 still looks decent somehow, But the previous owner of my 99 must not of washed it or undercoated it at all...

 

 

100_2024.jpg

 

100_2026.jpg

 

100_2025.jpg

 

But I fixed it better than new...

 

100_2035.jpg

 

100_2031.jpg

 

100_2037.jpg

 

Later this summer I plan on parking it fr a bit and going over it with a sandblaster and coating it all with chassis saver, I will also use Fluid film fr the rest of the trucks life.

 

 

I noticed the replacement cross member tube is straight tubing versus the obvious curve in the factory tube. Doesn't the straight tube cause the gas tank to sit down in back at an angle? I am just preparing to do the same repair to my 1999 Silverado and it would sure be a lot simpler to use a straight tube instead of fabricating one with a curve.

 

MichaelJT

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From what I've heard is keeping your vehicle in a garage. Especially if it is heated can speed up the corrosion process.

 

I keep my trucks in my heated garage and don't have any issues

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tubes and box beams... gone like the 1940s.

I love welding, had to learn a lot. subaru played with tubes in the 80s... non-stop fail.

 

If you can rid of amperage, the anode attraction will stop.

 

Salt is not the issue. You attract salt to a steel breakdown? you got uranium, outer space, somebodies septic tank, a city drain cover, beach sand, and whatver we let out of our backsides.

 

the frame needs an "out" to stay alive, not an "in."

 

LED lighted trucks are going to leave the new wimpy trucks called strong.. even though they are no different.

 

Real shame. I just browsed photos of 2 cylinder boxer trucks from the turn of the 18th century... 10000 times the wieght of the engine on flexing c-rails and solid tires. All .Day. Long.

 

GM ought to be embarassed today.

 

I took in the last of the old c-rails, already did my crude welding. it was in great shape. 19 years, 350k. It did hve an atomic event to get through it all.. should have expected bizarre anyway.

 

 

the spare tire is another catalyst, until the silicon blended years.. that is actually not all that old ya know. maybe 10-15 years ago before the real good stuff came out.

 

 

kudos to that welding, it is well worth it for the trucks. Don't be afraid of the ugly steel.

Edited by barry G

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I noticed the replacement cross member tube is straight tubing versus the obvious curve in the factory tube. Doesn't the straight tube cause the gas tank to sit down in back at an angle? I am just preparing to do the same repair to my 1999 Silverado and it would sure be a lot simpler to use a straight tube instead of fabricating one with a curve.

 

MichaelJT

Good eye...The tank is unnoticeably lower, You would literally have to measure it to tell a difference. But that being said where you will notice a difference is with your gas tank strap bolt. I used a threaded rod and a nut instead to make it easier. If you want I can take a picture of it all back together so you can see how it looks.

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Thanks for the reply. I figured it would have to be that way. What is it about the straight tube that necessitates the threaded rod and nut?

 

I used threaded rod and a nut to attach tank strap in my former 2000 Silverado but that was just because the spring nut broke and I had to drill it out. I made my own T-nut for the top out of steel bar stock. A matter of using what i had on hand.

 

I have my 1999 apart now and and I am beginning the repairs to the rusted portions of the crossmembers. There is very little detailed documentation on the web for this particular repair and yours is among the best.

 

Please post the picture here as I am sure it would benefit others besides me.

 

Thanks!

MichaelJT

Edited by MichaelJT

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Well, I know why you needed the threaded rod and nut. The strap is actually too short to reach the bracket. I fixed it by modifying the strap to be longer there and that fixed it. The strap had already been cobbled together because of rust by the previous owner and i just cut out that shoddy work and made it the correct length. Lots of work replacing all those cross members and gussets but very satisfying. I'm ready for another 16 years now.

 

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MichaelJT

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