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Found 122 results

  1. John Goreham Contributing Writer, GM-Trucks.com 6-11-2019 Ram revealed the specs for its updated EcoDiesel V6 engine in the 1500 this week. The big news is 480 ft-lb of torque in a light-duty truck. Towing is also very impressive with towing up to 12,560 pounds. Finally, Ram says that it expects to also have class-leading fuel economy from its 3.0-liter turbo-diesel engine-equipped truck. "The new Ram 1500 EcoDiesel is America’s most powerful half-ton diesel pickup, following up on Ram’s Heavy Duty torque leadership and achieving what no other manufacturer has, with up to 480 lb.-ft. of torque in a 3.0-liter engine,” said Reid Bigland, Head of Ram Brand. “The all-new EcoDiesel engine and our eTorque mild-hybrid powertrain technologies deliver the highest available fuel efficiency for our Ram 1500 customers.” Ram says it will also pair its diesel with the only air suspension in the class. Being able to lower the truck at highway speeds will likely help with fuel efficiency. Ram's new 3.0-liter EcoDiesel V-6 uses dual overhead camshafts (DOHC) with four valves per cylinder and a 60-degree angle between the cylinder banks. The block is cast compacted graphite iron, which Ram says provides strength to dampen vibrations, but weighs less than grey cast iron. Ram uses a compacted graphite iron bedplate to add rigidity to the block. The new EcoDiesel has a forged steel crankshaft and connecting rods for strength and durability. Ram's aluminum alloy pistons are cooled on the underside via oil jets. Heat-treated aluminum cylinder heads have individual bearing caps to reduce friction and minimize NVH. The engine's chain-driven overhead camshafts employ roller-finger followers. Ram pointed to these specific upgrades as significant: -A new-generation water-cooled turbocharger with variable geometry turbine (VGT) increases efficiency and responsiveness during transient conditions -Redesigned cylinder head intake ports improve swirl and flow, increasing performance and fuel economy -The exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) system design has been updated to a dual loop (low and high pressure) system. The added low-pressure circulation system draws gases after the diesel particulate filter, thus minimizing turbocharger energy losses, which increases fuel economy -The compression ratio has been optimized to 16.0:1 from 16.5:1 -High-pressure (29,000 psi/2,000 bar) direct-injection fuel injector nozzles were redesigned to match the newly designed and optimized combustion chamber -Lightweight aluminum alloy pistons were completely redesigned to include thinner rings and low-friction coating on the pin and side skirts to reduce losses -NVH has been reduced by offsetting piston pin by 0.3 millimeters from the centerline; thus, minimizing mechanical noises -The lower portion of the two-piece oil sump uses a lightweight sandwiched polymer/metal material that further reduces NVH -The dual vacuum pump system uses electric and a new mechanical low-friction pump with new blades that improve overall system efficiency Ram will not build this engine in the United States. Rather, it will be produced FCA Cento facility in Ferrara, Italy and imported. Watch for price and fuel efficiency new in about two months. The engine will be available in Ram trucks starting this early winter of 2019 unless it is delayed for emissions testing or other reasons.
