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Zane

Frame issues? Anyone else hearing this rumor?

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There's a issue being claimed on Facebook that the new frames are susceptible to being bent if the trucks are not lifted correctly. The problem is the wider frames are also thinner... and require a wider puck for lifts. Which most people don't have?  Part of the claim is that a 2019 even fell off a lift because of this issue. 

 

Has anyone else heard anything close to this? I can see how this might be plausible (new frames needing a special wide pucks) but I'm skeptical about frames actually bending and there being a "big issue". 

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No idea, but if true, this is demonstrative proof why it is money-wise to wait a year or two after a redesign.  Good luck.

Edited by lapoolboy
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Yes, I read something about this.  Since I will be taking my 2019 to only the dealer for service..  no worries. 

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Have not heard anything like that myself.

Seems like it would reflect on the liability of the shop if a lift accident occurred.

Dealerships and shops will have to conform their equipment to this new frame style.

Much like Panama had to build a wider canal to accommodate todays wider, larger cargo vessels. 

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I have heard the rumor.  The one about every K2 is junk?  The "Vibrator" everyone shakes?  AFM your burning 2qts every 5 miles?  Lifter failure too?  Seat movement?  Mylink radio dies?  NO REAR AC VENTS.....just thought I put that in there incase you all have not heard that one?  NO REAR AC VENTS!  Actually, I have really come to expect something everyday with my GMC....hopefully the accelerator breaks off as I am rounding a hard turn in the Mcdonald's drive through!  Then I go FERD ACTION! 

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I guess the Silverado and Sierra can finally have the focus shifted away from the "chevy shake" or "shakearado"

 

Now we will know them as "Bendarado:smash:   LOL

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So.

 

There are new lift adapters out for Rotary and Challenger, which are GM Dealer Equipment lift partner suppliers.  They are 2 inches wider than the standard adapters that come with the lifts.  They are available to all GM dealers from the lift manufacturers.  Dealers have been sent multiple a message in regards to this, as well as from GM's dealer training portal.  I believe lifts that have the flip pads have wider adapters available already and have for a few years now.  If a dealer doesn't have these yet, either they have them ordered, or they are plain ignorant.  We have some on order where I'm at.   

 

They can get damaged with narrower adapters because those raised lips on the ends (pictured and on the flip up pads) would puncture.  The frame would be held only by those two lips, and not the full pad.  Tech who knows no better + didn't read/do the training = damaged frame front. 

 

Quote

Caution: Lifting the vehicle at the widest point of the frame rail requires adapters that are wider than the frame rails. Please see your hoist manufacturer for the appropriate adapter. Failure to use the appropriate adapter in this location may cause damage to the frame.  

 

Pictured below is the secondary frame lifting point, which is the wide front section.  The last picture with the round pad and round frame unit is intended to be the primary front of frame lifting point. 

 

 

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Edited by newdude
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Wonderful explanation and write up once again Newdude!  :thumbs:

So it sounds like its more of a tool issue and not that the new T1's frames are junk or manufactured incorrectly.

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Good to know. Not a big deal, but a little unsettling.  It's ok maybe if you can't lift a challanger on an average lift, but I go to Canada once a year and South Carolina once in a while.  If I'm in BFE and something goes wrong where the truck has to be lifted and I didn't know this info or the whole in the wall repair place doesn't either I'd be screwed possibly.  

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46 minutes ago, Sierra Dan said:

Wonderful explanation and write up once again Newdude!  :thumbs:

So it sounds like its more of a tool issue and not that the new T1's frames are junk or manufactured incorrectly.

Much agreed. 

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2 hours ago, Sierra Dan said:

Wonderful explanation and write up once again Newdude!  :thumbs:

So it sounds like its more of a tool issue and not that the new T1's frames are junk or manufactured incorrectly.

 

I wish GM would get on with publishing all the frame details in the GM Upfitter manual to see the specs on the frames.  They used to do this in the order guide as well, including thickness of the frame.  I'm curious what it is compared to K2/GMT-900.   

 

Order guide just shows blanks:  https://www.gmfleetorderguide.com/NASApp/domestic/graytabcontroller.jsp?graytabtype=7&rpoid=36178&vehicleid=21483&section=oi_def

 

What's funny is, Colorado/Canyon have a similar area in the frame like the one in question on T1 and its wide on those too.  You can't flip up a flip pad lift on there as it will sit on the ears of the flip pad. 

 

EDIT:

 

Quote

The fully boxed steel frame is also 88 pounds (40 kg) lighter than its predecessor, while offering 10 percent greater torsional rigidity. Eighty percent of the frame is made of high-strength steel varying from 2 to 5 millimeters in thickness, and every millimeter is optimized for performance using a variety of processes, including hydroforming, roll forming, conventional stamping and tailor-rolled blanking. As a result, frame sections, gauges, grades, processes and materials strategically vary to maximize strength, durability and stiffness without adding unnecessary mass.

 

https://media.chevrolet.com/media/us/en/chevrolet/vehicles/silverado/2019.detail.html/content/Pages/news/us/en/2018/jan/0113-2019-silverado.html

 

http://gmauthority.com/blog/2018/02/2019-silverado-frame-lighter-stronger-smarter/

 

Time to get out my measuring tools! 

 

Edited by newdude

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Yikes this could turn out to be a nightmare for people who use Quick Lube type places...

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19 minutes ago, NWI Denali said:

Yikes this could turn out to be a nightmare for people who use Quick Lube type places...

Quick lubes have pits around here.  The idea any vehicle should be supported by those flip pads is silly. Put the entire weight of the truck on a few 1/2 inch wide points??

Edited by shift_grind

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8 minutes ago, shift_grind said:

Quick lubes have pits around here.  The idea any vehicle should be supported by those flip pads is silly. Put the entire weight of the truck on a few 1/2 inch wide points??

I was talking more alone the lines of uninformed non-GM dealerships not using the new adapters and bending and crimping customer frames.

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I run my current truck up on ramps and lift the rear diff and Jack stands to change the oil.

 

Only tire rotations I use a floor jack for.  This is more BS to keep all service at the GM dealerships though and keep everyone paying through the nose.

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