  2. John Goreham Contributing Writer, GM-Trucks.com 6-2-2019 Pricing Chevrolet has just announced its prices and specs for its first-ever inline-six turbo-diesel offered in a Chevy full-size light-duty truck. The all-new 3.0-liter Duramax turbo-diesel will offer class-leading torque and horsepower according to Chevy. First up, pricing. The new Duramax option will be available on LT, RST, LTZ and High Country models. It is priced identically to the 6.2L V-8 option as a $2,495 premium over a 5.3L V-8 model or $3,890 over a 2.7L Turbo model. Specs Next up, specs. The Duramax 3.0-liter engine will generate 460 lb-ft of torque delivering 95 percent of peak torque at just 1,250 rpm. Peak torque is sustained from 1,500 rpm through 3,000 rpm, providing a powerfully smooth and satisfying driving experience. Being a diesel engine, power is low relative to bigger V8 gas engines, but pretty substantial for its displacement at 277 horsepower. “From the moment the engine is started, to its idle, acceleration and highway cruising, the 3.0L Duramax performance will change perceptions of what a diesel engine can offer in refinement,” said Nicola Menarini, director for Diesel Truck Engine Program Execution. “With advanced technologies that draw on global diesel expertise, it’s a no-compromise choice for those who want the capability and driving range of a diesel in a light-duty truck.” Design and Technology Since the engine is an inline six, it is inherently balanced. There is no need for balance shafts and the engine only requires two cams. Chevy uses a cast aluminum alloy block that provides the strength required to support the high combustion pressures that occur within a diesel engine, while also offering a 25 percent mass savings over a cast iron engine block. Chevy says there are seven nodular iron main bearing caps that help ensure the block’s strength under those high combustion pressures, while also enabling accurate location of the rotating assembly. A deep-skirt block design, where the block casting extends below the crankshaft centerline, also contributes to the engine’s stiffness and refinement. It’s complemented by a stiffness-enhancing aluminum lower crankcase extension attached to the main bearing caps. Chevy went on to add that the rotating assembly consists of a forged steel crankshaft, forged steel connecting rods and hypereutectic aluminum pistons. The alloys in the respective castings for the rods and pistons make them lightweight and durable. Silicon is blended with the aluminum for heat resistance and tolerance within the piston cylinders, which enhances performance and makes the engine quiet. GM used a thick piston crown — the top of the piston — and also a reinforced top ring to add strength to support the high cylinder pressures enabled by turbocharging and the engine’s high 15.0:1 compression ratio. To ensure durability, Iron cylinder liners are employed. “In addition to reduced friction, the architecture enables smooth operation,” Menarini said. “The new Duramax 3.0L elevates the 2019 Silverado with one of the most refined and efficient diesel engines in the segment.” Here is a quick rundown of some other features of this new engine: OHC: Overhead camshafts offer a direct, efficient means of operating the valves, while four valves per cylinder activated by maintenance-free finger followers with hydraulic lash adjusters increase airflow in and out of the engine. This arrangement is integrated on the Duramax 3.0L’s lightweight aluminum cylinder head, which is topped with a lightweight composite cam cover that incorporates the crankcase ventilation and oil separation systems. A pair of lightweight, assembled camshafts actuates 28.35 mm diameter (1.12-inch) intake and 24.55 mm diameter (0.97-inch) exhaust valves. The camshaft drivetrain is uniquely located at the rear (flywheel side) of the engine, for greater refinement and packaging considerations for the comparatively long inline-six. A crankshaft-driven chain drives the high-pressure direct-injection fuel pump, while a chain driven by the fuel pump drives both intake and exhaust camshafts. A smaller belt drives the variable flow oil pump from the crankshaft. Variable geometry turbocharging enables the Duramax 3.0L engine to deliver class-leading horsepower with minimal effect on overall efficiency. The system uses closed loop controlled vanes position and sophisticated electronic controls to automatically adjust boost pressure to the desired value based on engine running conditions and instantaneous power demand. The liquid-cooled turbocharger features a low-friction ball-bearing shaft and is mounted close to the exhaust outlet of the engine for quicker spool-up of the turbine and quicker light-off of the exhaust catalyst. A water-to-air intercooling system produces a cooler higher density air charge for greater power. Maximum boost pressure is 43,5 psi (300 Kpa) absolute. Low-pressure EGR: The Duramax 3.0L utilizes new low-pressure Exhaust Gas Recirculation to optimize performance and efficiency. The EGR system diverts some of the engine-out exhaust gas and mixes it back into the fresh intake air stream, which is drawn into the cylinder head for combustion. That lowers combustion temperatures and rates. Traditionally, EGR systems in diesel applications recirculate exhaust gases between the two high-pressure points, the exhaust manifold(s) and intake manifold. However, it generally requires efficiency-robbing assistance from the turbocharger or other supporting elements to achieve the pressure differential required for sufficient EGR flow rates. The new low-pressure system adds to the high-pressure system, supporting continual adjustment of exhaust backpressure for more efficient operation. It recirculates gases between the low-pressure points in the exhaust system (downstream of the particulate filter) and after the compressor inlet. When the low-pressure EGR is activated by an electronically controlled valve, the engine burns exhaust gas that has already passed through the particulate filter. That increases the turbocharger’s efficiency, which helps overall vehicle efficiency without deteriorating the rate of particulate matter emitted by the engine. A variable intake manifold offers dual air intake pathways for each cylinder. Electronically controlled flaps — one for each cylinder — shorten or lengthen the airflow to each cylinder. This optimizes the airflow into the engine and improves performance and responsiveness across the rpm band, particularly at lower engine speeds. A variable-pressure oiling system with a continuously variable-displacement vane oil pump enhances efficiency by optimizing oil pressure as a function of engine speed and load. With it, the oil supply is matched to the engine requirements rather than the excessive supply of a conventional, fixed-displacement oil pump. The engine uses low-friction Diesel Dexos 0W20 oil. Oil jets located in the block are employed for performance and temperature control. They target the inner core of the piston with an extra layer of cooling, friction-reducing oil. The jets reduce piston temperature, allowing the engine to produce more power and enhance long-term durability than engines without the technology. Active Thermal Management helps the engine warm up quickly to achieve and maintain its optimal engine temperature for performance and efficiency over the entire engine operating range. The system uses a three-actuator rotary valve system to distribute coolant through the engine in a targeted manner. It sends heat where it’s needed to warm up the engine to reduce friction and heat the passenger cabin or cools when needed for high-power operation. The Duramax 3.0L also features split cooling between the block and head. Common rail direct fuel injection of 2,500 bar (36,250 psi) helps generates class-leading horsepower and torque. The system’s pressure is generated by an engine-driven twin-piston pump sending fuel to solenoid-activated injectors with nine-hole nozzles that support precise metering of the fuel for a smooth idle and lower combustion noise. The fuel system is capable of multiple injections per combustion cycle — up to 10 times per injector — for more consistent and stable combustion performance that translates into smoothness and refinement, particularly at idle. Electronic throttle valve: The Duramax 3.0L features an electronic throttle valve to regulate intake manifold pressure in order to optimize exhaust gas recirculation rates. It also contributes to a smooth engine shutdown via a more controlled method of airflow reduction. Ceramic glow plugs used in the Duramax 3.0L heat up more quickly and hotter than conventional metal-based glow plugs, helping the engine start and heat up more quickly in cold weather. The Duramax 3.0L achieves unassisted and assisted starting temperatures of -22 F (-30 C) and -40 F (-40 C) respectively. Stop/start technology helps optimize efficiency in city driving. The driver-selectable system shuts off the engine at stoplights and other stop-and-go situations. The engine automatically restarts when the driver takes their foot off the brake. Transmission: Chevy will offer just one transmission with the 3.0L Duramax, its 10L80 10-speed automatic transmission. The transmission features a centrifugal pendulum absorber torque converter that reduces vibrations to improve smoothness, reinforcing its performance, efficiency, and refinement. Exhaust braking is part of the design. This technology uses the diesel engine’s compression to help slow the vehicle, requiring fewer brake applications by the driver when in Tow Haul mode. Due to some minor emission certification delays, the new diesel engine will be available in early 2020, rather than late 2019.
  3. I just traded our 2012 BMW X5 diesel (3.0L Inline-6 asymmetrical twin-turbo, 265hp, 425tq) for a 2018 Suburban. The turbodiesel performed brilliantly in that 5200 lb SUV, and you could easily get 26-28 mpg on road trips, and it did north of 20 mpg average in local driving. I've been saying for years that a lot of these mid to large-sized SUVs are just screaming for 6-cylinder class diesel engines, so it's nice to finally see them popping up. I'd love to see this engine be an option in the next gen Suburban/Tahoe and the Yukons. Who else?
  4. John Goreham Contributing Writer, GM-Trucks.com 5-28-2019 General Motors will reportedly delay the introduction of its new six-cylinder diesel engines for the new generation Silverado and Sierra. Anyone following the diesel vehicle trends in America should not be surprised. Volkswagen's cheating scandal changes things for automakers who want to use diesel engines globally, and in the U.S. in particular. Ram's diesel fiasco didn't make things any easier for automakers who want to use diesel engines in trucks. The upshot of the cheating and other "misunderstandings" is that diesel vehicles draw close scrutiny now. With billions in fines now paid and even some employees in prison, nobody at GM wants to launch a diesel vehicle without giving the EPA the opportunity to do any testing it wishes to do prior to launch. Most vehicles are self-certified by automakers, or are tested by third-parties. We suspect that zero diesel vehicles will be in the future. The EPA is all over these known polluters to ensure compliance. Other manufacturers, notably Mazda and Hyundai had previously announced plans to introduce new diesel engines in America and then opted not to. We do not think GM will back out. GM has already staffed and prepped the Flint Engine Plant to build the new diesel engines. Motor1 reports GM spokesperson Monte Duran as saying, "Yes, we are shifting the 3.0L Diesel from a late 2019MY to a 2020MY as emissions testing is taking longer than expected. However, we did not attribute to a single entity, as the truth is this is a collaborative effort between GM and several government entities. We will make the 2020MY Duramax available for dealers orders soon, and expect to deliver the first trucks to customers soon after emissions testing is complete."
  5. Zane Merva Executive Editor / Publisher - GM-Trucks.com May 24th, 2019 A few days after we got a look at the changes for the 2020 Sierra, Chevrolet is letting on to what's going to change for the 2020 Silverado. Surprise, it's actually some significant stuff. More 6.2L First up, the 6.2L makes its long awaited move to trim levels below LTZ. Now Custom Trail Boss, RST, and LT Trail Boss trim levels can also order the 420 horsepower engine option. As owners of a 2019 LTZ with the 6.2L , we highly recommend it. More 10-speed LT Trail Boss and High Country with the 5.3L engine will upgrade to the all new 10-speed transmission. This move was more expected as GM flushes out the 10-speed into more models and slowly phases out the 8-speed and 6-speed transmissions its sold for years. A New 3.0L Diesel The new light duty Duramax makes it's debut in 2020. It will be available on LT, RST, and above trim levels. This engine will also come with the new 10-speed transmission. Smaller changes Other additions to the lineup for 2020 include adaptive cruise control and a new "transparent trailer" camera system that displays up to 15 different views. Order Guide Deletions (GE0) Oakwood Metallic (PDT) High Country Premium Package (R13) WT Appearance Package New Features (DPO) and (DQS) Vertical Trailering Mirrors (KSG) Adaptive Cruise Control now included in (PDJ) Safety Package II Changes (MQB) 10-speed transmission is now standard on 4WD High Country models with (L84) 5.3L EcoTec3 V8 DFM engine and LT Trail Boss (UV2) HD Surround Vision is replaced with (UVS) HD Surround Vision with Two Trailer Camera Provisions (CWM) Technology Package now includes (UVN) Bed View Camera (PCV) WT Convenience Package is now available with (ZW9) pickup bed delete (PTT) Tire Pressure Monitor System becomes (PTT) Tire Pressure Monitor Sensors (V46) and (VJH) Chrome bumpers are now free flow on 1WT (Q5U) 17" Bight silver painted aluminum wheels are now free flow on 1WT 2020 Chevrolet Silverado Photos
  6. Hello, I am desperate for any assistance that can be provided for our situation. We are US military stationed in Germany. Our 2015 Sierra recently threw the p21dd code. We ordered the replacement reductant tank and installed it ourselves. The engine codes were cleared but we are still getting limitations on our speed and distance. We are stuck at 88kph/80km until we drop down to 6kph. In the research that I've done so far, it seems we need a manual regen done on the truck in order for the limitations to go away. This is where we are having the biggest issue. GM will not assist us in any way because we do not reside in the US. They constantly revert us back to the German GM entity and I've lost all hope in trying to communicate with them. We have been hung up on more times than I can count because we do not speak German. So, is there any hope for fixing our vehicle before it goes limp? If we can't get it fixed, we don't know what we will do as we cannot sell it in this state, we can't ship it in this state, and we definitely can't drive it. We are struggling to find a light at the end of this tunnel and would greatly appreciate any help available.
  7. Thom Cannell Contributor, GM-Trucks.com March 7th, 2019 Heavy Duty trucks mirror the contest for market domination in light duty trucks. This year both GM and Ford announced significant upgrades to the engines powering their all new 2500 and 3500 HD trucks as each company upgraded their diesel engine, and delivered new gas engines. At GM, the launch event centered on Chevrolet, who brought in truck writers from every segment—popular to fleet management—to Flint, Michigan’s Flint Truck Plant. Flint is the original home of General Motors trucks and the spiritual and historical home of the UAW. So, Flint Truck Plant is receiving an all-new facility constructed and designed for just HD trucks, with the former truck assembly areas destined for warehousing and future projects. New L8T 6.6-Liter Gas Engine We first spoke to Mike Kociba, a GM engineer and part of the Small Block team to learn about the new 6.6-liter V-8 engine we'd been anticipating. Mike told us the new motor “is a marriage of the six-liter it replaces and an upgrade in technology levels to Gen 5 architecture.” A careful look will disclose similarities in key areas where GM has maximized their experience with the six-liter’s durability and improvements in performance levels derived from Gen 5 architecture. “Specifically, new here is the gray cast-iron block which is unique for this application, hyper-eutectic purpose-built pistons for this application and heavy-duty requirements, forged powdered-metal connecting rods, and a forged steel crankshaft,” Mike continued. The most significant change is the addition of Direct Injection. It’s all new, an industry first for the heavy-duty market and new to GM trucks. “When we added DI, we took the roughly 400 KPa fuel pressure from the low-pressure pump and dialed it up to roughly about 15 mPa for engine operation under key conditions,” Mike continued. “That allows us to increase compression ratio, now 10.8:1 using regular fuel. Without DI you're not going to hit those numbers without losing a lot of spark efficiency. With those additions, and the six millimeter longer stroke, that gets us up to 6.6-liters.” “That suite of changes allows us to hit class-leading gasoline engine torque, at 464 foot-pounds at a lower engine speed than the outgoing six-liter was optimized for. I'm proud of its 401 horsepower, which is SAE Certified, no games, legitimate. This (engine) is purpose-built to crank out those numbers day, after day, after day with no compromise in durability. Customers can have confidence they're going to pull, tow whatever trailer you need.” There are other new features like an all-new water pump and a massive cooling fan to meet the demands of the HD customer base. New is how the water pump drives the fan through a one-inch shaft using purpose-built bearings to handle loads. Another first for HD is a variable-output oil pump. “No mater what the severe operating condition is for the customer, the pump is capable of dialing in more, or less oil pressure regardless the requirement. The engine features an aluminum oil pan, nylon 6-6 air intake, and stainless steel exhaust manifolds unique for the Heavy Duty market. That’s because HD market has specific requirements for (fuel) enrichment and these stainless manifolds will meet those requirements. “We have variable dual-equal valve actuation, like on light duty, where intake and exhaust are phased together and controlled through the actuator on the front cover. It's chain driven for accessories.” GM designed this engine specifically for upcoming standards for particulates and NOx emissions standards. “With this architecture we're not just making power and torque, but improved emissions and improved efficiency.” Mike continued. We noted the massive valves, which Mike said are common with Gen 5 architecture for valve layout and their pushrod technology. “That's how we get this compact shape. When you compare the size of the two engines, they're similar, which is due to the common 4.4-inch bore spacing.” A unique feature of the new engine is inter-bore cooling. Coolant flows between the Siamesed bores, notably in the upper bores where there’s a tendency to generate higher temperatures. “For two-valve technology of course you've got the spark plug, and the fuel injector, splayed outside. To avoid heat, we have the coil mounted directly on the rocker cover and the boot mounted next to the manifold with industry-standard individual coils for each cylinder.” This is great stuff, we though, but engine development isn’t cheap. So, why a new 6.6-liter when the 6-liter was doing well? “We needed to improve to Gen 5 level of technology to be sure (the engine) is capable of delivering on durability requirements. Customers love the convenience of gas, but if you look at the market—for instance trailers with more gadgets and slide-outs—everything is getting heavier. Customers want to be sure they can tow with confidence, no compromises, whether it's fuel economy, power, torque, emissions, efficiency, they don't want to pull up to their neighbor and have to make excuses. That's what we targeted. No compromises. With the significant technology we put into this engine, it makes segment-leading torque without compromising efficiency or emissions. Peak torque is at 4,000 rpm, 400 rpm lower than the 6.0-liter. Three things enable the new 6.6-liter's better power output. Direct injection (DI) allows us a higher compression ratio; longer stroke is good for increased torque (but not as good for horsepower as piston speeds are high) and for heavy-duty application where you need torque everywhere it’s why we focused on a longer stroke to get to 6.6-liter displacement. Those changes enabled us to broaden the torque curve, which is up 20% everywhere, for greater work potential.” We thanked Mike and asked if we’d missed anything. “Small engines with turbochargers allow them peak torque off idle, but for heavy duty we don't want that complexity. For the Heavy Duty segment we (General Motors) have durability requirements—Global Engine Durability—that are unique and very long and stringent requirements. We know customers need 401 horsepower and 464 lb.-ft. of torque today, tomorrow, and every day for years to come with no compromise in durability. We know our customers and, if they can't use their truck today, they might not get paid. That's why we focus on durability.” Brand New HD 6-Speed Transmission With that in mind, we next spoke to the systems chief engineer for six-speed FWD and RWD transmissions Rich Mardeusz. More power and more torque tend to break an older transmission. So, we wanted to know what changes had been made to the new transmission to carry the additional torque. “We started with the 6L90 that's in the current HD vehicles and full-sized vans (and ZL-1 Camaro and CTS-V), received the horsepower and torque curves from the engine engineering teams and then performed an analysis of all mechanical components from front to back,” Rich said. General Motors uses specific simulation tools for different parts. “For instance, we have a "gear damage analysis tool" for analyzing the gear set and how much damage it may receive over the life of the vehicle,” Rich told us. The result was a need to improve the torque converter and the clutch pack, which needed to be more robust to accommodate the greater power output of the upgraded 6.6-liter V-8 engine. From a clutch pack standpoint, changes were simple, according to the engineer, as there was enough room in the case to add a clutch and one backing plate to each of the clutch packs to handle additional power. When it came to the torque converter, things changed. “We looked at the components from a heavy-duty diesel torque converter and a high-output gas torque converter and then took the torque-carrying components from the diesel and married them to the spring and damping components from the gasoline torque converter. That’s what was needed to accommodate the approximate 22 percent across-the-board torque increase.” So, the new torque converter can A) handle the added torque of the new engine and B) damp out the firing frequencies from the gasoline engine, which are significantly different from a diesel engine. All of the shafting and gears were able to handle the torque. Interestingly, there is no dipstick. GM has the confidence to eliminate it, and only change fluid at suggest intervals of approximately 100,000 miles, more often for those who mostly tow, or drive over mountains with full loads. Another surprise, the transmission uses GM-spec Dexron VI fluid, GMs standard since 2005, as they found no reason to change. 2019 L5P Duramax 6.6-Liter Once we’d completed our gas powertrain interviews, we turned to the diesel side of Heavy Duty. We spoke to Max Sala, whose Italian accent tipped us to an affiliation with GM’s diesel engine center of excellence in Turin, Italy. Max said that their objective for the new Silverado HD was to increase towing capacity and ensure functionality with the new Allison/GM transmission. Remember, the Duramax 6.6L Turbo-Diesel V-8 engine makes 445 hp. and 910 lb-ft of torque. “We added a bigger fan now 28-inches, a bigger oil cooler that is upgraded from 14 plates to 19 plates, and we fine-tuned the cylinder head gasket” Next up were improvements to the engine-brake capacity, taking into consideration towing capacity. “It’s better by 14-percent and we introduced smart activation of the engine brake,” Max continued, “There's still a button for manual activation, but for safety there's automatic activation at certain RPMs.” Under the new control system, the powertrain will recognize any need for the engine brake and activate automatically. For instance in driving down hill and forgetting to shift, the higher RPM means automatic activation. “With that, we have better after-run strategy. Every time you tow uphill, temps rise and you have a message to cool the engine when stopping. If, by chance you forget and close the door, the system cooling system activates automatically for up to 15 minutes to cool the engine for reliability.” That isn’t the end of changes, as the engine has been completely recalibrated to match the new 10-speed Allison transmission. “Emissions have been improved and fine-tuned to maintain the best efficiency the transmission can offer to our customers.” With these changes, most importantly, Chevrolet says they are now capable of delivering full torque at any time, in any gear, and that they have done everything to the engine, transmission, driveline, drive shaft and frame to improve strength and durability. “What's important is how safe (the new HD trucks) will be and how comfortable it will be for our customers to drive these huge trailers up, and down hills.” Max concluded. Allison transmissions have gained a peerless reputation for strength and durability. Adding a 10-speed transmission branded with the Allison name is a great choice. David Ames, now GM assistant chief engineer on the Allison transmission and liaison with Allison, is a former Allison engineer. A natural fit. The 10-speed is a collaborative effort with joint development of the analysis, engineering, as well as testing. So, testing was performed at Allison and at GM, each with their own set of rules and test regimes. “We go back and forth”, David told us. “Today we have a ratio-span of five and this transmission has a span of 7.2, so the new 10-speed provides both more overdrive and a lower first gear.” We asked about the projects’ starting point. “We (at GM) come out with a "here's what we're looking for" and we begin an internal development contract. It was a pretty clean sheet of paper. So, the controls on the bottom are from a smaller 10-speed, some pieces and parts, but not the entire controls package. For the most part, it's all new to handle the increased power and much larger torque. We collaborated with Allison on this transmission (GM does have a 10-speed transmission of its own) which made it necessary to meet their (Allison) design requirements, their analysis requirements, their engineering requirements, as well as our own. It's a very compact transmission. If you had a 6-speed for comparison, this more dense, more compact and solid to get ten speeds into a package that would still fit nicely into the vehicle and not take up too much space,” David continued. This transmission’s torque converter has a lock-up clutch and is unique in that it will lock up in first gear, even under max loads. So, if you're pulling 33,500 pounds, you can do a first gear launch and lock up right away, which helps get rid of heat. We asked David why this is important. “Normally in first gear you're under high torque and generating a lot of heat, which puts a lot of demand on the cooling system. Locking up gets rid of that heat and the 7.2 ratio gives you a lower first gear. For instance, the six-speed uses a 3.1 first gear and the new transmission has a much lower 4.5 first gear. It's got four planetary gear sets, six clutches and the main place you'll notice the ten speeds, not only in launches and driving with heavier loads—it's very smooth—is going down a grade. Often you're trying to downshift to save brakes and having ten gears you can usually hold the right speed and not feel like you're running over the car in front of you, tapping the brakes or going too slow.” “Also, we built in the first OEM PTO option. Note that the chain drive to the PTO is engine-speed driven rather than turbine-speed driven, which is important to many commercial customers, and it’s quieter drive than gear driven systems.” We asked David for an overview of the combined Duramax-Allison package. “For those who need it, it’s a nice package, one we're very proud of because of the outstanding durability. I think we're going to do a better job of putting power to the road than anybody out there. Whatever torque the engine is putting out, it's getting to the road in an accurate way. I think this transmission will be far more durable than people need it to be. Four-five years from now people will understand how durable it is.”
  8. John Goreham Contributing Writer, GM-Trucks.com 3-25-2019 General Motors' new 3.0-liter six-cylinder turbo diesel engine is arriving later this year. Over the weekend GM-Trucks.com received confirmation of the new engine's specifications when in the 2019 and 2020 Silverado. Elizabeth Winter, Assistant Manager, GM Product and Brand Communications told us: I can confirm that the all-new, Duramax 3.0L inline-six turbo diesel will deliver an SAE-certified 277 hp and 460 lb-ft of torque, more than any other light-duty, full-size truck diesel available. Dealers and customers can place orders for the efficient, refined diesel and the first customer deliveries begin this summer. We will share more information, including towing capacity and efficiency, in the near future. It is priced identically to the 6.2L V-8 as a $2,495 premium over a 5.3L V-8 model (or $3,890 over a 2.7L Turbo model) making the 3.0L Duramax the most affordable light-duty diesel engine on the market. GM has said previously that the Silverado's new 3.0-turbo diesel engine have start/stop technology and will be paired with a 10-speed transmission. By comparison, Ford's Power Stroke diesel, arriving in May, offers 250 horsepower and 440 lb.-ft. of torque. The 2019 Ram has not yet received its updated diesel engine. The 2018 diesel engine offerings specs were 240 horsepower and 420 lb.-ft. of torque. We will bring you more information as it is made available.
  9. Afternoon ladies and gents. I have spent hours upon hours trying to do my homework here on the GM 6.0 gasser engines. I have been around diesels the past 6 years, love my current tow rig. (2013 Ram 2500 Tradesman w/ 6/7 cummins) Truck is stock no deletes. What brought me here is we have our first baby on the way, the thought of saving some money by trading down to a gasser seems like a good idea. But i am not sure with how often i tow that i will be happy. I live in Illinois and tow a 28 ft enclosed racecar hauler throughout the state (mostly flat). I tow every weekend from April to October generally, the trailer weighs close to 8K loaded. Obviously the cummins tows this with zero issues, and i'm assuming the GM 6.0 would tow this fine as well. I found a 2009 Chevy 2500 that's loaded with 110,000 miles on it. It appears to be in great shape, from what i found out it has the LY6 engine. If i were to make the switch i'd free up over 100 bucks a month, but is that really enough to justify the switch? I'm not in a bind for money at the moment, but obviously saving some money never hurts. I guess i'm basically looking at some opinion's from guys that have maybe made the switch from a diesel to a gasser, and see what there thoughts were? Or do i tow enough that i should just stick it out with the diesel? Looking forward to your thoughts! *Also, i would estimate that based on my location and where i'm traveling i drive roughly 3500-4000 miles a year with the trailer hooked up.
  10. Had a 2018 Sierra 2500 for a loaner while my 1500 was having warranty work done. We got a couple 0 degree days here in St Louis during the polar vortex and the 2500 went into limp mode and wouldn't allow me to go above 25 mph. CEL came on and a message popped up "Reduced Engine Power". I was 30 miles from the dealer that loaned it to me and they sent someone out and gave me a 2019 Silverado 1500. Next day they towed the 2500 back and found the diesel fuel had "gelled" from the cold temps. Curious, is this common in diesels? I let it warm up for at least 5 minutes before driving as I know diesels need a little more warm up time than gas engines. How could it idle and drive up to 25 mph with the fuel "gelled" as the dealer put it? Didn't shake or sputter, just had the rpm limiter kick in at 25 mph.
  11. I just bought a 1991 Chevy C70 Kodiak C7H042 6.6L 403 CUI Diesel in amazingly great condition. I am now the 3rd owner of this dump truck. The first owner took great care of the vehicle, everything thing appears to be well maintained and no shade tree work. All the parts, wiring and accessories appear to be original and well maintained. However, the second owner bought this truck and never used it. It has sat in a field for about four years. To get to the point, I completely serviced the truck and replaced the batteries, checked the fuses, grounds, relays and I have absolutely no power to the truck. No interior or exterior lights and no lights on the instrument panel. What could be the issue?
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